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Thread: carrying bullets?

  1. #1

    carrying bullets?

    Kind of new to ML, I picked up a Lyman Great Plains Hunter a while back. I have shot it a bit and am trying to figure out how to carry all the parts and pieces to make it go bang while in the woods

    I see many use a "possibles bag", ......which I am still wrestling with the idea of walking around the woods with a purse over my shoulder. I am thinking maybe fanny pack, or vest with pockets or something, but I am curious what you keep the projectiles in, in your possibles bag.

    I ordered a 54 caliber 450 grain conical mold, poured a hundred chunks of lead, and lubed them with Bens Red Bullet lube. They are kind of sticky to deal with, and figure that lube will pick up debris if I dont put them in something. What do you put the projectiles in when you are hunting to keep them clean and in one place? I am thinking a pill bottle from the pharmacy to keep them clean and organized. Somebody has to have already invented this wheel??? Looking for suggestions.

  2. #2
    Boolit Master
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    do you know someone that has to test their blood sugar? the little tubes the test strips come in are good for what you want to do. or you could make a extra thick bullet board. that would also act as a false muzzle for loading the bullets straight.

  3. #3
    Boolit Buddy
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    Look on the post here on this forum, where they are asking about powder measure, etc for BH 209, one or two spaces away, Metricmonkeywrench posted some pics of speedloaders, which you put your conical in nosefirst, in the bottom, then open the top and put your powder in, that you pre measure. I use a T type shortstarter with enough length from the t handle, to push the conical down thru the speedloader, and into the barrel about 2 inches, then take your t short starter out and ram the bullet in as far as it will go, then finish up with your ramrod. You can reload remarkably quick with one of these set ups.They butler creek type also have a little compartment on each end cap, that will carry a #11 cap. I always carry some patches, cleaning jag on the end of my ramrod, a worm in case a cleaning patch comes off, a capper with 12 caps in it and some extra in a tin inside my little fanny pack. I carry 4 or 5 with me, and have only had to use more than one once, when I got a double, and reloaded after the second shot, with 2 deer down. I always load my muzzleloader back up whenever I have shot a deer, sometimes they can come back to themselves, for a short distance, or so I have been told. With a TC Hawken 1" barrel on a Renegade stock, 28" barrel, I took 45 deer, using Hornady GP 425 grs HP's and Lyman 450 gr Plains bullet that I molded, with 105 grs of 2ffg holy black. I have taken deer out to 200yds with this, most only went a short distance, 26" or so straight down!! Pm me if ican be of any more help!

  4. #4
    Boolit Master
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    Figured a cigar tube would work well for lubed conicals. Maybe a cardboard dime roll would work. If not single conicals in a ziplock back, though them jostling might deform them slightly. Maybe the plastic speedloaders with a cap on each end would fit them.

    For paper cartridges (revolver) I use small ring cigar tins. Paper cartridges might work nicely for this as well.

  5. #5
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by koger View Post
    Look on the post here on this forum, where they are asking about powder measure, etc for BH 209, one or two spaces away, Metricmonkeywrench posted some pics of speedloaders, which you put your conical in nosefirst, in the bottom, then open the top and put your powder in, that you pre measure. I use a T type shortstarter with enough length from the t handle, to push the conical down thru the speedloader, and into the barrel about 2 inches, then take your t short starter out and ram the bullet in as far as it will go, then finish up with your ramrod. You can reload remarkably quick with one of these set ups.
    If this is the typical two ended muzzleloader speed loader I’m curious how you keep the powder from getting all over the lube and over the projectile. I figured I’d only keep the powder in mine once I work out an accurate load.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master Dan Cash's Avatar
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    Go to the thrift store and look at women's purses. You will find some really good LEATHER purses for
    $5 to 20 bucks which will serve your purpose. No alteration required. Pill bottles will solve your bullet and powder transport. Use a separate bottlw for pre measured charge or ---- use a powder flask with measure.
    To paraphrase Ronald Reagan, the trouble with many shooting experts is not that they're ignorant; its just that they know so much that isn't so.

  7. #7
    Boolit Master
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    hit the Wal-Mart sports aisle. lots of options

  8. #8
    Boolit Man arcticap's Avatar
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    Prevent rattles

    I try to keep objects from rattling around to a minimum by placing buffer material in a container with the bullets, such as plastic wrap, sandwich bags, patch cloth etc...
    The same for loose percussion caps and ramrod attachments that are placed inside of a tin or plastic container.
    Bind any noisy plastic containers together with rubber bands.

    I'll also wrap twist ties around metal zipper handles, whether the zippers are on a coat, possibles bag, hunting pants or chaps.
    The ties act as buffers that help prevent rattles when threaded between the zipper handle and the metal part that it attaches to.

    The same goes for any loose, potentially noisy objects that are in a fanny pack or possibles bag.
    I try to keep those items from rattling by separating them with a few cleaning rags or rubber gloves that can used to clean up blood after a deer is field dressed.

    If a ramrod causes rattles, then buffer the ferrules using a thin paperboard sleeve.
    If sling swivels make any noise then try to find a way to silence them using tape or whatever...
    If you can learn a way to cock your lock silently then that can help too.
    There's many ways to silence rattle noises to help to not rattle a deer at the wrong time...
    Last edited by arcticap; 10-10-2018 at 07:10 PM.

  9. #9
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    Is Ben's Red made for black powder? Some lubes don't work well with BP.

  10. #10
    Boolit Buddy Moleman-'s Avatar
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    The "speed loaders" is what I've always used. They keep the powder dry and the bullets dirt and debris free. They come in different calibers and different max powder volumes so pick accordingly.

  11. #11
    Boolit Master pietro's Avatar
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    .

    Correct for bore size speedloaders are fast, and have a boolitt diameter neck (just like a metallic cartridge case) that will accept the nose of the boolitt first, and most of the rest of the boolitt, up to covering the last lubrication groove - so there's no need to worry about powder getting in the boolitt lube unless you neglect to clean off any lube that gets smeared on the boolitt nose.



    To load a speedloader:

    * Push a lubed boolitt, nose first, into one end of the speedloader tube (preferably the small end, if it's not a straight tube), until almost the entire boolitt is enclosed within the speedloader, leaving only the last 1/8" (+/-) of the heel of the boolitt protruding (which helps during loading the rifle).

    * Pour a measured charge into the opposite end of the speedloader & cap it off. Done.




    Carry the loaded speedloaders in a pocket, in a haversack, a possibles bag, or a belt/fanny pack - YMMV, here. (I like to carry them so they're readily/fast accessible, to quickly reload the rifle)




    To load a rifle via speedloader:

    * First ensure the bore & ignition channel are clear (not necessarily clean), and that there's no cap on the nipple (if percussion).

    * Set the rifle in a vertical position, with the buttplate on your foot (or the ground),

    * Open the capped end of the speedloader & pour the powder charge downbore.

    * Reverse the speedloader & place it on the muzzle, locating it via letting the protruding boolitt heel into the bore - then hold it there until the boolitt is started into the bore fully, using either a short starter or the ramrod (held close to the muzzle/driving end.

    * Remove the short starter (or the RR), and remove the empty speedloader.

    * Using the RR, seat the boolitt downbore against the powder charge in one long/smooth stroke - Unless the bore's heavily fouled, there's no need to pound on the RR to seat the boolitt, just push down as hard as you can after you feel the boolitt stop against the powder charge. Done.

    * If percussion, cap the nipple, and you should be GTG.


    .
    Experience is a wonderful thing - It lets you recognize a mistake, when you make it again.

  12. #12
    Boolit Master
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    I have some old Butler creek speed loaders as well as something that's hard to describe, but both are "straight through" models. The Butler creek will hold two #11 caps, one on each end, the other is more or less a white tube with a red snap on cap on each end.

    A possibles bag doesn't take too much adjusting to carry. Just pull up your britches, tighten your belt and growl at anyone that gives you a sideways glance....

    BTW, I just use Crisco for BP boolit lube.... I have some other stuff that I've had for years, I think it's a Blue & Gray product. It worked well in a BP revolver, and occasionally used it on my Maxi Balls.

    I also found that Butler Creek Poly Patches were great! the older ones had a double cup, and I filled the bottom cup with lube. The newer ones were flat on the bottom. I don't know if they are made anymore or not.
    Tom
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  13. #13
    Boolit Buddy Shawlerbrook's Avatar
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    Ditto on the speed loaders! As far as a possibles bag you can go army surplus, flea market/ thrift store leather purse or a high end leather possibles bag.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by dondiego View Post
    Is Ben's Red made for black powder? Some lubes don't work well with BP.
    I have to admit I wasnt aware some lubes didnt like BP. I looked at the forum with lots of recipes, and dont know what drew me to Bens Red, but it was the one I chose and mixed up. Got a lifetime supply it looks like, unless I start lubing some other bullets.

  15. #15
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bait O' Eggs View Post
    I have to admit I wasnt aware some lubes didnt like BP. I looked at the forum with lots of recipes, and dont know what drew me to Bens Red, but it was the one I chose and mixed up. Got a lifetime supply it looks like, unless I start lubing some other bullets.
    Black powder tends to prefer natural lubes like beeswax and fats. Stay away from petroleum based lubes for BP. Some lubes cause the fouling to become hard and for BP you want to keep the fouling soft.

  16. #16
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    I would stay away from Ben's Red for BP - look at Emmerts or the more complicated Emmerts for BP if you want to make something. I use this for BP and all my pistol/revolver loading.
    Wayne the Shrink

    There is no 'right' that requires me to work for you or you to work for me!

  17. #17
    Boolit Master
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    Gatofeo’s #1 lube is what I use for felt wads, pistol bullets, and REALs for my rifle. Gatofeo found the recipe in a 1940’s (IIRC) gun magazine giving the recipe for a late 1800’s outside lubricated bullet recipe. It is said to also work as a patch lube, but I’ve not tried it yet.

    By weight:
    2 parts mutton tallow
    2 parts paraffin wax (Gulf Wax)
    1 part beeswax

  18. #18
    Boolit Man arcticap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bait O' Eggs View Post
    Kind of new to ML, I picked up a Lyman Great Plains Hunter a while back. I have shot it a bit and am trying to figure out how to carry all the parts and pieces to make it go bang while in the woods

    I see many use a "possibles bag", ......which I am still wrestling with the idea of walking around the woods with a purse over my shoulder. I am thinking maybe fanny pack, or vest with pockets or something, but I am curious what you keep the projectiles in, in your possibles bag.

    I ordered a 54 caliber 450 grain conical mold, poured a hundred chunks of lead, and lubed them with Bens Red Bullet lube. They are kind of sticky to deal with, and figure that lube will pick up debris if I dont put them in something. What do you put the projectiles in when you are hunting to keep them clean and in one place? I am thinking a pill bottle from the pharmacy to keep them clean and organized. Somebody has to have already invented this wheel??? Looking for suggestions.
    I can't imagine hunting with a traditional muzzle loader and not using some kind of a possibles bag and
    sometimes that doesn't even have enough room, and needs to be supplemented with a fanny pack.

    Perhaps when I first started hunting, I didn't realize all of the stuff that I would need to carry for contingencies.
    After a while I started carrying more and more items into the woods, as I think that many of us do as we buy more stuff.

    Whether it's a nipple wrench, ramrod accessories, ramrod handle, deer drag sling, rubber gloves, rags, powder, patches,
    caps and balls. mini flashight, ball starter, mallet, knife, compass, map, lighter, water bottle, the list can go on for some of us.
    Try to fit some of these necessities into pockets alone would be very difficult especially during a winter deer season in late December in the north
    with layers of winter clothes on including gloves, hat and maybe even a facemask too.

    A possibles bag becomes very comfortable resting on your buttside and serves an important purpose in the woods, not only for gun accessories,
    but for emergency survival items in case one gets injured or stuck in the woods after dark, and also to help field dress a deer,
    and to be able to get it back to the car and then into it.

    One time I couldn't lift the deer into the trunk by myself because it was too heavy. Luckily someone came by on a deadend road and helped me out.
    Another time I was able to call a warden to open a gated forest road to allow my car onto state land.
    Or else the additional drag to the parking lot would have been too much of a burden.


    That's when I finally bought a portable hoist with gambrel if someone isn't around to help.
    And also a deer sleigh to help drag deer more easily through the woods which I usually stash close to the general hunting area.

    Yep, when a muzzle loader hunter is alone in the woods, you can't always count on things going as planned.

    I once found a dead deer that I thought was maybe shot by another hunter, so I went to the nearest house to get some help or a warden
    to see if I should take the deer out of the woods or not.
    The home owner came into the woods with me to relocate the deer, and as it got dark we dragged it to his house, and he said that
    he knew the warden, would let him know about it and share some deer meat with me.
    When I spoke to him later, he found that the deer had been hit by a car and wandered back into the woods to die.
    He said that a lot of the meat was so hemorrhaged that it was not edible and only fit for dog food which I have no doubt was true.
    The point is that anything can happen in the woods and even a simple gun problem can ruin a hunt unexpectedly.
    It can depend on how deep into the woods a person is going, or if they get turned around and temporarily lost.
    But try dragging a big deer for a mile after shooting it, tracking it down and field dressing it, and then get it into your car without help,
    and we'll see if it's safer to be prepared than to not be.
    It can be exhausting without bringing enough water along.
    If you don't get your deer home, even in the dark, then the coyotes may end up eating it.
    Nowdays there's GPS units but I still don't have one.
    It's just another item to carry along with a smart phone which I also don't have.
    Last edited by arcticap; 10-11-2018 at 08:41 PM.

  19. #19
    Boolit Buddy
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    I found the Thompson Center 4-N-1 loader to be the best. The bullet has it's own chamber with the powder chamber acting as a plunger to start the bullet. It also holds a #11 cap.
    QUIS CUSTODIET IPSOS CUSTODES?

  20. #20
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    For a possibles bag something like an old Military Canvas Musette / Haversack bag might be a good answer. For round balls I've used "Ball Bags" to hold a bunch, usually those are leather so they might not be ideal for lubed conical bullets. A small pouch might be good to hold several speed loaders in a fast to locate place for when you want to reload in a hurry.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check