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Thread: Bought my first micrometer

  1. #1
    Boolit Master am44mag's Avatar
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    Bought my first micrometer

    Finally did something I've been meaning to do for a while and bought a micrometer. It looks to be pretty old, and I am definitely going to be reading that instruction booklet that came with it. I think I did pretty good for $32 on fleabay. Should be here Saturday.

    I'm kind of amazed that the original owner kept EVERYTHING. From what I could find online, I believe that box design is from the 1920s-1930s.

    ______________________________________________
    Aaron

  2. #2
    Boolit Master

    dale2242's Avatar
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    I have that very Micrometer .
    Starrett are high quality...dale

  3. #3
    Boolit Master
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    I have mine I bought in 68. still in the box with the with all the papers. same for the last word indicator bought at the same time.

  4. #4
    Boolit Master

    DougGuy's Avatar
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    It's better than calipers, but very difficult to read in tenths of a thousandth. I would suggest a Mitutoyo Digimatic that would run you $3 to $12 more..
    Got a .22 .30 .32 .357 .38 .40 .41 .44 .45 .480 or .500 S&W cylinder that needs throat reaming? 9mm, 10mm/40S&W, 45 ACP pistol barrel that won't "plunk" your handloads? Shoot me a PM! Also on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Cylinderhone-756429174391912/

  5. #5
    Boolit Master

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    Thats a nice find. Now you just need to practice with it until you get comfortable with it.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master RED BEAR's Avatar
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    you can't go wrong with starret. get a standard or a steel dowel of known size to practice on and get the feel. i found that developing a feel is more important than the make of mic (no junck ones) . i personally always liked the feel of brown and sharpe but thats just me.

  7. #7
    Boolit Master
    CastingFool's Avatar
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    I also have that same micrometer, except mine has a ratchet on the barrel, to keep heavy handed "machinists" from using mikes as clamps. My dad bought it used, and used for a number of years as a machinist. In 1974, it became mine, when I started working as a machinist. Today, you will usually find it on my "reloading" bench, very close to my 6" dial caliper.

  8. #8
    Boolit Master

    Beagle333's Avatar
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    I have two of that same model. Great mics.
    KE4GWE - - - - - - Colt 1860, it just feels right.

  9. #9
    Boolit Master murf205's Avatar
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    I have one just like it that belonged to my father in law who was an inspector at USS at the
    Fairfield Works and a newer one with the ratchet. You cant be without one. You will get the "feel" for it quickly.
    IT AINT what ya shoot--its how ya shoot it

  10. #10
    Boolit Master





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    Great find and purchase you are going to be happy!!!! Mic's are so much better than just calipers

  11. #11
    Boolit Master
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    All through my engineering and machining apprenticeship I used a Starrett 0 to 1" mike made in the 1930s. I have at least a half dozen 0 to 1" or 1.2" mikes now. I particularly like my B & S "slant line", my Tesa "Digit-Mike(s)" and my Mitutoyo "Quickmike(s)".

    Another brand that was considered quite good back in the first half of the 20th century was Lufkin.

    am44mag, as long as your mike zeros at 0", 1 inch and at say, .500", you did fine.
    A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the People to keep and bear arms *shall not be infringed*.

    "The greatest danger to American freedom is a government that ignores the Constitution."
    - Thomas Jefferson

    "While the people have property, arms in their hands, and only a spark of noble spirit, the most corrupt Congress must be mad to form any project of tyranny."
    - Rev. Nicholas Collin, Fayetteville Gazette (N.C.), October 12, 1789

  12. #12
    Boolit Master am44mag's Avatar
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    It seems to work perfectly. You can tell it's been used a LOT, but it's smooth and was very well taken care of. I might have to get a magnifying glass though. My eye's aren't that great and those lines are hard to see.

    Did my first pound cast (why I was wanting to buy it in the first place). I just grabbed an old Turkish Mauser to try it with. If I did everything right, and read the mic right, then it has a throat of 0.3259 and a bore of 0.3232 (ten thousandths place is an estimation, more on that in a sec). For an old gun like this that has been well used, I'd say that sounds about right (Especially with the HOT ammo those crazy Turks used). The rifling near the throat was kind of faint and you couldn't really tell where it started. It also seems like the throat was relatively short.

    I'm kind of failing to see how I'm supposed to read ten thousandths. The instructions talk about a vernier scale, but there isn't one that I can find. It has a bunch of numbers on it though that I'm not sure what they are used for. They're between the two knurled parts (pic below).

    ______________________________________________
    Aaron

  13. #13
    Boolit Master
    smokeywolf's Avatar
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    Your mike doesn't have a "tenth" scale on it. You just have to look at your thimble position and take your best guess.
    A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the People to keep and bear arms *shall not be infringed*.

    "The greatest danger to American freedom is a government that ignores the Constitution."
    - Thomas Jefferson

    "While the people have property, arms in their hands, and only a spark of noble spirit, the most corrupt Congress must be mad to form any project of tyranny."
    - Rev. Nicholas Collin, Fayetteville Gazette (N.C.), October 12, 1789

  14. #14
    Boolit Master am44mag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smokeywolf View Post
    Your mike doesn't have a "tenth" scale on it. You just have to look at your thimble position and take your best guess.
    That's what I figured.
    ______________________________________________
    Aaron

  15. #15
    Boolit Master



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    I have never wore one out there a adjustments from accuracy to thread slop that can be made.
    Are my kids/grandkids more important than "o"'s kids, to me they are,darn tooting they are!!! They deserve the same armed protection afforded "o"'s kids.
    I have been hoodwinked but not by"o"
    In God we trust,in "o" never trust
    Support those that support the Constitution and the 2nd Amendant

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DougGuy View Post
    It's better than calipers, but very difficult to read in tenths of a thousandth. I would suggest a Mitutoyo Digimatic that would run you $3 to $12 more..
    It is better than calipers for diameters of bullets, case heads etc., but the reloader doesn't need its level of accuracy for case or cartridge lengths. That one probably measures only in thousandths. The .0001 versions have lengthwise lines above the 0 to 9 numbers on the non-rotating sleeve, forming a vernier scale to measure tenths of the thousandths on the rotating thimble.

    If they had digital micrometers in the 20s or 30s, I wonder how many it would have outlived?

    I've got mine - a 2 to 3in. Starret, mint and in a wooden case, with the name LS Starret Co. Ltd., Jedburgh, Scotland. They opened there in 1958, and are still there. I don't know how much if any they actually make in the UK, but they once did. As far as you can tell, their Brazilian and Chinese operations seem to be factories genuinely established by themselves.

    Probably the reason for mine being mint, is that it has been as much of a white elephant in someone else's workshop as it has been in mine. Also that I bought it for 2.50 on eBay, while the 1in. equivalent, the only one currently on their website, is 135.26 plus 20% tax. Oh well, the second-highest bidder, and there was one, did that.

    I have other micrometers by the British Moore and Wright firm, including a point micrometer. I was able to identify the threads on a Francotte Martini action with that one, as 15/16in. rather than 23mm., by measuring from the roots of the female thread to the outside of the receiver. Also I once visited a small engineer's suppliers near the quayside in Glasgow, where engineering was invented, and in a tray of supposedly bargain priced dead stock found a mint tubing micrometer than has lain in stock for a decade or two. The bargain price turned out to be "Just take it and welcome", and although I have been a long-term customer, I was never a large or frequent one.

  17. #17
    Boolit Master MOA's Avatar
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    Nice find am44mag. All my digital micrometers an calipers are Starrett. My first one I got from my grandmother which was a 0-1 inch for my job at Bendix. I worked the 2nd shift at a tap and drill plant in New England as a OD grinder. I'm sort of prejudice about Starrett though, both my parents grew up in Athol, Ma, both worked at Starrett early on after high school until the war. My grandfather was a department head when he retired in 1965 with 45 years at the plant. Yup, can't go too wrong with Starrett tools.Click image for larger version. 

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  18. #18
    Boolit Master
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    AM 44 mag comments "It has a bunch of numbers on it though that I'm not sure what they are used for. They're between the two knurled parts (pic below)."

    If your barrel is marked like mine, they are fraction to decimal conversions.

  19. #19
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    JonB_in_Glencoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smokeywolf View Post
    All through my engineering and machining apprenticeship I used a Starrett 0 to 1" mike made in the 1930s. I have at least a half dozen 0 to 1" or 1.2" mikes now. I particularly like my B & S "slant line", my Tesa "Digit-Mike(s)" and my Mitutoyo "Quickmike(s)".

    Another brand that was considered quite good back in the first half of the 20th century was Lufkin.

    am44mag, as long as your mike zeros at 0", 1 inch and at say, .500", you did fine.
    I would also like to add...

    Am44mag,
    If you don't have any standards or a standard.
    https://www.qualitymag.com/articles/...ng-micrometers
    Us reloaders can get by, by using jacketed bullets, a .429 bullet will measure .429
    and a .308 bullet will measure .308.
    Jacketed bullets are what I used to 'check' the calibration of the first Mic I bought. Luckily my second Mic came with a neat little donut shaped standard, that was 1.000 in diameter and .250 thick.

  20. #20
    Boolit Master
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    The tenths vernier will be on the back side of the barrel. Not all of Starret's mic's have the tenths graduation on them.
    Does the mic have the carbide faces? A lot of them don't have that either, but if it does, it is a nice bonus. You can tell by looking at the tip of the spindle.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check