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Thread: Marlin 39M receiver damage

  1. #21
    Boolit Master
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    Have the parts changer send it to powersmetalworks.com to fix his screwup.

  2. #22
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Preacher Jim View Post
    Leadhead I am rebuilding a model 19-2 Smith the same type fellow used his crescent wrench to remove and try to replace barrel. I bought it as junk but now about to become a shooter.
    That's cool. I've bought some less than pretty pieces to refinish and use, myself. There is a real sense of satisfaction in taking an abused gun and transforming it back to beauty. The latest one is a Smith 48 no-dash that someone left wrapped in a cloth in Florida humidity, and while I haven't yet sent it for a re-bluing I hope to be able to do so before long.

  3. #23
    Boolit Master marlinman93's Avatar
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    I've had worse tig welded and then draw filed and rust blued again. It's a shame it happened, but it can be fixed to look like new by the right person. I'd send the barreled action (minus wood) to Al Springer at Snowy Mountain Blue, and Al will make it look original again. Hopefully the "gunsmith" is good for his word, and will make it right by paying for the welding and repairs.

    http://smbgunrestorations.com/

  4. #24
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    I would leave the gun with the smith, and let him make it right, one way or the other. Replace or repair.
    The solid soft lead bullet is undoubtably the best and most satisfactory expanding bullet that has ever been designed. It invariably mushrooms perfectly, and never breaks up. With the metal base that is essential for velocities of 2000 f.s. and upwards to protect the naked base, these metal-based soft lead bullets are splendid.
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  5. #25
    Boolit Master Texas by God's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Preacher Jim View Post
    Leadhead I am rebuilding a model 19-2 Smith the same type fellow used his crescent wrench to remove and try to replace barrel. I bought it as junk but now about to become a shooter.
    Sounds like a good thread idea.

  6. #26
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    Yeah, with "before", "during" and "after" pics, of course.

  7. #27
    Boolit Master
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    It certainly looks like the mark of the use of a large cresent wrench to remove the action from the bbl.
    It's not all that uncommon a practice even in shops where you'd think they'd know better.

    I worked in one of the best restoration shops in the country ( you know the name) and what did they use to remove the Model 97/39 action with?..
    A big *** Craftsman cresent wrench. Plus if the bbl was an octagon, they didn't even bother with the regular bbl vise. Just a wrap of leather and tighten it in an equally as large machinests vise with smooth jaws.
    Get 'er done....

    They hated my careful approach with the proper tools,,,took too much time.
    Any damage or marks could always be 'fixed up' with the 'Orange Monster' (the antiquated TIG machine at the time). This goes back some years. They probably have learned a few lessons by now.

    This M39 can be fixed..it's cosmetic damage.
    Since no metal appears to have been removed,,just displaced,,you'd be surprised what can be done by simple peening and punch work to move that metal back into place.
    It will require polishing and refinishing afterwards of course. It may need some careful weld touchup in addition to that.
    It all depends on how bad the displacement is and how good the restoration person is.

    Not a loss by any stretch. Just needs a careful hand and some work.

    ..and get rid of those cresent wrenches around the gunshop.

    If they don't want to do that, or can't,,then they in the least own you a same vintage M39 in the same condition you started out with,,straight accross trade.
    It ain't the same as the orig. But the orig isn't the orig anymore either and sometimes you just have to pick up and start over again.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2152hq View Post
    It certainly looks like the mark of the use of a large cresent wrench to remove the action from the bbl.
    It's not all that uncommon a practice even in shops where you'd think they'd know better.

    I worked in one of the best restoration shops in the country ( you know the name) and what did they use to remove the Model 97/39 action with?..
    A big *** Craftsman cresent wrench. Plus if the bbl was an octagon, they didn't even bother with the regular bbl vise. Just a wrap of leather and tighten it in an equally as large machinests vise with smooth jaws.
    Get 'er done....

    They hated my careful approach with the proper tools,,,took too much time.
    Any damage or marks could always be 'fixed up' with the 'Orange Monster' (the antiquated TIG machine at the time). This goes back some years. They probably have learned a few lessons by now.

    This M39 can be fixed..it's cosmetic damage.
    Since no metal appears to have been removed,,just displaced,,you'd be surprised what can be done by simple peening and punch work to move that metal back into place.
    It will require polishing and refinishing afterwards of course. It may need some careful weld touchup in addition to that.
    It all depends on how bad the displacement is and how good the restoration person is.

    Not a loss by any stretch. Just needs a careful hand and some work.

    ..and get rid of those cresent wrenches around the gunshop.

    If they don't want to do that, or can't,,then they in the least own you a same vintage M39 in the same condition you started out with,,straight accross trade.
    It ain't the same as the orig. But the orig isn't the orig anymore either and sometimes you just have to pick up and start over again.
    Yeah, I hear ya. Gonna have to discuss it with my son to see what he would consider to be fair in the event the smith comes up with a plan. He's a pretty level-headed kid, but it IS his first rifle and it's very doubtful he'll be very fond of the idea of swapping it for a totally different gun. When I bought it from a friend, I had to completely refinish the stock and do some touchup bluing before gifting it to my son. He and I both knew the barrel would need replaced eventually so that didn't bother him, but it's highly likely that he'll always want to hang on to his "first" rifle for sentimental reasons.

  9. #29
    Boolit Master
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    Not so much a crescent wrench,damage is caused by using too small a wrench.....if he had used a biggie,the points of the jaws would have been well clear of the receiver.....I have them up to 3 ft,used to have a bigger one,but a guy really wanted it for the (gasp) mancave.

  10. #30
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    ...I have them up to 3 ft,used to have a bigger one,but a guy really wanted it for the (gasp) mancave.

    That's not a Crescent wrench, that's a vise with a handle on it!
    Statistics show that criminals commit fewer crimes after they have been shot

  11. #31
    Boolit Master
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    That's what we had,,the 3 footer model.
    What ever the size,,it still isn't the right tool for the job of removing fragile gun frames from their bbls nor putting them back together.
    Yes you can get away with it. The place I work at did it for a long time. The number that they did damage or marked up they really didn't seem to care about as they were being refinished anyway.
    It was faster to use,,no putting on the frame wrench with it's separate bolts and then taking it back off again.
    It was all about time spent,, how come it's taking that long..

    For a parallel flat sided frame, there isn't anything easier to make up than a frame wrench from two pieces of 1" sq stock and a couple bolts.
    It clamps tightly and evenly to the sides of the frame with a shim of paper or leather betw and can't slip or run off like has happened in the OP.
    A cresent wrench clamps down no tighter than the jaws can be tighten with the thumb screw.
    That leaves them loose as soon as you start to pull on the handle.
    The damage shown is nothing more than what you see on the flats of a large bolt head or nut as the wrench flats twist and round off as it isn't tight.

    Cresent wrenches on flat recv's and wooden hammer handles through the cylinder window on revolver frames to remove bbls,,,two handy dandy methods that can work,,but can also really screw up your firearm,,, or that of your customer.

    Then you have to go explain your reasoning for using the cresent wrench on the rifle to the OP's son.

  12. #32
    Boolit Master PaulG67's Avatar
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    "He said he hadn't seen it until we mentioned it"

    BS, ain't no way he did not see that. At the very least he should not charge you a dime for the work, or rather butchery he did. At best he should get you another rifle at "$0".
    Paul G


    I am Retired, I was tired yesterday and I am tired today!!!

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulG67 View Post
    "He said he hadn't seen it until we mentioned it"

    BS, ain't no way he did not see that. At the very least he should not charge you a dime for the work, or rather butchery he did. At best he should get you another rifle at "$0".
    ^^^My thoughts. It makes it a bit more awkward because it's someone with whom I really don't want to burn bridges, if you know what I mean. It's a tough call.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check