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Thread: Alliant Powder Reloader's Guide

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy

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    Alliant Powder Reloader's Guide

    Maybe everyone knew this already but when I run across something "free" I make a deal out of it! You can download the guide or order a printed guide that covers all their powders for a variety of calibers...

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    “To achieve victory we must mass our forces at the hub of all power and movement. The enemy’s "center of gravity”

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    Boolit Master
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    I had one from a couple years ago, but had forgotten to check for a new one. Thanks!


    Just one more loading reference book to have handy.


    Here is a link for those who would wish to order one:
    http://www.alliantpowder.com/resources/catalog.aspx
    2nd Amend./U.S. Const. - "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

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    Thanks JB for the link.
    Steve,

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    The link is embedded in the image also.

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    “To achieve victory we must mass our forces at the hub of all power and movement. The enemy’s "center of gravity”

    ― Karl Von Clausewitz

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    Thanks, I ordered a hard copy.

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    Just ordered a hard copy thanks for the link

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    You can find their manuals dating back to 1987 if you search. It’s not hard to find them. I have 129 manuals across many manufacturers in my Dropbox account. This folder is backed up a lot of places as I consider it’s information invaluable. You can never have enough load manuals.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dragon813gt View Post
    You can find their manuals dating back to 1987 if you search. It’s not hard to find them. I have 129 manuals across many manufacturers in my Dropbox account. This folder is backed up a lot of places as I consider it’s information invaluable. You can never have enough load manuals.
    I agree but here comes a question I've been wanting to ask for a while... The benefit of having a lot of manuals I would think is to have many more "options", but what do you do when some load data contradicts other? Is it because "manual x" didn't test what "manual z" tested? Or is it a manner of agreeance among a host of manuals? (I know that might be a lame question)

    “To achieve victory we must mass our forces at the hub of all power and movement. The enemy’s "center of gravity”

    ― Karl Von Clausewitz

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dieselhorses View Post
    I agree but here comes a question I've been wanting to ask for a while... The benefit of having a lot of manuals I would think is to have many more "options", but what do you do when some load data contradicts other? Is it because "manual x" didn't test what "manual z" tested? Or is it a manner of agreeance among a host of manuals? (I know that might be a lame question)
    No load manual can tell you what the pressure in your gun is going to be. So right off the bat there’s a discrepancy. The reason to own old manuals is because powders are routinely discontinued. So you need the old ones to have any data. SR4759 is a prime example of a recently discontinued powder where you need older manuals for loads. I use Green Dot for pistol loads and you need older Alliant manuals to find this data.

    As far as discrepancies go it can be caused by a few things. The main one is we have better testing equipment now where you can see the actual pressure curve. This has rendered old loads that were considered safe to now be unsafe. One of the others is just different testing parameters. A gun change is going to change the results. A primer change is going to change the results. I don’t consult all my Alliant manuals when working up a load. I will pull a few and compare.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dragon813gt View Post
    No load manual can tell you what the pressure in your gun is going to be. So right off the bat there’s a discrepancy. The reason to own old manuals is because powders are routinely discontinued. So you need the old ones to have any data. SR4759 is a prime example of a recently discontinued powder where you need older manuals for loads. I use Green Dot for pistol loads and you need older Alliant manuals to find this data.

    As far as discrepancies go it can be caused by a few things. The main one is we have better testing equipment now where you can see the actual pressure curve. This has rendered old loads that were considered safe to now be unsafe. One of the others is just different testing parameters. A gun change is going to change the results. A primer change is going to change the results. I don’t consult all my Alliant manuals when working up a load. I will pull a few and compare.
    Makes sense, thank you. A while back I was trying to see if I could "Red dot" to work with 9mm. I was told that I could reference the old "Hercules" data for this but never got around to trying it.

    “To achieve victory we must mass our forces at the hub of all power and movement. The enemy’s "center of gravity”

    ― Karl Von Clausewitz

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dieselhorses View Post
    Makes sense, thank you. A while back I was trying to see if I could "Red dot" to work with 9mm. I was told that I could reference the old "Hercules" data for this but never got around to trying it.
    I use Red Dot quite a bit & as a matter of fact, I have 150 - 9mm cases sitting on my bench along with a pound of Red Dot waiting for me to start. I hope to have them done by tomorrow. { Been ill with a chest cold & not up to doing it for a few days or they would have already been done}

    Just so ya know, I used comparable load data from modern Alliant Bullseye to find the starting loads, starting with just a few tenths of a grain below the Starting loads for BE , then worked up from there to get what I needed for load data using Red Dot, since they are similar in burn rates & pressure. {Promo would be another I could do this with using BE.}

    I am not recommending doing this to you or anyone else, but am mentioning it so folks are aware of it. Any risk is assumed by the person who "experiments", not the ones who have "experimented" before and mention results, or just mention an idea about something that might be tried. You do something, it is YOUR responsibility, not anyone elses. < Disclaimer...
    2nd Amend./U.S. Const. - "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

    "A man ought ta do what he thinks is best" - "Hondo" Lane.(John Wayne)

    "If ya don't like my gate, ya don't have to swing on the hinges..." - L. Ackerman ( RIP)

    Enforce the Immigration laws & deport the illegal aliens. Quit fooling around!

    ~~ WWG1WGA ~~

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    So comparatively Bullseye and Red Dot are like w296 and H110, HP-38 and W231? Just wondering since I have about 12 lbs. of it.

    “To achieve victory we must mass our forces at the hub of all power and movement. The enemy’s "center of gravity”

    ― Karl Von Clausewitz

  13. #13
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    I ordered one of these about a year ago,I have used it and then ordered one for each of my sons who reload.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dieselhorses View Post
    So comparatively Bullseye and Red Dot are like w296 and H110, HP-38 and W231? Just wondering since I have about 12 lbs. of it.
    In a way. I hesitate to offer much more than I have already. All I am offering is that there are ways to find components that are similar or almost the same in how they do what they are supposed to do, and may be substituted on occasion with the correct application. Research before experimentation, is always best, of course.

    Some here might answer your questions directly. I am not going to do that on this sort of a subject. My suggestion is to research & follow what you find in current reloading manuals for current powders & if you have some older powders & older manuals you MAY POSSIBLY find that the older manuals have some of the answers you are searching for when you do the research on these types of things. The comparisons may hold true for modern powders as they did with older manuals. Meaning, if a load of one type of powder was comparable in amount to another type of powder with the same projectile & the same pressure/velocity in an older manual load data, it may be the same in a newer manual(& for the same powder(s)), even if the newer manuals do not list the same powders as the older manual.

    As a type of example... If Powder A for a 115gr. bullet/boolit for a 9mm, and Powder B is in the same list of data for some caliber/barrel/etc., in an older manual & they show comparable spread in grains from Start load to Max load, as well as a corresponding velocity & pressure using the same components, and when you go to a newer manual that only lists Powder B & lacks Powder A, but the load data is much the same as the older manual for Powder B, then it is possible that the Powder A may still be comparable, but just was not listed in that newer manual for some reason or the other.

    That is when a person has to do some more research to see if they can find loads that have been listed in the older manual as well as the newer manual for other calibers, barrel lengths & such, but also list the Powder A & Powder B in the tested powder load lists to see if they still compare in those other lists.

    If a person finds that the data has not changed much, then that person can decide on whether or not a person can use the newer data the same as was comparable to the older manual data.

    Perhaps one needs to drop the Start load a bit, or perhaps raise it a bit to test the Powder A or B to see if they compare in velocity on a chronograph and discover if the one or the other are compatible.

    That is as far as I wish to go in typing or describing methods that some folks use to do this sort of thing.

    I do not recommend anything but to follow the modern load data for whatever modern firearm & modern components anyone wishes to use for reloading. Anyone who goes beyond that recommendation assumes all risk for not following the recommended loads in the manual that they are using... I m not promoting other than what the manuals suggest for safety concerns. I have only described some things that may be done if someone wishes to NOT follow those safety recommendations, and do so at THEIR OWN RISK.

    G'Luck in your 9mm casting & loading!
    2nd Amend./U.S. Const. - "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

    "A man ought ta do what he thinks is best" - "Hondo" Lane.(John Wayne)

    "If ya don't like my gate, ya don't have to swing on the hinges..." - L. Ackerman ( RIP)

    Enforce the Immigration laws & deport the illegal aliens. Quit fooling around!

    ~~ WWG1WGA ~~

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dieselhorses View Post
    So comparatively Bullseye and Red Dot are like w296 and H110, HP-38 and W231? Just wondering since I have about 12 lbs. of it.
    No. I’m assuming you’re asking if the powders are the same just labeled differently. They are not. If you’re asking if the relationship between burn speed is the same between RD/BE and H110/231 they are not. H110/W296 is a slow burning magnum pistol powder. HP38/W231, RD and BE are all fast burning pistol powders.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dragon813gt View Post
    No. I’m assuming you’re asking if the powders are the same just labeled differently. They are not. If you’re asking if the relationship between burn speed is the same between RD/BE and H110/231 they are not. H110/W296 is a slow burning magnum pistol powder. HP38/W231, RD and BE are all fast burning pistol powders.
    10-4, I was comparing individually, not against each pair.

    “To achieve victory we must mass our forces at the hub of all power and movement. The enemy’s "center of gravity”

    ― Karl Von Clausewitz

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    I just order one I like the hard copy that way I always have it in hand and do not need to depend on a computer. I get it that way I see what have change and what have not and what is new.I still use the old data I been usen . I get it just in case for the times to come have some thing to look back on.I had order others in the past from them.I always on the look out for the free ones.I put them with all the others I have.
    Life Member of NRA,NTA,DAV ,ITA. Also member of FTA,CBA

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBinMN View Post
    In a way. I hesitate to offer much more than I have already. All I am offering is that there are ways to find components that are similar or almost the same in how they do what they are supposed to do, and may be substituted on occasion with the correct application. Research before experimentation, is always best, of course.

    Some here might answer your questions directly. I am not going to do that on this sort of a subject. My suggestion is to research & follow what you find in current reloading manuals for current powders & if you have some older powders & older manuals you MAY POSSIBLY find that the older manuals have some of the answers you are searching for when you do the research on these types of things. The comparisons may hold true for modern powders as they did with older manuals. Meaning, if a load of one type of powder was comparable in amount to another type of powder with the same projectile & the same pressure/velocity in an older manual load data, it may be the same in a newer manual(& for the same powder(s)), even if the newer manuals do not list the same powders as the older manual.

    As a type of example... If Powder A for a 115gr. bullet/boolit for a 9mm, and Powder B is in the same list of data for some caliber/barrel/etc., in an older manual & they show comparable spread in grains from Start load to Max load, as well as a corresponding velocity & pressure using the same components, and when you go to a newer manual that only lists Powder B & lacks Powder A, but the load data is much the same as the older manual for Powder B, then it is possible that the Powder A may still be comparable, but just was not listed in that newer manual for some reason or the other.

    That is when a person has to do some more research to see if they can find loads that have been listed in the older manual as well as the newer manual for other calibers, barrel lengths & such, but also list the Powder A & Powder B in the tested powder load lists to see if they still compare in those other lists.

    If a person finds that the data has not changed much, then that person can decide on whether or not a person can use the newer data the same as was comparable to the older manual data.

    Perhaps one needs to drop the Start load a bit, or perhaps raise it a bit to test the Powder A or B to see if they compare in velocity on a chronograph and discover if the one or the other are compatible.

    That is as far as I wish to go in typing or describing methods that some folks use to do this sort of thing.

    I do not recommend anything but to follow the modern load data for whatever modern firearm & modern components anyone wishes to use for reloading. Anyone who goes beyond that recommendation assumes all risk for not following the recommended loads in the manual that they are using... I m not promoting other than what the manuals suggest for safety concerns. I have only described some things that may be done if someone wishes to NOT follow those safety recommendations, and do so at THEIR OWN RISK.

    G'Luck in your 9mm casting & loading!
    JB thanks for your input! The few years I've been loading and casting I've done so cautiously. Complacency is the demon that haunts many reloaders. If you are in the business for 50 years and have absolutely no doubts, questions or not leery about just one thing, something is wrong. There are more variables in this passion than the sand on the beach!

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G870A using Tapatalk

    “To achieve victory we must mass our forces at the hub of all power and movement. The enemy’s "center of gravity”

    ― Karl Von Clausewitz

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check