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Thread: Neck sizing -vs- Full Length sizing

  1. #21
    Boolit Buddy Hick's Avatar
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    Could the growth be related to how hot you load? I have brass that has been reloaded 20 times and slips easily into the chamber every time-- and it has never been full-length sized. Even with a micrometer I can't find any evidence that it is growing bigger each time. Maybe I don't load hot enough for it to matter?
    Hick: Iron sights!

  2. #22
    Boolit Master


    Larry Gibson's Avatar
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    Could the growth be related to how hot you load?

    Absolutely
    Larry Gibson

    “Deficient observation is merely a form of ignorance and responsible for the many morbid notions and foolish ideas prevailing.”
    ― Nikola Tesla

  3. #23
    Boolit Master

    Rcmaveric's Avatar
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    I am horrible at neck sizing. All i have is Lee is dies so that says a thing or two. When i try to neck size it doesn't work in bolt or lever action.
    "Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far."
    ~Theodore Roosevelt~

  4. #24
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rcmaveric View Post
    I am horrible at neck sizing. All i have is Lee is dies so that says a thing or two. When i try to neck size it doesn't work in bolt or lever action.
    Must be done for ONLY the rifle it is used in and no other. Semi-autos do not live well with neck sizing only because of chambering issues, not extracton. I neck size for my single shots and for bolts only and only for that gun.

  5. #25
    Boolit Buddy Walks's Avatar
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    I grew up full-length sizing .30-06 that went interchangeably into Garands, M1917 & both M1903 & A3's. G.I. brass only. Never had a case separate or a case split.

    Partial sizing for bolt guns when only one gun of that Caliber. Even used a Lyman 310 tool dies to reload .300Sav in Savage 99.

    When I bought my Mini-14 in 1976 & Colt AR-15 a year later I only loaded G.I. brass interchangeably for both using std RCBS FL dies. Never a problem.
    I use Lyman 310 NS dies for my bolt rifles, or partial size with a FL sizer.
    Use what works for you, but I think it's best to separate brass per gun.
    I think the only guns that need small base are Hunting Rifles that have SAAMI specs. Remington & Browning Semi-auto's & Savage& Remington Pumps.

    Neck-Sizing is a viable alternative for bolt guns & does prolong case life. As far as accuracy goes...can't see a difference.

    I think the trend toward small- base speciality die sets are a waste of money & just the Reloading Companies way to get more money out of us. It also wears out our brass faster, so also benefits ammo & brass manufacturer's.
    Happiness is a Warm GUN & more ammo to shoot in it.

  6. #26
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by fast ronnie View Post
    Must be done for ONLY the rifle it is used in and no other. Semi-autos do not live well with neck sizing only because of chambering issues, not extracton. I neck size for my single shots and for bolts only and only for that gun.
    I know and i do. I still suck at it. Bullets fall through the case necks or the case hard to chamber. Frustrates me to no end on my level of fail. So i just full resize and everything works just fine. I atain acceptable accuracy and reliable function with this way.

    Sent from my SM-G925T using Tapatalk
    "Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far."
    ~Theodore Roosevelt~

  7. #27
    Boolit Master tazman's Avatar
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    I use the Lee neck sizer on the 30-06 brass for my bench rest rifle. I haven't had any of the issues you seem to have.
    Accuracy is slightly better with the neck sizing but I am not certain it wouldn't be just as good with full length sizing now that I have the OAL just right for the rifle.
    It took some experimenting to find what it likes.

  8. #28
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rcmaveric View Post
    I know and i do. I still suck at it. Bullets fall through the case necks or the case hard to chamber. Frustrates me to no end on my level of fail. So i just full resize and everything works just fine. I atain acceptable accuracy and reliable function with this way.

    Sent from my SM-G925T using Tapatalk
    cases need to be all the same for neck sizing only with bushing dies but not with the Lee collet type dies. If the cases are hardened, there are two ways it can be fixed; first is to anneal the case before neck sizing. The second is dependent on what die you are using. If it a Lee collet die, Lee makes an undersize arbor and that is what controls the inside finished dimension. That is the size that you want to pay attention to. It should be about .002 under the size of the bullet. Some like to have it at just .001 under the size of the bullet. If your bullet is falling into the case, the neck isn't being sized enough. Any more than .002 is a waste of time and is somewhat hard on the brass. If you are using a jacketed bullet, the case will be pushed back out until you still have only about .002 press fit. The brass is not strong enough to resize the bullet smaller.
    If you are shooting a lead bullet, things change a little bit. If the brass is sized too small, the brass will squish the lead down until it fits in the brass.
    The problem then becomes the bullet is now undersized which will cause leading of the barrel, also can cause an accuracy problem.
    If all the brass is the same, a neck size bushing die is the way to go with a bolt action. That brass is then shot out of that rifle only.Shooting cast bullets is a whole "nother game. Some do not size their brass at all when using cast in a bolt action. There is much information about this on the forum, so I won't even go there.
    If the cartridge is hard to chamber, there are a few different causes. First, neck may be too large to chamber. This would be a dangerous situation where the brass does not have enough room to expand and allow the release of the bullet. Second thing that can go wrong and make chambering difficult is the case may be too long for the chamber by using brass that has been fired in a different gun. Neck sizing only works in ONE gun. Third thing that can cause chambering issues is loading too hot. If this is the case, you will have trouble opening the bolt for extraction as the case has been stretched too far. If a round chambers easily but you have hard opening, back off on the load as it is too hot.
    Not picking on anyone here, just trying to help if possible. You have found one solution by resizing everything. Only brass life will be a little shorter, maybe not quite as accurate, but is a very acceptable way to insure being able to chamber a round for that possible secondary shot at a trophy buck.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check