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Thread: In need of warm boots

  1. #41
    Boolit Master
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    Doing some more research on those old white felt boots that we used to call "bunny boots"...This is what the correct name is (I gather)
    U.S.ARMY WWII 10TH MTN FELT DOUBLE BUCKLE BOOTS ARTIC ISSUE. They were made by A.R. HYDE & SONS CO. There are several pairs on eBay that are NOS selling out of Greece. If they weren't so darned expensive I would get a pair for nostalgia's sake. I also found that there still are boots made of felt. One popular type is made in Russia and are traditional Russian garb. Very cool.
    AKA hans.pcguy

  2. #42
    Boolit Master
    Tom W.'s Avatar
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    I gotta ask....... What about L.L. Bean boots? I never had a pair so I'm just asking.��
    Tom
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    Did I ever mention that I hate to trim brass?

  3. #43
    Boolit Master
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    Schnee's.

  4. #44
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    I was a lineman up north most of my life and my office was zero many days. What we found that worked best was a pair of the old (we call them golashes) zip up rubber boots but lacross (at least they used to ) makes them with a fur lining. Biggest cause of cold feet is sweat. Those worked good because when your feet were warm in the truck or at the office you could pull them off and wear your normal boots that were underneath. Arch support is critical for a lineman who climbs and the other advantage to doing it that way was you had arch support for climbing or if you have to walk long distances. If you every tried climbing in a pair of sorels youd know what im talking about. Its brutal. Did some searching and couldn't find lacrosse's but these are what im talking about https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=3&ajaxhist=0
    Last edited by Lloyd Smale; 12-08-2018 at 10:43 AM.
    Soldier of God, sixgun junky, Retired electrical lineman. My office was a 100 feet in the air, closer to God the better

  5. #45
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    One good trick that helps a LOT is - Wiggle your toes. Old hiker's trick. It gets more circulation to your toes going, which keeps your feet warmer. If you notice your feet are cold, try it - Wiggle them a lot - It helps!

  6. #46
    Boolit Master
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    Vapor barrier

  7. #47
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    Muck boots is all you see in the ND oil fields.
    The major loss of heat in a body is through the head, heat rises. I assume you're helmeted on a snowmobile bu the top of the head and back of the neck loose the most heat, so a silk balklava will help your feet stay warm. Next is the back of your hands so good gloves. Then the top of your feet and kidney area. Boots need protection from cold penetration on the top and bottom. No cotton socks and wool poly blends work the best for me.
    [The Montana Gianni] Front sight and squeeze

  8. #48
    Boolit Master
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    My dad used to tell me that wiggling his toes while he was serving in the Korean war was the only thing that kept his feet intact.
    Tom
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    Did I ever mention that I hate to trim brass?

  9. #49
    Boolit Buddy
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    wet feet=cold feet fact. got to keep em dry as stated futher back a propylene wicker sock is wonderous even better if you throw in some gold bond (any quality foot powder I like gold bond, available everywhere and reasonable) then a good high quality bulk wool sock cabela's and bass pro have some very good ones (not cheap) I like the real tall one for hip waders as my knees also get cold (no cab on my tractor when I'm blowing snow usually -35 f ) Then a good pack boot Sorel, Kamik, anything with a removeable boot type liner to exchange with fresh dry ones. I try to change liners frequently if I'm going to be outside a lot ( they can be thrown in the dryer to speed up drying) also a good heavy felt insole helps to insulate sole of your foot against the frozen ground cement steel or in my case bedrock so prevalent around here. just a side note when I worked on the drill rig our whole crew wore Dunlop rubber boots that had thinsulate impregnated into them most of the time we went barefoot in them all winter ( we drilled at cold lake and they didn't name it cold lake because of heatwaves frequently -40 or more) the floor of the rig was baresteel checker plate and we didn't sheet in like they do now.

  10. #50
    Boolit Bub cas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minerat View Post
    I have a 2005 model of the Baffin Apex boots.
    I've been looking at these, but I'm concerned about flexibility or lack there of. They look rigid and clunky, like they'd be uncomfortable or tiring on long walks or hill climbs. Can you comment on this?

    For years I hunted in "insulated" rubber boots hunting and my feet froze. Bought some Sorel's and they were MUCH warmer, but I still froze. Bought some Rocky 800gram thinsulate boots for warmer weather and found they were warmer than my Sorel's. When they wore out I bought some 1200gram Rocky's and my feet have never been cold again.... until this year. I guess the insulation has given up. I happened to have my 1200gram rubber boots that I wore bow hunting with me and wore them instead. They were MUCH warmer than my aparenly wearing out Rocky's, so I guess the insulation is worse than I thought. lol

    So now I'm looking at Baffins for long sits and snow, but I'm unsure on which model. I still want to be able to go on long walks and climb hills without them wearing me out.
    Former cylindersmith.

  11. #51
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom W. View Post
    I gotta ask....... What about L.L. Bean boots? I never had a pair so I'm just asking.��
    I have had a pair for a few years now. Basically good for homeowner snow blowing and recreation but would not use them for really cold situations.

  12. #52
    Boolit Master
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    +1 for Muck boots. I live and work, (and hunt) in northern Maine. 2 deg F this morning. I've used sorrels, mouse boots and a couple different brands of "Pack" boots. But now I'm sold on Mucks if I'm going to walk more than 100 yards in them. Better fit, warmer, totally waterproof and you can walk in them all day without having to pull them off periodically to re-adjust your socks. When I'm out in the real cold, I always wear two pairs of socks. a thin pair of wicking socks, (olefin or silk) next to the skin and a heavy pair of wool socks over them. I try and keep a couple of those chemo foot warmers in my pocket if I think I'm going to be sitting still on a stand for more than an hour.

  13. #53
    Boolit Bub
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    When we used to winter camp with the Boy Scouts, my feet would feel like blocks of ice, until I found a pair of Baffin Eiger boots. Those are truly game changers. It's worth checking them out. I bought them at Jay's in Gaylord, not sure where you're located.

    Tim

  14. #54
    Boolit Master


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    Quote Originally Posted by TCoggins View Post
    When we used to winter camp with the Boy Scouts, my feet would feel like blocks of ice, until I found a pair of Baffin Eiger boots. Those are truly game changers. It's worth checking them out. I bought them at Jay's in Gaylord, not sure where you're located.

    Tim
    Tim, I am about 25 miles from Gaylord
    Don Verna

    NRA Endowment Member

  15. #55
    Boolit Master Dan Cash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dverna View Post
    I have two pairs of decent boots. Irish Setters and Sorels. Neither keep my feet warm especially still hunting or riding snowmobiles.

    I am not very price sensitive...say $300 or so

    What would you guys who live in really cold climates recommend?

    Thanks
    I live in North Dakota and have good luck with the Sorrels But my neighbor is happy with the Muck boot that others have mentioned. I use a Merino wool sock, don't make the boot real tight and put a coating of Vicks on my feet when dressing. Other greases will work too, even bacon fat. Old trappers used animal fat on their entire body to help stay warm, especially areas that could get wet.
    To paraphrase Ronald Reagan, the trouble with many shooting experts is not that they're ignorant; its just that they know so much that isn't so.

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