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Thread: Knurling the boolit ?

  1. #1
    Boolit Master Digger's Avatar
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    Knurling the boolit ?

    When I picked up a deal on a Metallic 2 back when .....
    also in the odds and ends was this "knurling " setup .. maybe a CH ?
    Any how , what is the purpose or was the purpose of the Knurling process ? , if any one would know.
    appreciate it much.

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    Team Hollywood !
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  2. #2
    Boolit Master Hannibal's Avatar
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    The only benefit I am aware of to 'knurling' cast bullets is to facilitate the application of grit for fire lapping.

    If someone has other information, I'd be curious to hear it.
    Missing the target is not the worst thing you can do.
    Not taking the shot is.

  3. #3
    Boolit Master


    Nueces's Avatar
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    That is the CH cannelure tool, for rolling a crimping cannelure into a swaged jacketed bullet. The knurled edge acts as a driver to rotate the bullet during the operation.
    Last edited by Nueces; 12-26-2017 at 11:43 AM.

  4. #4
    Boolit Master Hannibal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nueces View Post
    That is the CH cannelure tool, for rolling a crimping cannelure into a swaged jacketed bullet. The knurled edge acts as a driver to rotated the bullet during the operation.
    Ah! That makes perfect sense.
    Missing the target is not the worst thing you can do.
    Not taking the shot is.

  5. #5
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    it also helps with holding lube, lots of tumble lube boolits use this

  6. #6
    Boolit Master Traffer's Avatar
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    The only lead knurled bullets I know of are for 22 rim fire bullets. You may notice that they are all knurled. It is because the bearing surface is the same diameter as the case and therefore the bearing surface is on the outside of the case. So there is no where to put lube except on the outside of the bullet. Bullet manufacturers use the knurled surface to hold the lube. There is no need for this when powder coating. Which is why I believe that 22 rim fire bullets will be powder coated in the future. I have been loading non knurled 22 rim fire for the past couple of years. I have also knurled 22 rim fire bullets to hold the lube in the past. Here are some representative pictures.
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ID:	210286 This last picture is of a knurled semi-wad cutter that I made early on in my development of 22LR reloads. It has a nice deep knurl for lube.
    AKA hans.pcguy

  7. #7
    Boolit Master Hannibal's Avatar
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    The OP does not specify the caliber, but given the description, I do not think they are 22 RF bullets. (?)
    It appears that the mechanism is adjustable for caliber. (?)

    Not to hold anything back from Traffer. That is 'Way cool!'

    I wish I could do that.
    Missing the target is not the worst thing you can do.
    Not taking the shot is.

  8. #8
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    the op's pic is a gannelure tool it is used for all calibers.
    it come with the edge shown, one with 2 cannelures, a 3 place knurling tool, and a couple of other inserts could be made or used.
    I have the exact one shown [with the 3 inserts above] and they are meant to be mounted sideways not flat on the bench.
    I use it to add knurling for holding lube to my slick sided 358 swaged bullets and to add a cannelure my 44,22, 45, & 308 jacketed bullets.
    I also add cannelures to stuff like 230gr XTP's meant for the 45 acp so I can use them in my 45 colt lever guns.

    handy little tools to have around.
    it's all an educated guess,,,, till the trigger is pulled.

    this opinion brought to you by mister low-tech solution..

  9. #9
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    Seems like some of the .38 caliber swaged wadcutters I used years ago were knurled but as stated, the tool shown is a cannelure tool; not a knurler.
    Sometimes life taps you on the shoulder and reminds you it's a one way street. Jim Morris

  10. #10
    Boolit Master Hannibal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David2011 View Post
    Seems like some of the .38 caliber swaged wadcutters I used years ago were knurled but as stated, the tool shown is a cannelure tool; not a knurler.
    Just noticed your Sig line.

    A one way street?

    I hope not. I've made far too many mistakes.
    Missing the target is not the worst thing you can do.
    Not taking the shot is.

  11. #11
    Boolit Master
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    I think the "one way street" thing means that we're on the street from birth to death, just have to figure out how long a street that IS for you? Song lyrics @ http://www.songlyrics.com/jim-morris...-i-die-lyrics/

  12. #12
    Boolit Master Digger's Avatar
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    And so the education continues ...
    thank you so much gentlemen !, highly appreciate all the info .
    The boolit in the pics is my Hensley & Gibbs #20, 170 gr. that I scrounged a while back .
    So far it is an excellent performer in my 30 cal toys ..
    Once again , really appreciate the older items.
    Team Hollywood !
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    If you can read this in English , .. thank a Vet !

  13. #13
    Boolit Master JBinMN's Avatar
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    May not be particularly applicable to this topic, but you can "knurl" things by placing the item to be knurled in a vice with two files on each side in the jaws, tighten the vice just a bit depending on the material to be knurled & tap the end of the files towards the vice. The rotation of the item in the file "teeth" & proper pressure on it dependent on type of material, will sometimes knurl the item in between.

    I recall some folks doing that to piston skirts to help keep oil up on the cylinder walls & piston skirts for lubrication. I reckon it would do the same for boolits, although I wonder if one did it for boolits that way & it might cause gas cutting if too far down on the base. Some folks will try this on some types of tool shafts to aid in gripping them when they are greasy/slippery. ( Think "drifts", screwdriver shafts & socket extensions for example).

    Anyway, it was just a thought to share & if not applicable, then just forget about it. Consider it some possibly "useless" knowledge you now have in the back of your head, if ya did not know about it before. LOL
    "If ya don't like my gate, ya don't have to swing on the hinges..." - L. Ackerman ( RIP)
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  14. #14
    Boolit Master
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    I was thinking that a knurled J-word bullet would be great for removing stubborn leading. Now I might try it with the vise method.
    The only amendment the Democrats support is the 5th.

  15. #15
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    Dave at CH made a knurling attachment for a dedicated lead bullet customer. I bought one of the over run parts with the cannelur tool. It did a good job unless you pressed down too hard. Then the two rollers the bullet rides on would iron out telhe knurl.

  16. #16
    Boolit Master Victor N TN's Avatar
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    It looks identical to my C-H canneluring tool. I use it to put a crimp groove in jacketed bullets for my 300 WinMag. If they don't have it, the bullets will work back into the case with the hard recoil.
    Be careful,
    Victor

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    In regard to the avatar I made jacketed benchrest rifle bullets for several years. I do on occasion made a few thousand. But I don't do it EVERY DAY anymore.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBinMN View Post
    May not be particularly applicable to this topic, but you can "knurl" things by placing the item to be knurled in a vice with two files on each side in the jaws, tighten the vice just a bit depending on the material to be knurled & tap the end of the files towards the vice. The rotation of the item in the file "teeth" & proper pressure on it dependent on type of material, will sometimes knurl the item in between.

    I recall some folks doing that to piston skirts to help keep oil up on the cylinder walls & piston skirts for lubrication. I reckon it would do the same for boolits, although I wonder if one did it for boolits that way & it might cause gas cutting if too far down on the base. Some folks will try this on some types of tool shafts to aid in gripping them when they are greasy/slippery. ( Think "drifts", screwdriver shafts & socket extensions for example).

    Anyway, it was just a thought to share & if not applicable, then just forget about it. Consider it some possibly "useless" knowledge you now have in the back of your head, if ya did not know about it before. LOL
    You can just lay one file on a table and put a bullet or two on it and place another file on top and roll them. If you place the files in opposite direction from one another you get a different pattern.

    Knurling pistons was a cheat when the piston was worn undersize to the cylinder to get a tighter clearance. It doesn't last long.

  18. #18
    Boolit Master JBinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vzerone View Post
    You can just lay one file on a table and put a bullet or two on it and place another file on top and roll them. If you place the files in opposite direction from one another you get a different pattern.

    Knurling pistons was a cheat when the piston was worn undersize to the cylinder to get a tighter clearance. It doesn't last long.
    I suppose with lead it would not take much pressure. So, doing it on a table top would likely be just fine.

    Other, harder stuff, I think using the vise would be better.

    As far as the piston thing... Perhaps you and I are not talking about the same type of piston & cylinder relationship.

    The "rings" on the reciprocating engine pistons I was referring to, were what hold the piston in the cylinder to keep the piston ( & skirt) from riding the walls of the cylinder, while the skirt of the piston would get "splashed" by the crankcase oil & carry the oil(lube) up to the walls of the piston, while the lower "oil" ring(s) "washed" the oil back down the sides & the upper " compression" ings held the piston in place & sealed the combustion chamber off from the crankcase. When the piston "skirt" was to rub on the sides of the cylinder , we called it "Galling" of the piston or the cylinder ( or both) & that was usually due to some "slop" in the rings, the piston "wrist pin" & bushings , upper connecting rod bushings or some of all. None of which is desired. With the piston being "knurled" as was mentioned, it would help that oil "wash" from being wiped down as fast by the knurling. And yes, it was used as a "fix" & was not always a good one. Once the piston/cylinder get to "galling" it would be best to replace the parts mentioned since it means trouble if one does not. I imagine it would help though, even after a rebuild or reassembly to get & keep that crankcase oil washing the two areas.


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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by David2011 View Post
    Seems like some of the .38 caliber swaged wadcutters I used years ago were knurled but as stated, the tool shown is a cannelure tool; not a knurler.
    I've loaded many wax coated, knurled .38 wadcutters when I was starting out. They always leaded my bores. They were super soft. The ones we cast and lubed with 50-50 never gave that problem. I added any of the ones I had left to my pot.

    And that's definitely a cannelure tool for jacketed bullets. I believe you could also add a cannelure to a case if you wanted to.
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  20. #20
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    Knurling will increase the diameter of a bullet. I have knurled rods/axles when I needed a few thousandths to insure a snug fit. The cannalure tool will "cut" or "push" a groove in a round surface/rod/bullet just like a pipe cutter does (I actually made a "grooving" tool by dulling, rounding off the cutting wheel in a tubing cutter...).
    My Anchor is holding fast!

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BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
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LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check