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Thread: Muzzle loading drop tube

  1. #1
    Boolit Mold
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    Muzzle loading drop tube

    Has anybody tried this? Saw it on a Pedrosoli you tube shot. The shooter put in a drop tube, then dropped the powder charge in. If I remember right, he was loading a Whitworth pattern rifle. Do you suppose there is any benefit to this! binski

  2. #2
    Boolit Master
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    Yes and now as it depends on your rifle and how you shoot it. If you look in the NMLRA website where they talk about the 1000 yard long range matches, just about everyone uses a tube of some sorts. They also generally wipe 1 wet, 2 dry after a shot and since my home range only goes to 300 yards I tried all of those combinations and in my case.....no difference. My mentor, Doug said to use a tube so I do and I have to be very careful and look down it as I have several instances where the tube got plugged and the gun only goes pffffft!
    John

  3. #3
    Boolit Master kens's Avatar
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    I saw the benchrest guys, the slug gun guys , do that.
    I never was good enough to need it.

  4. #4
    Boolit Mold
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    Where do you get these tubes? Are they homemade?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Regular Joe View Post
    Where do you get these tubes? Are they homemade?
    Yes, mine is 1/4" ID aluminum tube. I just use an MTM funnel that I fitted to it. Some LR shooters just use a short one to drop the charge. Lee Shaver believes that dirt build up on the tube can cause muzzle wear ruining accuracy. I use a long one because I use the Rigby method of cleaning and it gets the powder past the fouling in the barrel.
    With Rigby cleaning you drop the charge insert a wad and then clean to the wad. This keeps from pushing fouling into the patent breech which can cause a misfire.

    Bob
    GUNFIRE! The sound of Freedom!

  6. #6
    Boolit Master
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    Bob I got a brass one when I bought my Gibbs.

    Fly

  7. #7
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    I also have seen this used in a muzzleloader. Always contemplated building and using one but till i mount glass on a very good rifle i see no point as my guns all shoot better then i am capable of already. When i get glass mounted on a muzzleloader i for sure will build and try a drop tube. I see the advantage and believe a weighed charge to get compromised by dumping it either down a fouled bore where the charge has to pick up some of the fouling or a slightly wet bore from swabbing where the slight moisture has to affect the charge.

    I see benefit to drop tubing past any fouling and then running a lube wad or disc followed by a vegi wad of .060 + to enable swabbing the bore as explained above and lastly load the projectile.

    Sounds like a fun way to slow down even more for a relaxing fun range session. ]
    WHEN ALL IS SAID AND DONE...MORE WILL BE SAID THEN DONE

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fly View Post
    Bob I got a brass one when I bought my Gibbs.

    Fly
    I had the aluminum tube from another project and figured it would be as good as the brass or maybe better because it is softer and of course not near as heavy.
    Ted, the lube wad isn't really necessary since you are cleaning after every shot anyway. I went to the Rigby method of cleaning because it is faster. Most matches only give you about 3 minutes per shot and that is a lot of up & down and cleaning and doesn't leave much time to break a shot or wait out the wind. I have used both cork and felt wads and can't tell any difference. I have several friends that say the wad isn't important but my Gibbs doesn't shoot worth a hoot without it.

    Bob
    GUNFIRE! The sound of Freedom!

  9. #9
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    I kinda figure when you drop the charge down the barrel, it has already gone down a drop tube. Drop tubes are only useful for loading cartridges to gain maximum capacity in a given space.
    The solid soft lead bullet is undoubtably the best and most satisfactory expanding bullet that has ever been designed. It invariably mushrooms perfectly, and never breaks up. With the metal base that is essential for velocities of 2000 f.s. and upwards to protect the naked base, these metal-based soft lead bullets are splendid.
    John Taylor - "African Rifles and Cartridges"

    Forget everything you know about loading jacketed bullets. This is a whole new ball game!


  10. #10
    Boolit Master




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    To a certain point that is true, especially if you clean before loading. Most LR shooters use a long tube though, which includes most of the top notch competitors. The tube has the advantage of getting the powder where it is supposed to be without contamination or sticking to the side walls. At 1000+yd any variation can make a big difference in point of impact.
    To your point though Lee Shaver and Dave Munch, 2 long time members of the US Team use short tubes. Dave Gullo, Ray Hopkins and most of the other members of the team use long tubes. Personally I was taught with a long tube and my philosophy is if it works don't fix it. For all practical purposes it isn't a hassle to use. Kind of comes under that, "more than one way to skin a cat thing".


    Bob
    GUNFIRE! The sound of Freedom!

  11. #11
    Boolit Man heelerau's Avatar
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    I use a brass drop tube I bought from Peter Dyson and Son , England. I use it when shooting my Parker Hale .451 Volunteer and it works a treat. Ideal when loading long range muzzle loading rifles. Mine is a first generation Rigby rifled two band rifle.

    Cheers

    Heelerau
    Keep yor hoss well shod an' yo powda dry !

  12. #12
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boz330 View Post
    Yes, mine is 1/4" ID aluminum tube. I just use an MTM funnel that I fitted to it. Some LR shooters just use a short one to drop the charge. Lee Shaver believes that dirt build up on the tube can cause muzzle wear ruining accuracy. I use a long one because I use the Rigby method of cleaning and it gets the powder past the fouling in the barrel.
    With Rigby cleaning you drop the charge insert a wad and then clean to the wad. This keeps from pushing fouling into the patent breech which can cause a misfire.


    Bob
    They also can prevent powder bridging with a patent breech which i find particularly annoying in a flintlock.

  13. #13
    Boolit Master



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    For paper patched projectiles it is pretty much standard. For cloth patched RB I found no difference hence unnecessary.

  14. #14
    Boolit Master
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    When loading my .565 Whitworth Match rifle I load then wipe.Working to Joseph Whitworth specs using a Hollow base Hollow Nose wooden Plug Bullet.With this method I find that the Breach is clear of damp residue.For this Rifle a Drop Tube would have little use since the powder is dropped into a dry albeit fouled barrel prior to loading the Bullet then wiping.Click image for larger version. 

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    Since the Bullet is Hollow based the rifle cannot be wiped on top of a wad.The bullet is straight on the powder charge.

  15. #15
    Boolit Master
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    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	side pour mould for large whitworth Rifle 001.jpg 
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    Side pour Mould for large calibre Whitworth match Rifle.It is a modified for length Lyman Mould with side pour to cast both Base and Nose cavities.After fitting the Nose Plug and trimming off the side Sprue the Bullets are swaged to size.A lot of trouble to cast some Ammo but they Hit nose on at 500 Yards and the Hollow Base expands to the Whitworth Hexagonal bore.
    Last edited by Col4570; 01-09-2018 at 07:34 PM.

  16. #16
    Boolit Master
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    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Two Whitworth rifles 001.jpg 
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    The top one takes the Hollow Base Hollow Nose Bullet.it was built in 1863.
    The Bottom one is the .451 Whitworth built by Beasley Brothers who did in fact supply the confederacy.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check