Lee PrecisionTitan ReloadingGraf & SonsInline Fabrication
StainLess Steel MediaMidSouth Shooters SupplyADvertise hereRotoMetals2

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 40

Thread: 110 or 220V's

  1. #1
    Boolit Mold
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    6

    110 or 220V's

    Looking to buy a melting pot. Lot's of model come in either 110V or 220V. I have 220V readily available in my garage. What the benefit of one over the other?

  2. #2
    Boolit Master
    Plate plinker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,717
    Nothing really. Although I do like my heavy loads on 220v so as not to overburden a circuit. Usually (almost always its a dedicated circuit on my 220 stuff.

  3. #3
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Outside Rolla, Missouri
    Posts
    679
    In a heating element as small as a lead furnace, nothing. Provided they're the same wattage, if it's 1500 watts at 120 volts it will still be 1500 watts at 240 volt. The amp draw per leg will be reduced by half at 240 volts. At 240v it will simply be drawing it on two legs rather than one at 120v. 1500 watts at 240v will draw 6.25 amps and at 120v will be 12.5
    "In general, the art of government is to take as much money as possible from one class of citizens and give it to another class of citizens" Voltaire'

    The common virtue of capitalism is the sharing of equal opportunity. The common vice of socialism is the equal sharing of misery

    NRA Benefactor 2008

  4. #4
    Boolit Master

    alamogunr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,211
    I've got a 220V Pro Melt but only because it was on clearance for a very good discount and I have a 220V circuit for my table saw. Since I cast on top of the table saw(I put a cover on the table) I will never be needing both at the same time.

    The 220V furnace came with a European plug which had to be replaced but considering the discount, was no big deal.
    John
    W.TN

  5. #5
    Boolit Master
    Mal Paso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Carmel, Ca
    Posts
    1,937
    For 1500 watts or less 120V is enough and plugs in more places.
    Mal

    Mal Paso means Bad Pass, just so you know.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master


    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    longview,tx
    Posts
    2,550
    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Paso View Post
    For 1500 watts or less 120V is enough and plugs in more places.
    I agree!

  7. #7
    Boolit Bub
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    36
    I have a lee 120v 20lb pot and a hot plate. Would that be to much for 120 volts.

  8. #8
    Boolit Master Grmps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    2,173
    Quote Originally Posted by RAK2018 View Post
    I have a lee 120v 20lb pot and a hot plate. Would that be too much for 120 volts.
    That depends on the size (AMP's) of the breaker and what else you have on that circuit. Check the amperage rating (draw) of the 2 items and check the breaker for the outlet, also see what else is drawing powder off that same breaker.

  9. #9
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    North Queensland Australia
    Posts
    161
    My definition of using single phase against multiple phase, is that it is easier for two or three people to push a car up a hill than one large man to do the same thing.

  10. #10
    Boolit Master

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    England,Ar
    Posts
    3,585
    I can’t really think of an advantage in having a load that small on 240 volts. If you have 240 volts available in your casting area and find a bargain on a 240 volt pot, then go far it. Using 120 volts is much more versatile and an 800-850 watt heating element is really not a great big load. I recently started having a couple of buddies come over to cast. We set up in my shop and cast on my steel work table. At first, we had 3 lead pots and a hot plate plugged into the same 20 amp circuit along with an 8ft light and a radio And had no problems. That did load that circuit pretty good and I’ve since split that circuit up.

  11. #11
    Boolit Master
    Mal Paso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Carmel, Ca
    Posts
    1,937
    Three phase only has mechanical advantage in motors, none in heating elements, almost no one has it in their homes, you would need a 500 pound pot to justify it.

    This discussion is all single phase 120/240 volt. A 20 amp 120v circuit max is 2400 watts, the recommended safe load is 80% or 1920 watts. 1440 watts for 15 amps. My old pot was 700 watts and the hot plate 1500 so I ran an extension cord from another circuit for the hot plate. I would not bother with 240 volt unless a single piece of equipment was over 1800 watts. 240V is not cheaper and plugging in is more complicated.

    Heat loads are the sort of thing that burn through the quick connections on the back of wall plugs. Side wired to the screws is best. If you don't know the quality of your house wiring, take it easy.
    Last edited by Mal Paso; 02-25-2018 at 11:52 AM.
    Mal

    Mal Paso means Bad Pass, just so you know.

  12. #12
    Boolit Master
    dragon813gt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Somewhere in SE PA
    Posts
    8,866
    Quote Originally Posted by iomskp View Post
    My definition of using single phase against multiple phase, is that it is easier for two or three people to push a car up a hill than one large man to do the same thing.
    I doubt anyone has three phase in their home. If they have a large shop they might. But that's the only way. 120/240 are both single phase. Ohms law comes into play w/ this discussion. Watts are still watts and amps are still amps. If you have a 240 outlet available then get a 240 pot. Otherwise just get a 120 pot. Larger equipment and loads is when you want three phase for a myriad of reasons.

  13. #13
    Boolit Master

    Mike W1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Rural Sumner, IA
    Posts
    1,061
    I believe what we call 120/240 in our household wiring is called 240 center tapped. It's still single phase. I had extra breaker space in my little shop so the 2 pots and the hot plate each have their own breakers. Overkill but nice.
    Mike

    Benefactor Member NRA
    Life Member Iowa Firearms Coalition
    US Army Vet

    There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation.
    One is by the sword. The other is by debt.
    John Adams 1826

  14. #14
    Boolit Mold
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    6
    Thanks for all the replies! Looks like a 120V unit will suffice.

    Now I remember why I became a Mechanical Engineer and not an Electrical Engineer.

  15. #15
    Boolit Master woodbutcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    LaFollette Tn
    Posts
    978
    What would be really nice is a setup like on computers.They have a little slide switch on the power supply.Slide it one direction and you have 110V selected.Slide the other way and you have 220 selected.Super simple.Plus 220 uses less amps which means less power consumed and less electric expense.
    Good luck.have fun.Be safe.
    Leo
    People never lie so much as after a hunt,during a war,or before an election.
    Otto von Bismarck

  16. #16
    Boolit Master
    dragon813gt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Somewhere in SE PA
    Posts
    8,866
    Quote Originally Posted by woodbutcher View Post
    Plus 220 uses less amps which means less power consumed and less electric expense.
    No it doesn't. Watts are watts. 10 amps at 110 volts is 1100 watts. 5 amps at 220 volts is 1100 watts. There are lots of reasons for using 220 over 110. Reduced power consumption is not one of them.

  17. #17
    Boolit Master woodbutcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    LaFollette Tn
    Posts
    978
    Hi Dragon.Thanks for clearing that up for me.Was always told what I posted.
    Good luck.Have fun.Be safe.
    Leo
    People never lie so much as after a hunt,during a war,or before an election.
    Otto von Bismarck

  18. #18
    Boolit Master

    alamogunr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,211
    I should also mention that I've also got a 110V Lee pot. When I got my PID, I asked about the two voltages. The maker(JConn, web site since disappeared) said that the devices, in his anyway, worked on both 110V and 220V. I have since proved it several times. I don't know if that is the norm. I did have to make up two different pigtails to avoid using the wrong one with the higher voltage.
    John
    W.TN

  19. #19
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Lynn Ma
    Posts
    257
    I put in a dedicated 20 amp 110 volt line for my Pro Melt and my table saw so I don't worry about popping a circuit breaker elsewhere in the house.

  20. #20
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    60
    Imagine you have a nice thick milkshake. It's so thick that it's difficult to slurp up with a regular straw so you get a straw with hole exactly twice the size of the regular straw (a fatter straw). You enjoy your milkshake and drink it all.

    The single straw is equivalent to a 110v circuit
    The large (fat) straw is equivalent to a 220v circuit.
    The milkshake itself is the equivalent to the Watts.

    So, whether you chose a skinny straw or a fat straw, at the end of the day you've consumed the same amount of milkshake (Watts).

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check