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Thread: Got a lathe, maybe this would do for a small first project?

  1. #1
    Boolit Master
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    Got a lathe, maybe this would do for a small first project?

    I got a SAA revolver that I marred the base pin on many years ago:



    Well I was thinking that since I recently acquired a metal lathe maybe I could take a few light passes and clean up the surface, or maybe just make a whole new part? What kind of steel would be the steel to use here in that case. Mild steel is not suitable I guess.

    Carbon steel is what you want I guess, does it need to be hardened and tempered then?

  2. #2
    Boolit Buddy
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    I don't think you need to harden and temper, If your old one was hardened it would not have marked up so much.

    I would start with a cold finished rod and turn on a custom end, make two or three just for the practice. The foot of rod you buy won't cost as much as a coffee. Just slap on some cold blue, or even black magic marker in a pinch just so the neighbors can't tell you did it yourself.

    You could even make one out of stainless if you wanted.

    That rod is quite small for the length that you will have to turn if you can not start with the right size. If you have to turn down the diameter you will have to center drill the end and use your tailstock to support the end away from the chuck and use small cuts, maybe 5 thousanths at a time and polish with some emery cloth .

  3. #3
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by mulespurs View Post
    I don't think you need to harden and temper, If your old one was hardened it would not have marked up so much.
    Oh yeah! D'oh, can't believe I didn't figure that out on my own. Thanks for your help!

  4. #4
    Make 2 I have one in a 45lc that has burrs I cant get out


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  5. #5
    Boolit Master Jedman's Avatar
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    Buy some drill Rod that is large enough in diameter to make your pin. It is good for most gun parts and can be hardened if needed and is reasonable priced.

    Jedman

  6. #6
    Boolit Master

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    If you have a set of Swiss files, (and an Optivisor, if needed), you can chuck your present pin up and clean up those grooves and take out the marring on the end. A polish with crocus cloth, a little cold blue and nobody will be able to tell the difference.

    Ive also found a lathe handy to deepen the notch in the cylinder pin to keep it from backing out on firing. Happens sometimes in big calibers with those spring-loaded crosspins.

  7. #7
    Boolit Master

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    In reality its probably a leaded steel of the 10l series not super hard but easy machining and polishes finishes easy. If you really want to get fancy case harden it after turning. If you have the lathe then the easiest way to make this min is to buy your stock and turn a 1/2" long false center on each end. set up between centers with a dog to drive it. In this way you can turn it full length in one pass. makes measuring for the grooves easier as its all out of the chuck. When turned and polished remove false centers and radious the outside end.

  8. #8
    Boolit Master



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    BUT in reality the best thing is to purchase a new part
    https://www.uberti-usa.com/1873-catt...atron-revolver

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  9. #9
    Boolit Master

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    I use drill rod too.

  10. #10
    Boolit Master

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    W1 (water hardening) drill rod would be a really good choice and for that would work really well even without hardening. However if it were mine I would simply grab a grade 8 bolt of the proper length and head for that lathe, wouldn't take long at all to whittle out one of those rods and judging from that pic I am willing to bet a grade 8 bolt is better steel and likely harder than the factory part. Grade 8 bolts machine really well and are VERY tough, I save all the old bolts I run into when rebuilding equipment especially the longer ones and use them for lots of jobs similar to this.
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  11. #11
    Boolit Master dkf's Avatar
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    For parts I want some hardness and good toughness I often use 4140 prehard or 1144 which is also prehardened. Both are around 30Rc so they can be machined easily, even with HSS tooling. The 1144 is a free machining steel so you can most often get a better surface finish on it vs the 4140. McMaster has both in short lengths.

  12. #12
    Boolit Master Mauser 98K's Avatar
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    id just use some real fine Emory and spin it to polish it out and then refinish. shouldn't take much to polish those scratches out.

  13. #13
    Boolit Master
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    W1 drill rod is cheap, I got mine from Graingers.

    If you make one from W1, you can polish, harden and then temper pretty easy. If you temer @ 580 F in a oven you get a nice blue color. This is not a bad choice for hardness (it is recommended for things like screwdrivers) and the blue is a bonus.

    Using W1 rod and learning to harden and temper greatly improves the overall usefullness of your metal lathe.

  14. #14
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkf View Post
    For parts I want some hardness and good toughness I often use 4140 prehard or 1144 which is also prehardened. Both are around 30Rc so they can be machined easily, even with HSS tooling. The 1144 is a free machining steel so you can most often get a better surface finish on it vs the 4140. McMaster has both in short lengths.

    Grade 8 bolts are medium carbon steel with a minimum tensile strength of better than 150,000 PSI and a Rc hardness of 30-32, sound familiar?

    I suppose different manufacturers can use different steels for grade 8 fasteners since I don't believe ASME specifies a particular steel, just minimum specs for tensile and shear strengths plus hardness, etc in any case the specs are so close to 4140HT it's scary and grade 8 bolts are as close as the nearest hardware store or even a Lowes or Home Depot.
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  15. #15
    Boolit Master dkf's Avatar
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    Grade 8 hardware can vary quite a bit and machineability often leaves a lot to be desired. I machine them plenty enough in my day job. If I have to machine fasteners or a part from a fastener I would much rather use a SHCS or similar fastener that are usually black oxide coated. They are stronger than grade 8 and a little harder but still below 40Rc, surface finish is usually nicer. I prefer to use stock when at all possible. Much more repeatable in quality, hardness, easier to hold in collets and chucks with less runnout, etc. Plus I stock it in my shop. Not much point in using a tool steel like W1 on a part you are not going to heat treat.

  16. #16
    Boolit Master map55b's Avatar
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    Oil hardened drill rod or 4140 pre heat treated are my two go to materials for making parts.

  17. #17
    Boolit Master
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    I'm gonna go the emery route for the existing part. Though I will want to make one, I mean it's fun

    Ive been teaching myself CAD the last few months, dabbled in sketchup for a year prior and in the 90s I toyed with 3dsmax. Nowadays it's fusion 360 which is very powerful for being a free program, threw this together and made a 3d part, then a drawing.



    Units in mm. I'm in Finland you see. Based on how evenly some units came out I am willing to guess Uberti "metricized" some of the parts, only "proper" inch dimension I found using my calipers was the diameter which is exactly 1/4"

  18. #18
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkf View Post
    Grade 8 hardware can vary quite a bit and machineability often leaves a lot to be desired. I machine them plenty enough in my day job. If I have to machine fasteners or a part from a fastener I would much rather use a SHCS or similar fastener that are usually black oxide coated. They are stronger than grade 8 and a little harder but still below 40Rc, surface finish is usually nicer. I prefer to use stock when at all possible. Much more repeatable in quality, hardness, easier to hold in collets and chucks with less runnout, etc. Plus I stock it in my shop. Not much point in using a tool steel like W1 on a part you are not going to heat treat.
    I have various stock and shafting in more suitable dimensions as well. some 8mm shafting might be the most suitable I got, and some 12mm mild steel round stock.

  19. #19
    Boolit Master dikman's Avatar
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    Clean up the original, but by all means have a go at making a replacement. It may take a while but it's good practice on the lathe. I had to make a cylinder pin for my Remington 1858, it works fine but the cold blueing doesn't last very long due to the constant wear!

  20. #20
    Boolit Master

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    Mild steel will be fine(12L14) when you go the "make it" route. Heat treating long/skinny usually means warping and grind to finish. If you want to try something a bit different than cold blue, place your polished part (on top) in a small container of sand or brass lathe chips and heat the whole thing up with a propane torch and watch your part change color, when it get to the level blue you want, quench it in oil (I use vegetable oil) Couple of things to be aware of: Be sure that the part is completely degreased, I use alcohol. After you degrease it do not touch it, even with with bare fingers. The quality of your blue will be in direct proportion on how you finish the metal. With practice you will be able to put a peacock blue on any of your non-critical parts and it wears much better than a cold blue application but less than a black oxide. Have fun with your new lathe.
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