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Thread: muzzleloader ?

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy
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    muzzleloader ?

    Just a thought. I recently have gotten a inline .50 muzzleloader. After reading here on cleanup and stuff. Have shot a total of 12 rounds. In between have put dry patches. But cleanup, that crud ring. Question i have, how did we win any wars with these things.

  2. #2
    Boolit Master FrontierMuzzleloading's Avatar
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    #11 and musket ignition sidelocks or even flintlocks never had the crud ring problem. Plus, paper wadding in the Revolution never caused a crud ring. When those guns were of the time, they were common use tools for hunters and especially for troops that training with them and knew their weapons.

  3. #3
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    The other side was slower! But, seriously, the answer provided by FrontierMuzzleloadin gives a good explanation.

  4. #4
    Boolit Master
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    I think some of the use issues included natural lubes and black powder. I would speculate that the barrels were "seasoned" to operate with the materials at hand.

  5. #5
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    7 shots with a wipe in-between and that ring. got my ramrod stuck on it. Soaking and many scrubbings and it's almost clean. Is there a way to stop that crud ring. I hear bore butter can help.
    Last edited by krallstar; 01-10-2018 at 03:14 PM.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master
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    You didn't say what powder you're using. Triple7 gave rise to the word "crud ring". Other black powder subs leave residue also, but not nearly as much. If you're wiping with a dry patch as stated, you're doing it wrong. You need to use a wet patch followed by at least one dry patch, preferably two dry patches. A dry patch alone won't do much to get the crud ring out.

  7. #7
    Boolit Buddy
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    Yup, Triple 7 powder. Going to try blackhorn 209 next. Wet patch, i hear 50-50 water and amonia works

  8. #8
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    Part of how we won was that we "aimed smaller" had sights on our rifles instead of bayonet lugs, used hunting rifles and picked off their officers when ever we had a chance... powder was also different back then as well as what they used in the field to wipe with... I understand sheep tallow was often used...
    Perhaps my learning skills have diminished in my senior years.. 50 years ago I could read something once and then "have it"... Now I read it about three times, do it a couple of times and then... "have it" only about half the time.

  9. #9
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by krallstar View Post
    Yup, Triple 7 powder. Going to try blackhorn 209 next. Wet patch, i hear 50-50 water and amonia works
    Just get some Hoppe's #9 for the Blackhorn 209. It cleans up really easy.

  10. #10
    Boolit Master
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    I've read people are fond of Black MZ as well. A lot cheaper than BH209, but not as energetic either.

  11. #11
    Boolit Grand Master

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    To answer your question factually, they used real black powder back then!
    Wayne the Shrink

    There is no 'right' that requires me to work for you or you to work for me!

  12. #12
    Boolit Buddy
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    All good info. Thanks guys

  13. #13
    Boolit Master
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    The cheapest and also about as energetic is Olde Eynsford by Goex.

  14. #14
    Boolit Master
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    Mainly due to each side having equal technology until one has better tactics more troops etc then the balance shifts.

  15. #15
    Boolit Master Shawlerbrook's Avatar
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    Yes, tactics. In the Revoluntionary War the Brits use the old skirmish line, while are patriots used more gorilla and hunting tactics. Also responsible is the fact that men fighting on their home turf, defending what they truly believe in will defeat a paid Army acting as invaders for a far away government. Actually the Vietnam war had that in common with the US Revolution.

  16. #16
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    back in the F&I and rev wars 18th century they used gunpowder (what we call black powder today) and it mostly came in limited rather course granularity (no 4f or even 3f). how the guns were loaded depended on more than a few things, and for the most part what mattered far more than overall accuracy for warfare or self defense was reliability and speed of loading. no fine powder for the pan and no ball starters. cloth patching was not the norm - cloth and even paper was expensive (though the military used paper "cartridges" for faster loading) - either no patching was used with just a ball or rock or whatever sitting on powder, or some type of plant wadding was used for ball or shot, such as tow or leaves or bark or, wasp nest, yup - whatever. think about it - these guns HAD to work for them, no matter what. it was life or death times. their attitude about guns and loads were, for the very most part, vastly different from most of our thinking here in the 21st century.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by krallstar View Post
    Just a thought. I recently have gotten a inline .50 muzzleloader. After reading here on cleanup and stuff. Have shot a total of 12 rounds. In between have put dry patches. But cleanup, that crud ring. Question i have, how did we win any wars with these things.
    use real black powder. better yet, try using a real trad sidelock muzzleloader, and learn how best to load it in terms of ball diameter, patch thickness, and powder charge. good luck, have fun.
    NRA LIFE ~ NRA RSO ~ Black Powder Gang ~ Traditional Muzzleloading Association ~ Buffalo Rifles ~ Trad Gang
    The .45-70 is the only government I trust.

  18. #18
    Boolit Buddy
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    I Plan on a traditional some time soon. Love the look of those muzzleloaders

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Themoose View Post
    Part of how we won was that we "aimed smaller" had sights on our rifles instead of bayonet lugs, used hunting rifles and picked off their officers when ever we had a chance... powder was also different back then as well as what they used in the field to wipe with... I understand sheep tallow was often used...
    Not that this helps the OP with fouling, but the Revolutionary War was won using the smoothbore musket and mastering standard infantry tactics of the 18th Century, not rifles in the hands of sharpshooters hiding behind trees. We beat the best army in the world at their own game... you can thank Von Steuben for that.

    I couldn’t imagine being armed with only a patched ball rifle in a battle like Brooklyn, Brandywine, Monmouth, or Cowpens. I’d be transfixed on a Grenadier’s bayonet in no time. No sir... I’ll take a musket, paper cartridges, and a bayonet over a slow, fragile hunting rifle.

  20. #20
    Boolit Master
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    Their experiences in the American War of independence,proved to Great Britain that fire power although valuable was not the total answer to warfare.Accuracy was not considered important until they came against Rifled weaponry since the traditional Squares and Lines had been in use for a few centuries.Colonial Troops where in the main supplied with Smooth bore Muskets but amongst them skirmishers equipped with Rifled Hunting Weapons took their toll on selected targets.The Baker Rifle was a direct result of the American experience and proved its worth in other more successful theatres.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check