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Thread: ruger SBH bisley hunter trigger

  1. #21
    Boolit Master Oklahoma Rebel's Avatar
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    when I next have the available money, I am planning on sending my cylinder to you anyways, so if you could pm me a quote I would appreciate it!, my only question is, once you remove the metal, will those parts wear out any sooner? it just seems that once you reduce the surface, and it starts to wear, there would be less metal to " wear through" before having problems..... I am probably worrying too much, I usually do, I know that the components are very hard, and even if they ever wore out it would be a cheap replacement part/parts.... thanks dougguy~!
    An armed man in a citizen.
    An unarmed man is a subject.
    A disarmed man is a slave.

  2. #22
    Boolit Man wildcatter's Avatar
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    I do my own triggers and they are 2.5 to 2.8 pound with all creep removed, and fired 1000's of rounds and have not changed. Some have over 5000 rounds on them. If properly done it will actually wear less because it will be a better polished finish on the hammer than it comes from the factory. This means less friction, and that means less wear. You will be soooo much happier with your purchase,, feeling is believing.

  3. #23
    Boolit Master newton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcatter View Post
    I do my own triggers and they are 2.5 to 2.8 pound with all creep removed, and fired 1000's of rounds and have not changed. Some have over 5000 rounds on them. If properly done it will actually wear less because it will be a better polished finish on the hammer than it comes from the factory. This means less friction, and that means less wear. You will be soooo much happier with your purchase,, feeling is believing.
    I spent most of the day yesterday searching the web for how this job is done on Rugers. Seems pretty straightforward, as long as you FULLY understand how the sear/hammer interface and how the action works. Once I got that down, then the way people described how to do it made perfect sense.

    I fully believe that a trigger job will help, especially with a gun like the super blackhawk hunter. I could understand not worrying about a plinking/point and shoot type gun, but one that you will be aiming very carefully and squeezing off a round HAS to benifit from getting rid of the rough trigger creep.

    I'm going to tear mine down starting tonight and take a look. I can see where it is intimidating to tackle. I've been there. But after seeing how the action works I am positive it is something I can tackle. The way I see it, if I am going to rebuild the transmission in my truck(hopefully soon) then I should be able to handle a trigger job.

    How do you do it wildcatter? I know there are two different ways that people get rid of the creep.

  4. #24
    Boolit Master oldhenry's Avatar
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    Newton,
    The best way to proceed is in stages. A little removal at a time, then reassemble & test.

    I'd also suggest that the actual hook surface not be altered in any way: just reduce the depth of the hook (in stages).

    Also: make sure your screw diver bits are hollow ground & fit the screw slots perfectly (my Bisleys also have some hex head socket screws).

    Good luck
    Henry

  5. #25
    Boolit Bub
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    I have done a couple of triggers on my personal 1911s. It was not terribly difficult, but the first one was a little intimidating. It went well and so did the others. Let us know how it goes. I have a Ruger too that could definitely benefit from some work.

  6. #26
    Boolit Man wildcatter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldhenry View Post
    Newton,
    The best way to proceed is in stages. A little removal at a time, then reassemble & test.

    I'd also suggest that the actual hook surface not be altered in any way: just reduce the depth of the hook (in stages).

    Also: make sure your screw diver bits are hollow ground & fit the screw slots perfectly (my Bisleys also have some hex head socket screws).

    Good luck
    Henry
    Solid advice, I use a dremel with a buffing pad and jewlers rouge to lightly polish the surface the sear rides on, but never touch it with a file or a stone. I stone the hamer to shrten the depth, like oldhenry said,, a little goes a long a way, for the first one, tiny steps are important. It is easy to take back apart and take a little more, but you can't tear it down and add once you go to far! Patience can't be stressed enough here, and one other thing, never weaken a hammer spring!

    If you have any doubt's, a $60.00 action job from the likes of David Clements is pretty cheap compared to an unsafe job! Good Luck!

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check