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Thread: In need of warm boots

  1. #61
    Boolit Master

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    Come April, let us know what works out the best for you. It might help someone else.
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  2. #62
    Boolit Buddy
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    DVerna, I was raised in East Jordan, and hunted an ice fished all my Michigan life. Moved to
    Wyoming in 1990, and continued to ice fish in even colder temps. My Sorrel boots bought new in 1991 at the Cowboy Shop in Pinedale have the original felt liners in them, still keep my feet toasty! My secret is already been mentioned, slip a plastic bread bag over your socks, keep the felts from absorbing any perspiration and still fluffy. Now I upgraded to Walmart plastic bags.. Give them a try. You'll be glad you did.

  3. #63
    Boolit Bub cas's Avatar
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    For me antiperspirant on my feet equals blister city and several days of misery. I'll never do that again, I'd rather be cold.
    Former cylindersmith.

  4. #64
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    NEOS insulated, waterproof overboots. I have a pair I wear over sneakers or hiking boots all winter.

    Thin summer weight smartwool with a medium pair over them or expedition weight of really cold. Tight boots will always be cold. If you can't freely wiggle your toes you will have cold feet no.matter what boots you have on.

    Smartwool touque or baklava. If wearing a hood, fleece is ok but nothing beats wool imho. Loved and worked outside all my life.
    Last edited by jonp; 12-21-2018 at 09:07 PM.
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  5. #65
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    Don; If you feel that a recommendation from California might help...

    The two pairs of socks trick is a good one. I have Lacross Pac Boots which are like Mega Sorels. IE: Leather uppers rubber lowers and felt liners. Big enough to fit two large pairs of boot socks. My feet don't usually get cold unless I am sitting around with my feet on a cold cement floor. It will suck the heat out of you in short order no matter what. Just having a piece of cardboard or plywood or something under your feet works wonders.

    But the way to keep all of you warm is to use two Jon E Hand Warmers (the kind that run off lighter fluid) in pockets sewed into a vest or the inside of your coat directly over your kidneys.

    Your kidneys filter your blood and they are a full flow filtration system. All your blood goes thru them frequently, and if they are heated your blood gets heated and pumped thruout your body and you stay warm.

    I figured this out for myself, and had some pockets sewed into my Carhartt Vest which I wore under my Carhartt Work coat. Jon E also used to make a heavy flannel belt with pockets for this exact purpose. I used to work as a Millwright and when we were doing Turbine Rebuilds on the coast in CA it was always in the winter, and even though the temps were in the 40's the windchill coming off the ocean was brutal, and especially at 3AM! Unfortunately they wouldn't let us hide in the bosses office just because it was cold, we actually had to work.

    I'm sure that people around the Great Lakes have used this type of body heater for along time.

    Also for boots just go to Cabela's they have every boot known to man. I'd look at the serious Pac Boots with built in Gaitors. If they work for Mushers they should work for you.

    Also the Mickey Mouse Boots the Army uses are pretty popular with people in Alaska, and they come in White or Black and are around $100. Try Colemans Surplus in PA www.colemans.com

    Hope this helps

    Randy
    "It's not how well you do what you know how to do,,,It's how well you do what you DON'T know how to do!"
    www.buchananprecisionmachine.com

  6. #66
    Boolit Bub Big Wes's Avatar
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    https://www.amazon.com/HotHands-Toe-...eoL&ref=plSrch

    These work exceptionally well lasts about 10 hours
    "Hollow Points"-"From Those Who Care Enough To Send The Very Best"


  7. #67
    Boolit Buddy Jedman's Avatar
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    When I was in my 20's and 30's I hunted mostly in the southern part of Ohio where it's very hilly and most of my stands and areas I hunted were 1/2 mile trek or more.
    When it was really cold and I wanted to stay all or most of the day I would carry a large duffle bag with all my heavy outer clothes and Sorel PAC boots and super warm hat to put on at the stand.
    I would dress with breathable underware and wool bibs and heavy wool shirt to make the trip to the stand wearing no hat but a pair of thin gloves. I get really warm walking hills carrying that big heavy duffle plus my gun or bow so I have to let the heat and perspiration leave and when I did get to my stand I wanted to be not sweaty or have damp socks. After cooling down I would put on my heavy insulated coveralls , new socks, pac boots, heavy gloves, hat , facemask and put all my stuff I took off and put it in a plastic bag and stuff it in the duffle and getting 20-25 feet up in the tree stand I would pull up the duffle and my gun or bow on a rope and hang the duffle on a screw in hook.
    Good thing I started 2 hours before daylight to get all this done .
    It worked as out of all the guys I hunted with that started all bundled up at the truck and tried to walk to their stands sweating theyould be out of the woods and back at the truck warming up in less than 2 hours and I could stay all day if needed.
    That was then and now I would never go thru that much work to shoot a deer. Most places I hunt now are much closer plus I wouldn't even think of setting out in -20 chill factor days anymore.

    Now I still hunt cold weather 20's maybe teens for 2-3 hours but that's all I can take anymore, plus the hunting clothes and boots have improved since 40 years ago.

    Jedman

  8. #68
    Boolit Buddy
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    Cool

    I had/have a couple of problems: after I got out of the Air Force, my size 10 1/2 feet kept growing, and now I wear size 15! I did and do have trouble finding boots my size. I tried the two sock trick, but all the largest liner socks were too small and cut the circulation in my feet. I tried to find mukluks like I wore in the service, which were plenty warm with the felt liners, but again, size was the limiting factor. I finally got a pair of Cabela's Iron Ridge boots, size 15!, fairly heavily insulated; wore them with one pair of heavy socks, with pretty good success. I thought at last, my feet are getting acclimated to cold weather! WRONG!
    I was developing Diabetic Neuropathy, and just couldn't feel the cold. I even discovered I had walked around one whole day with a thumbtack stuck in my foot, and didn't notice.
    I have a pair of Lacrosse -40 degree boots that my kids insisted I get for Elk Hunting, which do work pretty good and the Iron Ridges in a closet, somewhere, and I have found a company...Schnee's from Montana or Wyoming that makes Mukluk or Pac boots with felt liners in larger sizes. They are expen$ive, and with 4 kids in High School and College, and now, retired not in the budget, and as Sorels are always too small, no matter the size, I stuck with what I had.
    Now at nearly 80, I just don't go out when the temperature is below 30 degrees! My days of hunting or standing out in the rain/snow /20 degree weather photographing auto"Wintercross" races are thankfully, OVER! I've asked myself "WHY?" many times. 'Cause my buddy asked..."Let's go, he said; It'll be FUN", he said! Like the afternoon he called with his New Jim-dandy, Sure thing, can't fail Varmint hunting scheme. Something to do with a Milkmaid's outfit and a stuffed Jersey cow! I refused to wear it!
    I've never tried the bread sack over the socks trick, but a friend who used them told me it works pretty well. You need to have at least one pair of dry socks to change into, tho.

  9. #69
    Boolit Buddy
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    For me I have the best luck in winter with the muck boots artic pro for everyday use. For extreme conditions or still activities I go with the custom Hoffman tall pacs with wool liners. I have an extra set of liners that I can change out with if needed should they ever get wet.

  10. #70
    Boolit Buddy
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    I like MUCK boots a size too big and a double layer of good socks. Of course that works for me but I'm in West texas. What's a snowmobile? (-:}

  11. #71
    Boolit Master Murphy's Avatar
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    My vote goes to Sorel boots with the felt liner. I worked the Alaskan pipeline in the 70's, the temps would be in the 50 below range. Order a 2nd pair of liners and keep them dry as spairs. Feet sweat a lot more than most folks realize and a little moisture in the liners can make the different between comfortable and misery.

    Good luck on your search.


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  12. #72
    Boolit Master murf205's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by M-Tecs View Post
    Tried a bunch and these are still the best https://www.charleyssurplus.com/bunn...h-chbbecw.html but beware the non GI ones are not close to the real ones.

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Genuine-M...aad3aa4490d85e
    You got that right. I spent the winter on the North Slope of Alaska on the shore of the Artic ocean during the Trans Alaskan Pipeline and when it gets COLD- really cold- this is the go to boot. It kept a kid from the deep south from freezing his feet (and another couple of lower extremities) off. The Sorels were fine till it got below about 10 degrees but after that it was time for the bunny boots, for me anyway.
    Last edited by murf205; 01-15-2019 at 10:31 PM.
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  13. #73
    Boolit Master Randy C's Avatar
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    https://www.gemplers.com/product/139...ager-Overshoes
    They have them insulated if its real cold,-10F or colder, I worked 10yrs in ND 25 to 65 below these work, Ive spent more money than most make in several months, not any more these work there light and easy to slip over your shoes water proof.
    Sorels cant compare, I gave them away along with all the other 300$ boots.

    They use to carry Heat brand insoles for regular boots there was a insert that slipped out of the toe and hand warmers fit in them they were made out of a product that kept the cold from coming up through yours soles of your boots they work i still have some new in the pac from last year.
    Last edited by Randy C; 01-15-2019 at 10:47 PM.

  14. #74
    i wear usgi mickeys there a little heavy but they are warm

  15. #75
    Boolit Buddy curioushooter's Avatar
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    I do lot live in an extremely cold climate, but I sometimes hunt in the 20s which is brutal for sitting still. I can shovel snow or move around in sub zero conditions with much less boot and be fine.

    I am also 100% convinced that leather sucks. No matter how much oil you rub in they are not going to be waterproof. Once your feet get wet, they will get cold. I've had wet grass soak my feet in the morning only to suffer for the rest of the day. I know that rubber works against water...they are the farm boots that have served me for years, but they are really lacking in warmth and comfort.

    Good thing Leon Leanwood Bean figured this out a century ago. I have been well served by old LLBean "Insulated Maine Hunting Shoes" (boots) with Vibram outsoles (not the lame regular soles these often have) and shearling insoles. These have insulation stuffed between the insole and the outsole, which slows the heat transfer out the bottom and they are totally water proof up the the leather stitching. They are also about as comfortable as regular leather boots.
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    It's also important to realize that socks are just as important as the boots. Some people swear by polypropalene skiing sock liners. I think they are rubbish. I just wear FoxRiver wool heavyweight boot socks. Sometimes these are found at Tractor Supply under a different brand name. They cost about $15 a pair normally but mid winter and end of winter they are often discounted for as little as $6-7 which is when I buy them. The medium mens size fit women, too (basically subtract 2-3 to convert men's to women's shoe size). Most women's socks are an absolute joke.

    My father in law and brother in law both have those silly surplus "mickey boots." They are almost too warm. I think they were designed for artic conditions. Result being your feet sweat and now are wet. He is always complaining about them too. Good thing my feet are smaller so he can't "borrow" my beans!
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    Last edited by curioushooter; 01-25-2019 at 02:26 PM.

  16. #76
    Boolit Buddy
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    I always used white usgi mickeys there relatively cheap, just get the size you can fit in with both thin and heavy wool socks. the balloon like size on the bottom helps walking on snow a bit. if that's not enough for someone id just think you need heated socks, still be much cheaper than high end boots.

  17. #77
    Boolit Buddy Markopolo's Avatar
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    Ok, I ain’t gunna read 4 pages of boots, but I will say Bunny Boots are the ONLY way for artic conditions..

    Click image for larger version. 

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    They are under 100 bucks, and are also used by the military and have been for a very long time because they just work. I have strayed to muck artic, Irish setters, and you name it, but bunny boots are true artic condition boots. If your in 40 below and beyond, do this. All of the snow machine folks use them, I use them, and although I live in SE Alaska now, I “LIVED” in the artic, not for just a season for work, but day in and out. Get these.

    Snowmobiles are what lower 48 folks call what many Alaskans call SnowMachines. A bulk of Alaska can only be reached by this primary mode of transportation. I once saw an 80 year old woman brave -50f temps in 60MPH winds to travel 180 miles one way in the dark on a snowmachine through the wilds, just to play bingo. When the games were over, she put her bunnyboots back on and was GONE... I asked her about it a few days later and she looked at me as if to say Soooo??? Way sturdier then me, that’s for sure..

    Marko
    Last edited by Markopolo; 01-25-2019 at 12:20 AM.
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  18. #78
    Boolit Master murf205's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markopolo View Post
    Ok, I ain’t gunna read 4 pages of boots, but I will say Bunny Boots are the ONLY way for artic conditions..

    Click image for larger version. 

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    They are under 100 bucks, and are also used by the military and have been for a very long time because they just work. I have strayed to muck artic, Irish setters, and you name it, but bunny boots are true artic condition boots. If your in 40 below and beyond, do this. All of the snow machine folks use them, I use them, and although I live in SE Alaska now, I “LIVED” in the artic, not for just a season for work, but day in and out. Get these.

    Snowmobiles are what lower 48 folks call what many Alaskans call SnowMachines. A bulk of Alaska can only be reached by this primary mode of transportation. I once saw an 80 year old woman brave -50f temps in 60MPH winds to travel 180 miles one way in the dark on a snowmachine through the wilds, just to play bingo. When the games were over, she put her bunnyboots back on and was GONE... I asked her about it a few days later and she looked at me as if to say Soooo??? Way sturdier then me, that’s for sure..

    Marko
    Ditto that. When you are serious about keeping your feet from freezing, these are the boots
    IT AINT what ya shoot--its how ya shoot it

  19. #79
    By all means, look at Steger Muk Luks, in Ely, Minnesota.
    I have two pairs. By far the warmest boots I've ever put on my feet. Waterproof And with NO SOCKS!
    They are rated for -30F. Mine come up to my knees so deep snow is not an issue.
    I've never had them in that extreme temperatures but have had them to -15F (wind chill)
    They are in your price range and I in my humble opinion well worth the money.
    Take a look at their site.
    Last edited by sailcaptain; Yesterday at 06:45 PM. Reason: Corrections

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