Lee PrecisionMidSouth Shooters SupplyTitan ReloadingGraf & Sons
StainLess Steel MediaRotoMetals2ADvertise hereInline Fabrication

Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Problem with factory 44-40 rounds and lever guns

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    61

    Problem with factory 44-40 rounds and lever guns

    Hi i am currently helping out a friend of mine with his marlin 1890s era lever gun. When you go to load the gun full of factory ammo (hornady cowboy loads) it holds 12
    As you cycle it some of the bullets are getting pushed into the cartridge. Last i knew factory ammo shouldnt do that. They are cast lead bullets. Im thinking a heaver crimp will solve it but is it the shells or the gun thats causing the issue.

  2. #2
    Moderator



    JonB_in_Glencoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Land of 10,000 Lakes
    Posts
    9,597
    I moved your thread to a more appropriate forum.
    -------------------

    Does the bullet have a crimp groove?

  3. #3
    Boolit Master Outpost75's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    over the hill, out in the woods and far away
    Posts
    5,209
    If the .44-40 rounds you have are new Hornady cowboy loads with lead bullets, and are telescoping, they are DEFECTIVE and you should contact them to get instructions for return and replacement.

    Traditional lead .44-40 bullets did not require a crimp groove, because a compressed charge of black powder gave base support to the bullet. Traditional style bullets such as the Ideal #427098 can be loaded with smokeless IF you use a powder such as RL7 which fills the case, and can be safely loaded in a compressed charge which supports the bullet in the same manner that black powder does. A charge of 26.5 grains of RL7 with a 200-215 grain .430" lead bullet is safe in the 1873 Winchester and approximates the velocity of traditional black powder loads.

    If using small charges of dense, fast-burning smokeless powders in the .44-40, it is necessary that the bullet have a crimp groove, that case necks and bullets be sized to provide a correct fit, and the case mouths securely crimped.

    The Accurate 43-215C bullet is of traditional design with adequate lubricant capacity to prevent foul-out with black powder, and also has a correctly designed crimp groove for use with smokeless. If you don't cast your own, I can recommend without reservation the .430" diameter, 215-grain flatnose from Matt's bullets as giving good results with either black or smokeless:

    http://www.mattsbullets.com/index.ph...roducts_id=275
    The ENEMY is listening.
    HE wants to know what YOU know.
    Keep it to yourself.

  4. #4
    Moderator



    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Posts
    3,074
    It's a combination of not enough neck tension and not enough crimp. Since the .44-40 (.40 WCF) case is thin walled, everything has to be right to keep the rounds from collapsing under spring tension in the magazine. A lot of tube magazines also have springs that are stronger than they need to be. I've cut coils off several magazine springs and they still work fine, and are easier to load. I normally leave about 4 coils above the end of the magazine tube when it's just resting in the tube, with the end cap off.

    Hope this helps.

    Fred
    After a shooting spree, they always want to take the guns away from the people who didn't do it. - William S. Burroughs.

  5. #5
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    61
    Ok well i will have to see if they have a crimp groove. And ill see ablut that spring as well.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master

    Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    N Central Florida
    Posts
    976
    I'd go crimp groove over defacing.

    You can cut a spring short, can't cut one longer.

  7. #7
    Boolit Master Outpost75's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    over the hill, out in the woods and far away
    Posts
    5,209
    As FYI, when setting up to reload .44-40s, I do a "push test" using a dummy round, pressing the nose against a bathroom scale.

    If the cartridge assembly will withstand a 30-pound push for 5 seconds without shortening, it should not telescope in the magazine.

    30 pounds is a low limit for a cartridge "push-test" by the way. The spec. for .45 ACP Ball M1911 is 45 pounds.
    The ENEMY is listening.
    HE wants to know what YOU know.
    Keep it to yourself.

  8. #8
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    61
    Ok im going to try that as well. Thanks!! ��

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check