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Thread: Fractured Firing Pin of Mauser 71

  1. #1

    Fractured Firing Pin of Mauser 71

    ALCON,

    I have a Mauser 1871 single shot with a firing pin that fractured on the tip enough that it cannot reach the primer. Is there anyone that would be able to repair this and what would be the cost.

    Thanks,
    AJC

  2. #2
    Boolit Master

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    Hi, Tjnitehawk, and welcome to the forum! Believe it or not, I have one with the same problem. I've been checking the Gun Parts Corp. for about a year now, and they list the part, but it's always out of stock. Repairing the existing firing pin would require some imaginative welding or machining, and I decided the easier course of action would be to keep checking back with GPC, e-bay, and the various other parts sellers.

  3. #3
    Boolit Master
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    Have you tried Numeric gun parts or Hoosier They both stock mauser parts. you might also try turning one out on a lathe. there are several talented machinests on here who might make one. Looking at a parts diagram on line,you might see if a later model one would fit. They appear the same.
    Last edited by koehn,jim; 01-13-2019 at 02:33 PM.
    jim

  4. #4
    Boolit Buddy
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    If you have access to a lathe cut off the broken smaller diameter portion,drill the front of the firing pin and install a new tip retaining it with green loctite.
    Springfield Sporters may have a firing pin if they reopen the facility.

  5. #5
    Boolit Buddy 55fairlane's Avatar
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    I have a lathe and I am a tool room machinist.......I would be very happy to try to do this repair for you.....please contact me if your interested

  6. #6
    Boolit Master Idz's Avatar
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    Just curious. The firing pins I've made for antique rifles have been mild steel that I case hardened with "cherry red". They seem to work ok. Others have used drill bits and drill rod but I think case hardened with a ductile core is better for fracture resistance. What do you machinists think?

  7. #7
    Boolit Buddy 55fairlane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idz View Post
    Just curious. The firing pins I've made for antique rifles have been mild steel that I case hardened with "cherry red". They seem to work ok. Others have used drill bits and drill rod but I think case hardened with a ductile core is better for fracture resistance. What do you machinists think?
    It's 6 of one half dozen of another.....if you don't draw back (take some of the temper out)the part can end up Being brittle like glass......unhardeden tool steel is still very tough but will take some bending without fear from braekage.....so this very much depends on application......I would make the repair part out of a drill shank....or if you perfer I would use a cowl pin as there all ready properly heat treated......ream hole to .001-.003 oversized degrease both parts, insert repair part let green loctite wick in .....or drill same size as repair part and also degrease/loctite

    This isn't hard complex tool making.....it's basic small shaft repair
    Last edited by 55fairlane; 01-13-2019 at 07:43 PM. Reason: Spelling

  8. #8
    Boolit Buddy 55fairlane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idz View Post
    Just curious. The firing pins I've made for antique rifles have been mild steel that I case hardened with "cherry red". They seem to work ok. Others have used drill bits and drill rod but I think case hardened with a ductile core is better for fracture resistance. What do you machinists think?
    mild steel otherwise know as low carbon steel will not take a heat treat with out interduction of some sort of carbon to it..... they make case hardening compounds you heat part and dip in or you can do the same with a mix of charcoal & bone meal
    Last edited by 55fairlane; 01-13-2019 at 07:46 PM. Reason: Spelling

  9. #9
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idz View Post
    Just curious. The firing pins I've made for antique rifles have been mild steel that I case hardened with "cherry red". They seem to work ok. Others have used drill bits and drill rod but I think case hardened with a ductile core is better for fracture resistance. What do you machinists think?
    I would just use drill rod and make a new one. Maybe harden the tip some. It may not need it.

  10. #10
    Boolit Master
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    I have made firing pins for trapdoor spring fields out of stainless steel. I have a 98 with the tip broke off I was going to try to drill out and put a new tip in.

  11. #11
    Boolit Buddy
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    I have fixed several old mauser firing pins. Broken off at the tip . most drilled ok. One was too hard to drill. Even heated to soften it up didn't work as it air hardened. What did work was to get everything set up in the lathe. Then start the lathe. I heated the firing pin red hot and while hot drilled it with a hi speed drill. It worked I got the hole drilled. Sure the drill was finished ,it was cheap enough. I then used 3/32 music wire inserted into the firing pins to complete the repair. Dressed down to fit of course. I use soft solder for this. All have worked for years. A couple of M91s and several beater 98s were cheaply fixed. This was easy and I thing better than welding .
    n.h.schmidt

  12. #12
    Boolit Buddy
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    have a picture of the firing pin in question?

  13. #13
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idz View Post
    Just curious. The firing pins I've made for antique rifles have been mild steel that I case hardened with "cherry red". They seem to work ok. Others have used drill bits and drill rod but I think case hardened with a ductile core is better for fracture resistance. What do you machinists think?
    As some said it's one or the other. I prefer drill rod, harden the tip and opposite end. Havent had one come back yet. If its complex I might try and fix the tip with drilling and soldering in a new tip, harden the best you can. I think I have a pin in a parts rifle, it's there just dont know if it's the proper length.
    Be well
    When you read the fine print you get an education
    when you ignore the fine print you get experience

  14. #14
    Boolit Master Idz's Avatar
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    As I understand it "Cherry Red" is a less noxious version of "Kasenite" that alloys carbon and metals into the surface of mild steel to a depth of .01-.02" to provide a hard surface. If drill rod is used on small parts it will harden all the way through and be more brittle than a case hardened part.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check