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Thread: Redding T-7 Turret

  1. #21
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    LUBEDUDE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petrol & Powder View Post
    Between the methods of using a turret press, I don't believe there's a wrong way. The advantage of a turret over a single stage is the fact that you don't have to screw the dies in and out of the turret. You install them, adjust them and leave them alone after that.
    While it's true that you can set the lock rings on the dies so that the dies can be returned to the same position when placed back in the press, it's easier if you don't have to play with the dies at all. The Hornady Lock-n-Load bushings come close to meeting the advantages of a turret but I think the turret still wins out by a slight margin.

    Clearly a turret press can be used to perform all of the loading operations on a single casing from start to finish by rotating the turret after each operation. However; I've never seen a turret press as an alternative to a true progressive press. If I'm going to use a press as a progressive press and take a spent casing through all of the steps to make a completed cartridge, I'm just going to buy a progressive press and call it a day.

    To me the strength of turret press is the ability to have the dies pre-adjusted and locked down on a turret. That turret is then used as a single stage press for operations in small batches for the times I don't want to use a progressive press.

    I think both methods have their merits. I also thing the Redding T-7 is one of the very best turret presses currently available as a new unit.
    Can’t disagree at all.

    I have 3 1050s, 2 550s, and a SDB. However, I spend more time on my Turrets because I enjoy the process and old school equipment.

    Now, if I’m in need of massive quantities for a match or am short on time, I jump on the progressives.
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  2. #22
    Boolit Bub
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    Quote Originally Posted by iShoot17 View Post
    I find this thread interesting. I had always imagined that using a turret press would lead someone to loading one round at a time, rather than in batch processing (sizing all 100 at once, seating all at once, etc.). If that would be the case, why not simply use a single stage press? I understand the ability to store multiple die sets in one place in a “set them and forget them” mentality, but wouldn’t it be just as fast to have dies set and use a single stage press (i.e. Co-ax)?

    With that said, I have looked into the T-7 quite extensively and would love to have one on my bench for a few specific calibers. Since I’d likely be using three dies sets, I would likely keep a powder measure on the toolhead, at least to start! However, I would be going with the load one complete round at a time route (at least that’s how I’m thinking now!).
    I agree...Single stage = batch. Turret = 1 rd at a time at 3-4x the output.

  3. #23
    Boolit Mold Nick Adams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LUBEDUDE View Post
    I currently use three different Hollywood Turret presses, while I do have others as well. How should you use your T-7? There is no “right” way, just the way that works for YOU.


    Hollywood Senior Turret

    I really love having the PM mounted on the press and as mdi says, use it as a semi progressive. I don’t remove the case until it has been made into a loaded round. I can safely and easily run 150-200 rounds an hour depending upon my mood.


    Hollywood Turret Tool, currently on other side of bench.

    Now I’m not loading precision rifle either. If I was, I would probably remove the PM and use the batch method. I mostly load for pistol and I am pleased with the quality of Ammo produced.

    * * * I recommend that you try multiple ways and see what is most comfortable for you and your needs.
    I have the Redding T-7, not the Hollywood, but that's pretty much how I use it.

    I have 7 different turret heads for the various cartridges I load, and two of them are for pistol cartridges. On those turrets I run the Lee Pro Auto PMs along with the various dies, and I get a finished round after one full rotation, like a semi-progressive. These turrets also hold at least two, and sometimes three, different bullet seater dies depending what bullet I want to load.

    The other 5 turrets hold dies for the rifle cartridges I load. But for those, I charge the cases with powder off the turret using one of my electronic powder chargers, like the RCBS ChargeMaster Lite. Those turrets, like the ones for pistol, might hold two or three seater dies set up for bullets of different weights and styles for the same cartridge.
    Underneath our starry, starry flag,
    We civilized 'em with a Krag.

  4. #24
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    OK guys, while it is true that you can use this tool anyway you choose the intended operation is the same as a turret lathe.

    The whole point of the turret is to do multiple operations to a workpiece without having to touch the workpiece. In this case a cartridge.

    So you could process that case by depriming and sizing, then prime, then index the turret and charge the case, index and seat the boolit, index, then crimp.

    Completed round in one handling.

    You only handle the case once going in and once coming out.

    This is the way that the tool was designed to be used. IE: taking each tool to the work.

    As opposed to Single Stage where you take the work to the tool.

    You can certainly use the tool as a single stage press, however you are really defeating the intended purpose of the tool by using it that way.

    None of this is new, it is simply the way that all "Rotary Transfer" machines work. Machines like C&H Auto Champs are "Linier Transfer Machines." meaning the tools are lined up in a strait line and the work is advanced thru the tools in a strait line form one side to the other.

    Hope this helps understanding.

    Randy
    "It's not how well you do what you know how to do,,,It's how well you do what you DON'T know how to do!"
    www.buchananprecisionmachine.com

  5. #25
    Boolit Buddy boatswainsmate's Avatar
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    Thanks again for all the advice and responses. Happy Shooting. Boats

  6. #26
    Boolit Master
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    I fully understand that the concept of a turret press is to move the tool around the workpiece instead of moving the workpiece around the tool. And I agree that's the intended application of a turret press.

    However, I've never really viewed a turret press as a true progressive press. A turret press is sort of an incomplete progressive press but it still has some real strengths.

    Because it's generally easier and faster to prime the casings off the press and to charge the casings with powder off the press, the turret press falls just a little short of being a complete progressive press. Yes, I know those operations can be done on the press.

    Years ago a friend had an old turret press and here's an example of the blended process with that turret (and I'm not claiming this is the best method):
    A batch of empty casings would be run through the sizing/decapping die and tossed into a container.
    They would then be pulled from the container and primed with a hand priming tool (Lee Auto-prime) and placed into a loading block as each one was primed.
    The loading block would be held under a bench mounted powder measure and each casing would be charged while remaining in the loading block. The entire block would just be repositioned and each casing filled in turn. When they were all charged, the casings would be visually inspected to insure that each one was charged and none were double charged.
    The turret was rotated so that the seating die was over the ram and a bullet would be seated in each casing and the cartridges placed in a container after the bullet was seated.
    The turret would be turned a final time to bring the crimp die over the ram and each casing would be crimped and the completed cartridge transferred to the final container.

    Again - NOT CLAIMING THIS IS THE BEST METHOD, just one method.

    It was very fast given the limitations of the equipment. And because the casing had to come out of the press to be primed and charged with powder anyway, it was still faster than rotating the turret through all of the stations for each individual round.
    YMMV
    Last edited by Petrol & Powder; 10-09-2018 at 07:24 PM.

  7. #27
    Boolit Buddy
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    I have used an old Lyman AA for a lot of years. I use it one round at a time. I prime on the press and drop powder on the press. My reason for this is I am frequently interrupted by my wife and I can stop after finishing the last round on the press and have finished whatever number of rounds I have done. If I load batch style, I may have to stop in the middle of a batch of cases only partly loaded with powder or at some other stage and still nothing I can shoot. Also, I can spend just a few minutes completely loading a few rounds rather than having to schedule time to complete an full batch. I can load a bit faster one at a time than batch loading as well. That's my way, YMMV. If I am in a hurry I use a Dillon 550 for hand gun rounds.

  8. #28
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    P&P the Turret Press is essentially a "Semi-Progressive Press." I had a PW Metal Matic II press which had the dies in fixed position and a shuttle with the shell holder that was moved under each station. In operation it was essentially a mirror image of a Turret Press.

    C&H has the 444 Pistol Champ where you move the case by hand between the stations. This is essentially the same as having 4 Single Stage presses lined up in a row in front of you.

    There are many variations of the theme.

    What you will see is that people tend to do things based on their understanding of the tools they have to use. Many people would never think of rotating the turret to complete each round one by one and especially if all they had ever used was a SS press. However people like me who have several turret lathes in my shop never thought of doing it any other way.

    I routinely F/L size and deprime .223's on my Rockchucker then Tumble to clean and then prime on my RCBS bench primer. Then they go to the D500B and I skip the first station and charge the case, seat the bullet and crimp in the "Progressive Manner" IE: one finished round with every pull of the handle.

    The difference between a Progressive Machine and a Turret Machine is the first one yields a finished round/part with every pull of the handle. The Turret Machine requires a pull of the handle for every operation done to the part.

    This all goes back to the progression of machine tools. First there was Engine Lathes, then somebody figured out you could put a Turret on the cross slide and do multiple operations to a part without handling the part, (a byproduct of that was all those operations would be concentric to each other because you never took the part out of the chuck.) This feature was beneficial to certain types of parts.

    Then came Screw Machines which were essentially automated turret lathes where all the operations were done until the part was finished then cut off and then the next part was made the same way. once again the tools were taken to the part.

    Then somebody came up with the Multi Spindle Screw Machine which was the first, and still is, the only Automated Progressive Turning Machine where a carousel with 5-8 spindles turns in the head stock and the tools are dispersed at all the stations that the carousel stops. Each station performs an operation to the part, then when the slowest one is done the carousel indexes, and all the tools start on the next part. The last station is the cutoff station where the completed part is separated from the bar, and then the bar is fed forward to a stop and the cycle repeats. Everytime the machine indexes the carousel a finished part is dropped. The cycle time for each part is the time for the slowest operation to complete.

    As a side note: our friend Dave Davidson of C&H still uses Multi Spindle Screw Machines to make his dies, and the C&H company was originally located in SoCal producing Aerospace parts and Reloading tools. SoCal(San Fernando Valley) was the epicenter of the Aerospace Industry from the 40's to the early 90's when CA became too much of a PITB (regulations) to do business and everybody moved to other places.

    Now the "Valley" is the epicenter of the Porn Industry, but it too is being regulated out of the area by stupid politicians who care only about their image and power. Soon all they will rule is a bunch of Mexicans who don't speak English, and only have the skills to mow your lawn.

    Hopefully change will come in a month?

    Randy
    "It's not how well you do what you know how to do,,,It's how well you do what you DON'T know how to do!"
    www.buchananprecisionmachine.com

  9. #29
    Boolit Bub
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petrol & Powder View Post
    I fully understand that the concept of a turret press is to move the tool around the workpiece instead of moving the workpiece around the tool. And I agree that's the intended application of a turret press.

    However, I've never really viewed a turret press as a true progressive press. A turret press is sort of an incomplete progressive press but it still has some real strengths.

    Because it's generally easier and faster to prime the casings off the press and to charge the casings with powder off the press, the turret press falls just a little short of being a complete progressive press. Yes, I know those operations can be done on the press.

    Years ago a friend had an old turret press and here's an example of the blended process with that turret (and I'm not claiming this is the best method):
    A batch of empty casings would be run through the sizing/decapping die and tossed into a container.
    They would then be pulled from the container and primed with a hand priming tool (Lee Auto-prime) and placed into a loading block as each one was primed.
    The loading block would be held under a bench mounted powder measure and each casing would be charged while remaining in the loading block. The entire block would just be repositioned and each casing filled in turn. When they were all charged, the casings would be visually inspected to insure that each one was charged and none were double charged.
    The turret was rotated so that the seating die was over the ram and a bullet would be seated in each casing and the cartridges placed in a container after the bullet was seated.
    The turret would be turned a final time to bring the crimp die over the ram and each casing would be crimped and the completed cartridge transferred to the final container.

    Again - NOT CLAIMING THIS IS THE BEST METHOD, just one method.

    It was very fast given the limitations of the equipment. And because the casing had to come out of the press to be primed and charged with powder anyway, it was still faster than rotating the turret through all of the stations for each individual round.
    YMMV
    The bold in your quote...where does that come from? It's factually opposite of my experience.

  10. #30
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillP View Post
    The bold in your quote...where does that come from? It's factually opposite of my experience.
    It comes from my personal experience.

    Using an "on-the-press" priming device usually requires handling individual primers. Dumping 100 primers into a hand priming tool and priming cases eliminates handling 100 small, position sensitive parts individually. Handling the larger casing as opposed to the smaller primer requires less dexterity and can generally be accomplished with greater speed.

    As for charging casings with powder, by leaving the casings in the loading block and moving the loading block instead of handling individual casings also takes advantage of the decreased need for dexterity.

    The overall savings in time to prime & charge a given number of casings is faster because there's less need to use fine motor skills.

    However, this doesn't hold true for all systems. If the press has some type automated priming system that doesn't require the handling of individual primers, the advantage switches back to the priming on the press.
    The same holds true if the powder measure is mounted directly on the press in a dedicated station.

  11. #31
    Boolit Buddy Wheelguns 1961's Avatar
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    The primer feed on my RCBS turret works great. My previous turret press was a lee and I had a safety prime system. I got sick of chasing primers all around the room. I imagine that is why alot of people prime off the press.
    Due to the price of primers, warning shots will no longer be given!

  12. #32
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    I've followed this thread from the beginning. I want a T-7 but haven't "pulled the trigger" so far. I just missed one when Bullets, Inc first advertised their Going Out of Business sale. This thread has me thinking about how I would use a T-7. My first thought was that I would batch things thru the operations. Next I thought that along with that I would add a fourth die for crimping. I've always had trouble adjusting the seat/crimp die. If someone will comment on this, please do. I've still got some more thinking to do.

    I have a 550b that I only load handgun rounds on but not the larger revolver cartridges such as .45 Colt or .475 Linebaugh and others in their class. Only those that justify a lot of ammunition.
    I will still load rifle rounds on either a single stage or the T-7, assuming that I break down and purchase one.
    John
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  13. #33
    Boolit Buddy Wheelguns 1961's Avatar
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    I don’t have a T-7, but I do have a RCBS. It has six holes. I use 5 of them for loading. The other hole I keep a bullet sizing die in. 1st hole deprime, size, prime. 2nd hole expander die, usually an M-die or universal expanding die with NOE inserts. 3rd hole powder thru die. I don’t use this for expanding, just a place for a funnel to dump powder into case. I measure powder with a chargemaster. 4th hole bullet seating die. I prefer to crimp separately also. 5th hole reading crimp die, either roll or taper. I load one at a time and average speed for 100 completed rounds is about 1hr 20min
    Due to the price of primers, warning shots will no longer be given!

  14. #34
    Boolit Buddy
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    My lyman AA only has 4 holes which to me is just right. #1 sizer and manually put a primer in the punch on the up stroke and prime on the down. #2 is the expander and powder through die with a Lee powder spitter on top. 3# is bullet seater. #4 is crimper. Left hand installs primers and bullets and rotates tool head and removes and installs new case. I can load 4 rounds per minute but am more comfortable at about 3 per minute. No wasted time turning turret past nonused holes. I have been using this press for about 40 years and each step is now automatic. If I am in a hurry to load a bunch I go to the Dillon 550 and can easily load 400 per hr, 500 can be done if primer tubes are full and I want to push things.
    Also I don't like handling cases after they have been powdered as I sometimes miss a bit when putting the case in the shell holder and don't like cleaning up the spilled powder especially the short cases that are about full of powder like 9mm. That brings up another issue, double charges. I have found they don't happen if you use a powder that fills more than 50% of the case.
    Last edited by rbuck351; 10-12-2018 at 08:21 PM.

  15. #35
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    the redding t-7 is the T-REX of turret presses, had one, shouldn't have sold it. that said, not a fan on on-press powder measures if real accuracy in dropped powder weights is desired. better doing that off-press, as i do with a harrell's culver.

  16. #36
    Boolit Master
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    Of all the turret presses available, the T-7 is close to the top of the list.

    It's very strong, has excellent access to the shell holder/casing, has 7 holes in the turret, has lots of leverage, extra turrets are readily available and Redding is a great company to deal with.

  17. #37
    Boolit Bub
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    I've been tempted to buy a T7 but don't really need another press for my shooting. Does the T7 primer feed system work as good as the Lyman/RCBS? It looks like Lyman just changed to that style with the Brass Smith.

    If I had to load primers one at a time into the press primer arm I would hand prime off the press instead. As it stands I use the Lyman/RCBS auto feed tubes and only have to load the tubes off the primer tray.

  18. #38
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillP View Post
    I've been tempted to buy a T7 but don't really need another press for my shooting. Does the T7 primer feed system work as good as the Lyman/RCBS? It looks like Lyman just changed to that style with the Brass Smith.

    If I had to load primers one at a time into the press primer arm I would hand prime off the press instead. As it stands I use the Lyman/RCBS auto feed tubes and only have to load the tubes off the primer tray.
    Redding does offer a priming system for the T-7 (for another $60) and it does eliminate the need to handle individual primers during the operation of the press.

    As much as I like the T-7, when you start adding priming devices, mounting powder measures to the press and other efforts to turn the press into a progressive press, you might as well buy a progressive press, IMO.

    The T-7 is an outstanding turret press, but like all turret presses, it falls just a little short of a true progressive press.
    It is however, an excellent supplement to a progressive press or a step up from a single stage press.

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petrol & Powder View Post
    Redding does offer a priming system for the T-7 (for another $60) and it does eliminate the need to handle individual primers during the operation of the press.

    As much as I like the T-7, when you start adding priming devices, mounting powder measures to the press and other efforts to turn the press into a progressive press, you might as well buy a progressive press, IMO.

    The T-7 is an outstanding turret press, but like all turret presses, it falls just a little short of a true progressive press.
    It is however, an excellent supplement to a progressive press or a step up from a single stage press.
    Thanks but I'm just interested in how well the REDDING primer accessory works on the T7. I'm fully aware of turret vs progressive...have loaded many rds on both types and none were the cheapo presses.

  20. #40
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    Priming system works fine on large primers. I have notice a few flipped primers with the small primers. All in all good set up

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