StainLess Steel MediaInline FabricationRotoMetals2MidSouth Shooters Supply
ADvertise hereLee PrecisionTitan ReloadingGraf & Sons

Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Spring shoot at Friendship

  1. #1
    Boolit Master

    tranders's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    218

    Spring shoot at Friendship

    I am heading out in the morning for the Spring shoot at Friendship. Meeting my brother down there for the primitive shoot and Woods Walk.

    Anyone else going?

  2. #2
    Boolit Master kens's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    coastal Ga
    Posts
    887
    Oh how I wish I could.
    Keep us posted on the turnout and events.

  3. #3
    Boolit Master




    Boz330's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    3,686
    Just got back from the Long Range event held at Camp Atterbuy, 800, 900, and 1000yd. Unfortunately this event is slowly going under from lack of participation. This one had the minimum participants to break even. I'm not sure why the attendance is down so far since 10 years ago there were plenty of people participating in both ML Class and Cartridge Class.
    Bob
    GUNFIRE! The sound of Freedom!

  4. #4
    Boolit Master

    rfd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    NJ via TX
    Posts
    2,237
    nope, no friendship this year for me. in fact, no more NMLRA for me. to each their own.

  5. #5
    Boolit Master

    tranders's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    218

    Spring shoot at Friendship

    Had a great time this weekend. Seemed like a good turn out despite very hot weather.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by tranders; 06-10-2018 at 11:41 PM.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master waarp8nt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    F-N-Ham, IL
    Posts
    411
    Nice shooting!

    We (wife and I) did not go this year. Too many things required our attention at home.
    Boolits Feedback <> Gunbroker Feedback

    Just remember son, many times free advise is worth what you pay for it. ~ My Dad

    Bluegrass...the speed metal of country music!

  7. #7
    Boolit Master



    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Southwestern Ohio
    Posts
    8,147
    The Green Frog and I made the trip down on Friday. Met up with some old friends, toured past Commercial Row, talked to a number of dealer/friends, found the heat REALLY stifling (just flat getting too old for this (:>()) but all in all, really enjoyed it... Finally, had to leave in the early afternoon before they carried me out...

    I have a LOT of memories of that range and many, many matches!

    Dale53

  8. #8
    Not there, but I sure have fond memories of my visits there in years past.

  9. #9
    Boolit Master




    Boz330's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    3,686
    The real Heydays were in the 70s and 80s. There were no vacancies in commercial row and it was hard to find a parking place. I guess the upside now is you don't have to pay to get in but there doesn't seem to be much happening either. Of course the average age of members of NMLRA is 70 so there is no new blood coming in. Unfortunately this is happening to many forms of recreation, the younger generations would rather play on a computer than actually go out and do something.

    Bob
    GUNFIRE! The sound of Freedom!

  10. #10
    Boolit Master



    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Southwestern Ohio
    Posts
    8,147
    Boz;
    My understanding is the organization is working hard to turn the organization around. It has been reported that membership is again increasing and that the new members are significantly younger.

    I, for one, am glad to hear this, BIG TIME!

    FWIW,
    Dale53

  11. #11
    Boolit Master

    rfd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    NJ via TX
    Posts
    2,237
    yes, there is a reason for new somewhat younger members joining the NMLRA, but it ain't about trad muzzleloaders.

  12. #12
    Boolit Master




    Boz330's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    3,686
    The average age of NMLRA members is 70 years, I'm 72. If the organization doesn't turn around it WILL be dead in 10 years or so and they will be dividing the assets.
    Short of going to the national black rifle association. I'm not sure if it has a chance! To a certain extent they are allowing BPCR silhouette shooters to use the range and the couple times I've attended they have had what I would call good turn outs. Haven't been in a couple years so not sure that is still the case. The matches that I attend in Cincinnati's Miami Rifle and Pistol Club are almost dead, the BOD is wanting to get rid of the BPCR matches in favor of something that will make money. This year they have cancelled 2 of our matches in favor of other venues and moved the July match to another weekend to do the same.
    Our match director is a BOD and if not for him I think it would already have been cancelled.
    When I joined the club 8 or 10 years ago it had 1000 members and you could get right in. Now it has 3000+ members and a 3 year waiting list. But they are mostly plinkers that want to come out and blaze away with there deer guns or burn through a couple bricks of 22. To be honest I think that Obama was mostly responsible for the influx.
    On another note I believe that the 2nd Amendment is just 1 generation away from extinction with today's education system, news reporting, and attitudes. I never would have thought that I would say that but the handwriting seems to be on the wall. When I was a kid in the 50s you could get all of the guns you wanted through the US Mail, Cheap. Now you are basically guilty until proven innocent to buy one and they are expensive as hell.

    Bob
    GUNFIRE! The sound of Freedom!

  13. #13
    Boolit Master

    rfd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    NJ via TX
    Posts
    2,237
    Quote Originally Posted by Boz330 View Post
    .... On another note I believe that the 2nd Amendment is just 1 generation away from extinction with today's education system, news reporting, and attitudes. I never would have thought that I would say that but the handwriting seems to be on the wall. When I was a kid in the 50s you could get all of the guns you wanted through the US Mail, Cheap. Now you are basically guilty until proven innocent to buy one and they are expensive as hell.

    Bob
    we're getting way off the OP's topic, and i do apologize if that matters to anyone. boz330 brings up an important core topic for us shootists. as another 72 years young USA citizen shooter, i totally agree with him. gone are the dayze where firearms were well respected by all, could easily be purchased, were never considered the culprit of criminal activities (amazingly, we considered the bad buys the criminals), and i used to take my .22 long gun to school on the bus, as a rifle team member. Yes, preaching to my brethren cast boolits brothers 'n' sisters, but good words to be heard none the less ...

    Past Versus Present Americans

    by Professor of Economics, Walter E. Williams
    Bradley Prize Winner 2017
    George Mason University

    Having enjoyed my 82nd birthday, I am part of a group of about 50 million Americans who are 65 years of age or older. Those who are 90 or older were in school during the 1930s. My age cohort was in school during the 1940s. Baby boomers approaching their 70s were in school during the 1950s and early ’60s.

    Try this question to any one of those 50 million Americans who are 65 or older: Do you recall any discussions about the need to hire armed guards to protect students and teachers against school shootings? Do you remember school policemen patrolling the hallways? How many students were shot to death during the time you were in school? For me and those other Americans 65 or older, when we were in school, a conversation about hiring armed guards and having police patrol hallways would have been seen as lunacy. There was no reason. What’s the difference between yesteryear and today? The logic of the argument for those calling for stricter gun control laws, in the wake of recent school shootings, is that something has happened to guns. Guns have behaved more poorly and become evil. Guns themselves are the problem.

    The job for those of us who are 65 or older is to relay the fact that guns were more available and less controlled in years past, when there was far less mayhem. Something else is the problem. Guns haven’t changed. People have changed. Behavior that is accepted from today’s young people was not accepted yesteryear. For those of us who are 65 or older, assaults on teachers were not routine as they are in some cities. For example, in Baltimore, an average of four teachers and staff members were assaulted each school day in 2010, and more than 300 school staff members filed workers’ compensation claims in a year because of injuries received through assaults or altercations on the job. In Philadelphia, 690 teachers were assaulted in 2010, and in a five-year period, 4,000 were. In that city’s schools, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer, “on an average day 25 students, teachers, or other staff members were beaten, robbed, sexually assaulted, or victims of other violent crimes. That doesn’t even include thousands more who are extorted, threatened, or bullied in a school year.” Yale University legal scholar John Lott argues that gun accessibility in our country has never been as restricted as it is now.

    Lott reports that until the 1960s, New York City public high schools had shooting clubs. Students carried their rifles to school on the subway in the morning and then turned them over to their homeroom teacher or a gym teacher — and that was mainly to keep them centrally stored and out of the way. Rifles were retrieved after school for target practice (http://tinyurl.com/yapuaehp). Virginia’s rural areas had a long tradition of high school students going hunting in the morning before school, and they sometimes stored their guns in the trunks of their cars during the school day, parked on the school grounds. During earlier periods, people could simply walk into a hardware store and buy a rifle. Buying a rifle or pistol through a mail-order catalog — such as Sears, Roebuck & Co.’s — was easy. Often, a 12th or 14th birthday present was a shiny new .22-caliber rifle, given to a boy by his father.

    These facts of our history should confront us with a question: With greater accessibility to guns in the past, why wasn’t there the kind of violence we see today, when there is much more restricted access to guns? There’s another aspect of our response to mayhem. When a murderer uses a bomb, truck or car to kill people, we don’t blame the bomb, truck or car. We don’t call for control over the instrument of death. We seem to fully recognize that such objects are inanimate and incapable of acting on their own. We blame the perpetrator. However, when the murder is done using a gun, we do call for control over the inanimate instrument of death — the gun. I smell a hidden anti-gun agenda.

  14. #14
    Boolit Master




    Boz330's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    3,686
    I really like Walter Williams and stole that article. The guy is common sense personified.

    Bob
    GUNFIRE! The sound of Freedom!

  15. #15
    Boolit Master

    tranders's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    218
    That is a great article.

    I saw some younger folks and quite a few ladies shooting this year in a lot of different classes. Even saw a few shooting trap and sporting clays.

    I see no problem allowing the modern equipment if the organization is going to survive.
    The folks shooting a modern inline with a scope are not competing against the folks shooting traditional equipment.

    I personally like seeing the diversity when I walk down the 1/4 mile long shooting line.
    Last edited by tranders; 06-13-2018 at 11:22 AM.

  16. #16
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    393
    Probably not going to make it this spring, doggone. It's been a while since I competed there - I use the term "compete" loosely since I don't think I ever made any of the record holders nervous. I sure worked at it, though. I did pretty well at the grocery, pork and egg shoots at the local clubs. It got to the point I was money ahead to shoot for groceries as I almost usually came home with more than my entry fee cost me, and if not it was way more fun than wandering the aisles at Kroger. But on the Walter Cline offhand line I barely placed. Even without shooting, I still register and pay the entry fee, just to give my support to the whole endeavor.

    I remember the Heydays of the '70 and '80s that Boz mentions. I remember the impossible traffic a mile out from there as I heard the shooting and conspired to find another way in if I had to hike! These days I come in on Friendship Road from US 50, which back then seemed to be almost ignored. I recall that every LGS had a flyer for Friendship hanging somewhere and it was announced on the radio and TV. Not sure what happened, but there's little evidence I can see that it's happening and not a peep in various media. Who's handling the PR I wonder. Gotta get this thing back on the map and into people's awareness. Once upon a time, there were live broadcasts of the shoots on WLW AM 700.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check