Titan ReloadingMidSouth Shooters SupplyStainLess Steel MediaLee Precision
RotoMetals2Graf & SonsADvertise hereInline Fabrication

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 52 of 52

Thread: New S&W 57-6 is JUNK

  1. #41
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    568
    I got my Henry in 327 federal, best $700 I ever spent. They are probably the best brand of firearm out there currently as far as value and they really listen to their customers. That was another reason I went with 41 mag, Henry 41 mag is a 1:18 twist, while the 44 mag is a slow 1:38. I have no idea why I'd need it, but knowing myself I'd always want the heavier bullets.

    Henry is a good example of why I say my 57 is junk. Ignoring the major problem, for $900 the rest of the gun is just... meh. It's no classic like my dads 57-2, now that is a real gem. I've made worse purchases through, and if the gun comes back shooting good I'm sure I'll forget about it.
    Last edited by megasupermagnum; 07-11-2018 at 01:05 AM.

  2. #42
    Boolit Master mattw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    East Central Illinois
    Posts
    385
    I own a bunch of Smiths, but I do not own any made after the Bill Clinton era. My late shooting bud had real issues with a couple of late model 38's and 357's that he decided he really needed... both went back and only one came back the other was replaced. It was a bad deal for him.

  3. #43
    Moderator



    JonB_in_Glencoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Land of 10,000 Lakes
    Posts
    10,430
    Yeah, a levergun in a large bore pistol caliber just screams "please shoot heavy cast boolits"

    I like my Henry (after they fixed it) just as much as my Marlin...but my Marlin is probably worth three times what I paid for the Henry.

  4. #44
    Boolit Master maglvr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    301
    "New S&W 57-6 is JUNK"
    No surprises there, they have been junk for many years now. They too will put the key in the door before long, and good riddance to them and their garbage!
    The .357 Magnum......
    1935
    Major Douglas Wesson, using factory loads, which were a 158 gr. soft lead bullet, traveling 1515 fps, from an 8 3/4" barreled S&W, producing 812 ft. lbs of muzzle energy.
    Antelope - 200 yards (2 shots)
    Elk - 130 yards (1 shot)
    Moose - 100 yards (1 shot)
    Grizzly Bear - 135 yards (1 shot).

    It kind of makes one wonder, why today, it will bounce off anything bigger than a rabbit

  5. #45
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Midland, Texas
    Posts
    346
    I hope you have better service than I had with a 625-8 that shot patterns. They replaced the cylinder and it shot worse when I got it back than when I sent it. I refused to send it back again so I spent a day carefully hand honing out two very tight cylinders, polishing the crown and forcing cone. I got it shooting pretty decent but still not like some I've seen. It's acceptable now for my needs but I suspect it is also my last late model S&W revolver (semi-autos seem to fare better). And yes, I have about 30 pre lock S&Ws revolvers.

    Since somewhere in the mid 50's I think S&W has always had issues getting cylinder bores done right. There have been a lot of gunsmiths that have made their livings fixing them. Best example would be the revolvers of the model 24/25 series.. There are just a lot of their guns over the years that were made with cylinder throats that were simply too big. As a caster I've spent a lot of time finding over sized moulds and dies to make bullets big enough to work in them. All of mine shoot pretty good now but a lot of them with over sized cylinders have been passed on to others to tinker with. No, it's not a new problem at S&W but with the improvement in machinery, the problem sure hasn't gotten any better as one might expect.

    Best thing to do would be to show up with a box of pin gauges when you plan to buy a new revolver and try to find a good one (at least a uniform one). Also dental mirror and a set of strong reading glasses or magnifying lens of some sort to inspect the crown and forcing cone. Don't forget a good bore light to check the rifling. Basically you need to be your own inspector.

  6. #46
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    568
    Quote Originally Posted by arlon View Post
    I hope you have better service than I had with a 625-8 that shot patterns. They replaced the cylinder and it shot worse when I got it back than when I sent it. I refused to send it back again so I spent a day carefully hand honing out two very tight cylinders, polishing the crown and forcing cone. I got it shooting pretty decent but still not like some I've seen. It's acceptable now for my needs but I suspect it is also my last late model S&W revolver (semi-autos seem to fare better). And yes, I have about 30 pre lock S&Ws revolvers.

    Since somewhere in the mid 50's I think S&W has always had issues getting cylinder bores done right. There have been a lot of gunsmiths that have made their livings fixing them. Best example would be the revolvers of the model 24/25 series.. There are just a lot of their guns over the years that were made with cylinder throats that were simply too big. As a caster I've spent a lot of time finding over sized moulds and dies to make bullets big enough to work in them. All of mine shoot pretty good now but a lot of them with over sized cylinders have been passed on to others to tinker with. No, it's not a new problem at S&W but with the improvement in machinery, the problem sure hasn't gotten any better as one might expect.

    Best thing to do would be to show up with a box of pin gauges when you plan to buy a new revolver and try to find a good one (at least a uniform one). Also dental mirror and a set of strong reading glasses or magnifying lens of some sort to inspect the crown and forcing cone. Don't forget a good bore light to check the rifling. Basically you need to be your own inspector.
    Well that's not good. I won't pretend to know exactly the problem with mine, but it does seem to be a barrel problem beyond just a simple thread choke. If I got a very tight patch in the bore, I could feel a waviness if that makes any sense, and where the barrel threads into the frame, instead of feeling normal, or a resistance, it felt like a hollow spot. Hopefully S&W comes to the same conclusion. You could not see any of this with a flashlight, so unless you had run a tight patch down the bore in the shop, you would never know until you shoot some paper. I sent mine off over a week ago and have yet to hear back. Fingers cross, but I pretty much wrote it off, maybe I'll see it before fall, but if not, I've got other handguns to use for deer hunting.

  7. #47
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Midland, Texas
    Posts
    346
    I have heard of S&Ws that have "tight" bores where they are threaded into the frame. Cylinder issues seem way more common than barrel problems though. I've never had a barrel issue from a factory defect, only rough crowns and forcing cones. Several of those over the years.

    The new EDM bores worry me a little since I only shoot cast. I have not heard anything positive about EDM rifling and cast bullets (especially in magnums).

    Hopefully they will get this one right.
    Last edited by arlon; 07-20-2018 at 09:18 PM.

  8. #48
    Black Powder 100%


    cajun shooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Livingston, La. 20 miles east of Baton Rouge, La.
    Posts
    4,433
    Well, I hate to hear your story as the 41 mag has been a favorite of mine since it's inception. My first was the Ruger 41 which I purchased at a local gun show. None of my friends had even heard of the 41 mag at the time. My own cast 210 SWC backed with 8 grs. of Unique would hit anything it was pointed at.
    I read where you keep putting down on the S&W N-frame grip, That grip was designed by someone who knew nothing about the human anatomy. Look at your hand on the grip and tell me what it looks like, let's see at the top, the thumb reaches all the way around and overlaps and at the bottom, the pinky finger only makes it about halfway around. Competition shooters have laughed at these grips since S&W installed them. They are a waste of good wood and time making them. They are for presentation only, or a starter for the fireplace.
    Competition shooters have thrown this grip away for years.
    I would check my cylinder with a pin gauge, alignment with a range rod, cylinder gap, end-shake. Find another bbl, have it installed. Find a good shooting grip that you feel comfortable with, load some of the loads that I posted and go to the range. If your 57 still shoots buckshot looking targets, come down here to Louisiana and visit Marie Laveau at her grave site, so that she may remove the curse that has been put on you. Later David
    Shooter of the "HOLY BLACK" SASS 81802 AKA FAIRSHAKE; NRA ; BOLD; WARTHOG;Deadwood Marshal;Bayou Bounty Hunter; So That his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat; 44 WCF filled to the top, 210 gr. bullet

  9. #49
    Boolit Master Drm50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    SE Ohio
    Posts
    766
    I just bought a 57 no dash P&R. Didn't really want it because it's nickel & 83/8". I bought with
    Pachmeyers which have already been replaced with S&W targets. I guess I have the price of a
    new one in it but it's 95%+ condition. If I sell it I won't be taking a loss. It is worth more to me
    as trading stock to get 6"-61/2" Blue N P&Rs. The going rate for high condition guns is $1K around
    here. I don't do Nickel, Stainless, fixed sights or 4" or less barrels and have no interest at all in
    the new production. For shooting and workman ship there is S&Ws made after P&Rs that are still
    fine revolvers. I have a certain dash that is a cut off for my interest but it's not the same on all
    models. You have to educate yourself on S&W to make intelligent purchase. Irritating to me is
    the pricing of S&Ws with not much relation to condition. N frames P&R seem to be $900 from the
    get go. Another PIA is guys raping the Grips to sell separately. 9 out of 10 S&Ws I buy have
    aftermarket grips. I deal in older S&Ws and even if it is nice gun, I'm not paying top price for it
    with rubber grips. The Grip Mongers want $100 and up for S&W Target grips. I get most of mine
    on line for about half that. Some don't like to buy a used gun. In handguns especially there are
    the bulk of them that haven't seen 500rds through them and have never been carried. The ones
    that have had much use are not hard to spot even with good finish. Look at recoil shield and the
    forcing cone for signs of use, besides normal check on running gears. You can't go wrong with a
    good P&R S&W. Actually for shooting purposes the S&Ws made post WW2 up until the key hole
    models ( speaking in general ) were best guns S&W produced.

  10. #50
    Boolit Master

    jonp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Planet Reality
    Posts
    5,147
    It seems like you have to spend $2000 just to have a working handgun anymore.

    Ruger says otherwise


    I really tried to like the blackhawk, but just couldn't get over the single action grip. At the risk of sounding like a wuss, 41 mag is about all I can shoot well, and I do not feel like I have any control over a single action grip with 41 magnum.


    Try a Bisley
    Last edited by jonp; Yesterday at 05:19 PM.
    Government is the great fiction, through which everybody endeavors to live at the expense of everybody else.
    Bastiat

    Sic transit gloria mundi ( the glory of man is fleeting)
    Whispered in Julius Caesars ear before every speech to remind him that everything comes to an end.

    Non nobis Domine,
    non nobis,
    sed nomini tuo da gloriam

    (Not unto us, O Lord, not unto us,
    but to thy name give the glory.)
    Knights Templar

  11. #51
    Boolit Master

    jonp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Planet Reality
    Posts
    5,147
    In SW's I restrict myself to used, older guns always blued as stainless or nickel doesn't interest me and in good condition. Nothing they make today can surpass them in either quality of build, blueing or accuracy.
    For working handguns I buy Ruger's usually Blackhawks. Not the most refined but tough as nails and accurate enough for hunting and self defense.
    Government is the great fiction, through which everybody endeavors to live at the expense of everybody else.
    Bastiat

    Sic transit gloria mundi ( the glory of man is fleeting)
    Whispered in Julius Caesars ear before every speech to remind him that everything comes to an end.

    Non nobis Domine,
    non nobis,
    sed nomini tuo da gloriam

    (Not unto us, O Lord, not unto us,
    but to thy name give the glory.)
    Knights Templar

  12. #52
    Boolit Master Drm50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    SE Ohio
    Posts
    766
    There is no finer SA revolver than a 3 screw Ruger Blackhawk. Like S&Ws the quality has suffered.
    I hear as many complaints on Rugers as S&W, they may have better Customer Service. I pay
    no interest to Ruger new models. If it has warning on barrel its to new for me, revolver or auto.
    If you can shoot a single action well you will have no trouble with a DA, not visa versa.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check