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Thread: What is " TRACERLAB " LEAD ??

  1. #1
    Boolit Man
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    Smile What is " TRACERLAB " LEAD ??

    A friend is moving and ask me if I had any use for some "lead "( say what ? ) gave me some blocks that are tounge & groved to fit together ( 75 lbs. ) . Stamped " Tracerlab " my H-5 pencil will not scratch it !!! yup,,, rings when y'a whack it ,, think it came out of a LAB ,,, LINO- MONO- ?? still has some red paint on it . Any guess's of how hard this stuff is ??

    coffee's ready,,, Hootmix .

  2. #2
    Boolit Master
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    I have no idea how hard that would be but it was likely shielding for some type of instrument.

    Tracerlab is a trade name for a company that made radiation detectors and other equipment.

    http://national-radiation-instrument...ew_page_37.htm

    I'm surprised it isn't pure lead but they may have intentionally alloyed it for some structural reasons.

  3. #3
    Boolit Master

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    I worked in the security field in the middle 1960s and Tracerlab was one of our accounts located on Wright Ave. in Richmond, CA. The lead bricks were used to isolate radioactive sources which were used to calibrate detection and monitoring instruments that they produced. I never saw any that was painted red -- it was all grey lead color. Odd to see that pop up after all of these years.

    Right after I posted this reply it struck me that you might want to check for the radiation level of the lead with a Geiger Counter. It may be painted red for a reason. When I worked there several of the employees were shooters and the lead was discussed fairly often. I learned that for the company's purposes the best lead was salvaged from the keels of ships that had sunk early in WW II or prior to the war as it had been the first and easiest to mine, and it's natural radioactive level was extremely low, but the lead mined later had a radiation level that interfered with their instruments.
    Last edited by Der Gebirgsjager; 04-15-2018 at 03:38 PM. Reason: add info

  4. #4
    Boolit Man
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    I was glad to see "IT " ,,, don't think it's pure ,, ring's too much. Have about 70-80 lbs. pure lead none of it rings when " whacked " ( I can whack that bell if I want too--quote from Lonesome Dove ) . Going to melt into 2 1/2 lb. cupcake ingots .

  5. #5
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Der Gebirgsjager View Post
    I worked in the security field in the middle 1960s and Tracerlab was one of our accounts located on Wright Ave. in Richmond, CA. The lead bricks were used to isolate radioactive sources which were used to calibrate detection and monitoring instruments that they produced. I never saw any that was painted red -- it was all grey lead color. Odd to see that pop up after all of these years.

    Right after I posted this reply it struck me that you might want to check for the radiation level of the lead with a Geiger Counter. It may be painted red for a reason. When I worked there several of the employees were shooters and the lead was discussed fairly often. I learned that for the company's purposes the best lead was salvaged from the keels of ships that had sunk early in WW II or prior to the war as it had been the first and easiest to mine, and it's natural radioactive level was extremely low, but the lead mined later had a radiation level that interfered with their instruments.
    I think they were speaking about low background Steel, not lead.
    Low background steel was produced before atmospheric testing of atomic bombs.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low-background_steel

    One of the prime sources of low background steel were ships produced prior to July 1945.

    I've never heard of low background Lead.

  6. #6
    Boolit Man
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    My friend use to work for " our government " as a someone who measured the earth's crust and atmosphere and some other " stuff ",, back in the ( his ) day ,, I'm sure the lead is safe or he wouldn't of had it,, He did mention he could lock these brick's together to do instrument reading's on .

    coffe's ready,,, Hootmix .

  7. #7
    Boolit Master
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    Sunken ship lead over 100 yrs old is bought by micro circuit and computer mfg. To get the minimum ionizing radiation in the circut board. Lead is the final element left from the radioactive decay of uranium.
    QUIS CUSTODIET IPSOS CUSTODES?

  8. #8
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by Petrol & Powder View Post
    I think they were speaking about low background Steel, not lead.
    Low background steel was produced before atmospheric testing of atomic bombs.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low-background_steel

    One of the prime sources of low background steel were ships produced prior to July 1945.

    I've never heard of low background Lead.
    Quote Originally Posted by jdfoxinc View Post
    Sunken ship lead over 100 yrs old is bought by micro circuit and computer mfg. To get the minimum ionizing radiation in the circut board. Lead is the final element left from the radioactive decay of uranium.
    Yes, that was/is my understanding of it. Some is just more decayed than some other and is more radioactive. But, I don't claim to be a scientist.....

  9. #9
    Boolit Master


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    Quote Originally Posted by Der Gebirgsjager View Post
    But, I don't claim to be a scientist.....
    did you stay in a Holiday Inn?

    could qualify you
    NRA Life
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    RVN War Games, 2nd Place

  10. #10
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    Send a sample to BNE for an XRF test...

  11. #11
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Laich View Post
    did you stay in a Holiday Inn?

    could qualify you
    I actually did, for the first time, about one year ago in Albany, OR. But I used that stay to become a neurosurgeon. Great prime rib in the nearby restaurant!

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check