Inline FabricationLee PrecisionStainLess Steel MediaADvertise here
Graf & SonsRotoMetals2MidSouth Shooters SupplyTitan Reloading

Donate Now Goal amount for this year: 6000 USD, Received: 3800 USD (63%)
Our Annual server fund drive is going on now! This donation drive helps fund Cast Boolits for an entire year, and helps support our 2nd amendment rights! You can donate by Paypal by clicking the DONATE button. Or by Cash / Check / MO to the address below:

Willy Snyder
PO Box 2732
Pocatello, ID 83206
****Due to overwhelming e-mails, I will be very slow in updating this list. Please bear with me!****


Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Help with ID'ing a single shot .22

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy Xringshooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    State College, PA
    Posts
    51

    Help with ID'ing a single shot .22

    Wasn't sure where to put this, if it needs moved that is fine.

    Customer brought this in to me to help him ID and date (even if approximate).

    The Barrel is 20 1/8" on the top of the barrel is says: MADE BY THE HOPKINS & ALLEN MANFG. CO. NORWICH, CONN USA just below that it says: THE MERWIN HULBERT& CO JUNIOR.

    I am guessing the name of the.22 is a "Junior" Down on the right side of the lever it has the numbers 328, don't know if that is some kind of a s/n or not.

    It appears to be functionable but needs the extractor (left side by the chamber replacded as it's worn and will not pull a spent case out but I can't find a replacement)

    My thoughts is that it needs to become a wall hanger once we get some background info about it. Previous owner(s) (grandfather, great grandfather? aren't around any more)

    Any help would be appreciated. Thank you very much.

    Here's some pics




    Ron
    USAF Ret (E-8) (1971-1997)
    NRA Benefactor

  2. #2
    Boolit Master

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Puyallup, Washington
    Posts
    1,903
    Looks like a Hopkin and Allen

  3. #3
    Boolit Master 35isit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central Ky
    Posts
    162
    Merwin & Hulbert were designers and sellers of revolvers in the 1880's up until the 1900's. I have seen a couple of their firearms in person. I believe original specimens are quite sought after. According to Wikipedia they had several companies manufacture guns for them. Among them was Hopkins & Allen. So it's possible they did make this for Merwin & Hulbert to sell.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merwin_Hulbert
    Ky State Director IHMSA
    Hunter Ed Instructor
    NRA Life Member

  4. #4
    Boolit Master marlinman93's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,246
    It is exactly as it's marked, a Hopkins and Allen built for Merwin and Hulbert to sell. It is the "Junior" model under the Merwin & Hulbert name.

  5. #5
    Boolit Master pietro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    3,176
    .

    H&A started building RF cartridge guns before 1870, and guns made prior to 1896 were marked HOPKINS & ALLEN MANUFG. CO. NORWICH CONN, also had various private trade names stamped on them - one of which was MERWIN, HULBERT & COMPANY.

    The most commonly seen model was the Junior - which was known after 1902 as the 922 (.22LR), 925 (.25RF), and 932 (.32RF).

    Those were not model numbers, they were catalog numbers.

    Because of the markings, your Junior was made sometime prior to 1896, and the bore is most likely like a sewer pipe due to the corrosive ammo of the time.

    IDK of any published H&A serial number dating lists at this time.

    I would strongly advise the owner to shoot only standard velocity ammo in it.


    .
    Last edited by pietro; 02-13-2018 at 05:06 PM.
    Experience is a wonderful thing - It lets you recognize a mistake, when you make it again.

  6. #6
    Boolit Buddy Xringshooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    State College, PA
    Posts
    51
    These I think will help the owner decide that maybe it's ready to be retired.

    The problem is that it actually shoots ok (according to the owner) but since the extractor is so worn it won't pull the case out and they manually (with a pen knife) pry the case out after each shot.

    The bore, for being as old as it is, is in remarkably good condition, so it was well taken care of through the years.

    I knew I could count on the members here to help, I really appreciate it thanks for all the answers.
    Ron
    USAF Ret (E-8) (1971-1997)
    NRA Benefactor

  7. #7
    Boolit Master
    NoZombies's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    N. Florida
    Posts
    2,066
    Parts aren't easy to find for these. If the bore is decent, and the lockup isn't bad (the actions on these tended to wear pretty well) then it probably is worth making a new extractor for.
    Nozombies.com Practical Zombie Survival

    I collect all things .32. If you have something you don't need, please let me know!

  8. #8
    Boolit Man
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    NW Oklahoma
    Posts
    129
    Too bad everybody seemed to use a screwdriver or thick knife to extract casings as it really messed up the receiver. Cool looking rifle besides the damage. My grandfather had a Stevens Favorite in .22 that couldn't be repaired but it was from much use not abuse. During the depression that rifle was the gamegetter for the whole family. Hard to imagine a lowly .22 single shot keeping a family alive in hard times with all the high powered guns we have today.

  9. #9
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4,900
    Numrich Gunparts have some parts for several models of these rifles. but very unsurprisingly the extractors seem to have been used up. It would be possible to build up the extractor with weld and reshape it. Or silver solder on a small piece of steel, which could be harder wearing than the original. You should make the joint slanting for maximum strength. I'd use an air hardening steel, but that would have to be shaped mostly before soldering, or with diamond burrs.

  10. #10
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Outside Rolla, Missouri
    Posts
    705
    Quote Originally Posted by Oily View Post
    Hard to imagine a lowly .22 single shot keeping a family alive in hard times with all the high powered guns we have today.
    Yes sir, but that was before all game animals grew armor plate and unless a; cartridge, bullet, rifle, sighting system or powder is "new and improved" and wins a popularity contest it is obsolete and incapable of taking game.
    "In general, the art of government is to take as much money as possible from one class of citizens and give it to another class of citizens" Voltaire'

    The common virtue of capitalism is the sharing of equal opportunity. The common vice of socialism is the equal sharing of misery

    NRA Benefactor 2008

  11. #11
    Boolit Master

    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Northwest Ohio
    Posts
    8,725
    a lot of these single shot 22s were either boys rifles or butcher rifles. The boys used them pretty hard a lot of times. The butcher rifles were used to put animals down for butchering small light and handy was the main requirement as shots were literally at the muzzle. But these little 22s put a lot of cattle and big hogs down for the tables.

  12. #12
    Boolit Master marlinman93's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,246
    The extractor is an easy fix, and shouldn't cost much to repair. I take them to a local welder and he usually charges me $10 to build up the extractor with his tig welder. Then I take it home and file or stone it down until it fits and extracts well. If the gun works well otherwise, that's what I'd do with it.

  13. #13
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Roseau, Mn
    Posts
    228
    Here's what I know about fixing on these. I have one in 32, long story short it is now (by me) a 32 S&W long. I shoot lighter loads with Ranier plated boolits. My bore is terrible, that's where the plated pills are working. I've done just about enough on this where it's either quit altogether, or get it lined. The extractor was well worn. They tend to shift to the left (as looking at the chamber) and slip off the rim. It measures about .105 in thickness, I first used 12 ga. steel to copy to a new one but the pocket it sits in is worn well enough it still shifted off. So I started over. Make an extractor that has a thicker bottom to it, that will hold it more square to the mount screw. Then unfortunately you have to mill away the extra to get it to the thickness required to fill your slot and stay clear of the falling block when it's opened. This is all harder to explain than to just show in a picture. But the worst about it is, the chamber from the rim to about 1/4" up has a void (open) for this extractor. Things just seem to get a little more complicated as you go if all these areas are wore out! So, you wanna line the barrel? I think it would be great, just have to drill it from the muzzle end because I'm afraid the void in the chamber would raise hell with your drill bit. But, I really like the gun a lot. It's a very handy little bugger for just about anything, kids really like it too.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check