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Thread: How to remove real old masking tape ?

  1. #21
    Boolit Master pietro's Avatar
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    .

    I use oil, soaked into the tape with a small brush for a day or two, then gently scrape with a wooden popsicle stick or wider tongue depressor (WallyWorld - $3/pack).

    The sides of the popsicle stick can be used as is; but I much prefer cutting both ends off with a razor blade, leaving a chisel edge at a 45-degree angle (It can be done with a single cut, via holding the single-edge blade at the proper compound angle).

    Alternatively, the stick can be simply cut into a chisel edge 90-degrees to the length of the stick.



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    Experience is a wonderful thing - It lets you recognize a mistake, when you make it again.

  2. #22
    Boolit Master
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    I would go with 0000 steel wool after a light moistening with mineral spirits. WD40 is mostly mineral spirits, and what isn’t won’t be helpful anyway.

    Heat is a great help with adhesives, but once they are thoroughly dried you may need more heat than the finish will tolerate.

    I would strip, repair, and refinish, but I understand your reluctance to do so.

  3. #23
    Boolit Master


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    No to the instant glues if you value the gun. No to refinishing it if it has value. There are ways to repair the cracks but they take a lot of time
    Don't buy nuthing you can't take home

    Joel 3:10

  4. #24
    Boolit Master Tripplebeards's Avatar
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    I just got done cleaning goo off my scope tube with rubbing alcohol. Works every time and dries leaving no film when done.

    The steam and heat method sounds like a great idea as well.

  5. #25
    Boolit Master

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    Oils lift and soften most tape adhesives but if you want to glue after then they might be a problem. Mineral spirits has a very light oil to it so might affect glues. Alcohol will remove tape may take several applications do to the speed of evaporation the only residue this will leave is from the tapes adhesive. Finish should be okay with alcohol also.

    If the cracks can be pulled together tight gluing can be invisible when done. If not the glue dosnt finish the same as wood and an good eye can spot it.

    I would spread crack open if possible and work glue in blow in as deep as possible with a rubber tipped blow gun on an air compressor and clamp tight, The blow gun gets the glue deep into the crack for best penetration. Super glue may cure before you get it clamped tight. ALso super glue isn't as good on porus surfaces aince it soaks in and donst bond as good. THe old wood in the stock is dry and will soak up doing this.

  6. #26
    Boolit Master redhawk0's Avatar
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    Hopefully the finish isn't Shellac based....if it is, Alcohol WILL effect it. Being as old as 160 years...it could very well have some shellac on it. I'd try to find some in conspicuous place to test it with Alcohol first before just giving it a good soaking on the tape.

    If its varnish based it will not be effected. As for the crack....if it pulls up tight then use a high quality "Exterior" yellow or white wood glue. After pulling it together with wood clamps, remove excess squeeze out with a damp sponge. If you have a gap...no matter what you do it will show. Try one of the urethane expanding glues to fill the gap and provide a strong bond. But...it won't stain the same as the wood if there is a gap. What I would do in this case is still use the expanding glue, then when it dries carve out a slight recess in the gap below the surface of the wood, then using ultrafine sawdust and white wood glue make a paste that you can smear into the recess gap. This can then be gently sanded smooth to the surface of the stock and stain and finish applied to it. It won't make it completely invisible but it will be less noticeable than just a gap of glue.

    redhawk

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  7. #27
    Boolit Master
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    Well, first, is it something you would consider valuable or an 'antique'. If it is I would not touch it. Take it to a pro. Much of what is discussed here might ruin any value it has.

    If not, then the difficult part is fixing the cracks. How did they start? Was there impact damage of some sort or did the stock split due to age? If due to age then I agree with the fill method of 'fixing' it.

    I would fix the cracks first, then worry about the masking tape residue. That way you won't get any of those chemicals in the cracks and prevent adhesion.

  8. #28
    Moderator Emeritus / Trusted loob groove dealer


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    Quote Originally Posted by charlie b View Post
    Well, first, is it something you would consider valuable or an 'antique'. If it is I would not touch it. Take it to a pro. Much of what is discussed here might ruin any value it has.

    If not, then the difficult part is fixing the cracks. How did they start? Was there impact damage of some sort or did the stock split due to age? If due to age then I agree with the fill method of 'fixing' it.

    I would fix the cracks first, then worry about the masking tape residue. That way you won't get any of those chemicals in the cracks and prevent adhesion.
    I based my suggestion on over 30 years of restoration work, and having built over 500 firearms.
    The solid soft lead bullet is undoubtably the best and most satisfactory expanding bullet that has ever been designed. It invariably mushrooms perfectly, and never breaks up. With the metal base that is essential for velocities of 2000 f.s. and upwards to protect the naked base, these metal-based soft lead bullets are splendid.
    John Taylor - "African Rifles and Cartridges"

    Forget everything you know about loading jacketed bullets. This is a whole new ball game!


  9. #29
    Boolit Master scattershot's Avatar
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    Second the GooGone. Itís basically lemon oil, and should remove the tape residue.
    "Experience is a series of non-fatal mistakes"


    Disarming is a mistake free people only get to make once...

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check