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Thread: New lathe stand

  1. #1
    Boolit Master cheese1566's Avatar
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    New lathe stand

    When I first bought my Grizzly G0602, I did not get a stand and hastily fastened it in a desk. Worked ok but never highly rigid. I searched and looked for suitable stands but never happy. After 7 years I finally made this one. I have about $175 in it without the tool box. Next project after adjusting the gibs will be my 300blk suppressor (ATF Form 1 was just approved.)

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    I now have real adjusting feet; 1” bolts with welded nut inside tube, locking half nut, nestled in bored out rubber hockey pucks and a safety tab to anchor it to the floor.
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    Last edited by cheese1566; 12-24-2017 at 11:59 AM.

  2. #2
    Boolit Master

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    EXCELLENT!! I do have a question though: I am in the market to upgrade my Lathe from a G0765 to a Lathe with a larger Spindle bore. Are you satisfied with the 0602 or would you have rather had a lathe with a variable speed motor? Also, does the 0602 have metal or plastic gears?

  3. #3
    Boolit Master cheese1566's Avatar
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    Considering I was actually going to buy a mini lathe at the time I am happy with the 1” bore. The mini was backorded and my father talked me into the larger. It seems to do all I need since I don’t do any major gunsmithing or rebarreling. I have threaded 7/8-14” to make dies from round stock. It’s nice to be able to insert 7/8 stock or the 1” tubing I used for my last .22 suppressor.

    Variable speed wasn’t an option 7 years ago and I never ran one with, so I don’t know any different. Belt changes aren’t bad on it, but I do wish it had a slower speed for threading.

    Mine is all stock and has one large plastic gear off the rear spindle leading to the change gears for threading and auto feed. All the others internally and the change gears are metal. Never had an issue yet.

  4. #4
    Boolit Master

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    Thanks for the reply, I'm probably going to get the 0602 for the spindle size and metal gearing. I tried to buy one from Grizzly last week and they are "out of stock" and won't have any until the next boat comes in in Feb. They will have the G0602Z in the last of this month, but I didn't want the DRO it comes with and of course the additional cost. Guess I'll wait until Feb.
    BTW, could you expand a little about the stand you built? Looks to be made from 1.5 ~ 2" square tubing and appears very robust.

  5. #5
    Boolit Grand Master

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    Go for the variable speed if you can it will help get the best finish on different materials if you can easily swith and look for a lOW speed for threading or learn to thread backwards.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master cheese1566's Avatar
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    I google spanning bean stand and torsion beam stand and found lots of ideas. My main came from the stand the gentleman built in the link below. The G0602 doesn’t have a wide four point base like most lathes, but rather it sits on one main cast beam and only two anchor points,,, one on each end. The hockey puck legs came from google searches as well.

    The main box frame is 2” square 1/8” wall. The spanning beam is 5x3” rectangular tube and 3/16” thick. It is welded to 2.5x2.5” angle that is 3/16” as well. The original idea had the beam and angle resting on top the box frame and bolted. I didn’t see a need to remove it in the future so I welded it all together rather than bolt. The chip pan was found at Walmart in the automotive section. Rustoleum Hammered Deep Green matches pretty darn close.

    http://www.homemadetools.net/forum/b...he-stand-46704
    Last edited by cheese1566; 12-24-2017 at 01:36 PM.

  7. #7
    Boolit Master

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    Thanks; looks like a great shop project ! Hope mine turns out as good looking as yours.

  8. #8
    Boolit Master

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    BTW, I like the over head rack built for tooling (I assume).

  9. #9
    Boolit Master cheese1566's Avatar
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    Jury is out the overhead shelf. I had extra material so I added it. Once on, I noticed if I gave it a “whack” it would “twang” and I could feel the vibration to the middle of the main beam. I can’t feel it now with the lathe mass resting on it. See how it cuts and finishes.
    I didn’t go to wide with the overhead so it wasn’t over the spindle. Just enough shelf space and the front steel has enough clearance to hang my tool posts. I drilled holes in the shelf to rest the drill chuck and dead centers. I plan on pegboard in the opening for various other tooling needed to keep handy.

  10. #10
    Boolit Buddy 55fairlane's Avatar
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    Nice looking stand.....did your lathe level ok and hold that level well and not move?

    How do these grizzly lathe compare to my old south bend?

    Aaron

  11. #11
    Boolit Master cheese1566's Avatar
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    To be truthful, I haven’t tried any cuts at this time. I did have a friend help level it with his machinist level.

    I looked for a decent older American unit but they are scarce in this part of the Midwest. They cost more than what I paid for mine. I decided to go new and have all the parts included to start.

    There is always a big debate on old American vs Chinese.

    It suffices for my intentions. If I need serious build or beyond my capabilities, I give my business to the old timers with real equipment downtown. They have always helped me with questions.

  12. #12
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    I would get a cheap florescent light and put it on the bottom the the overhead rack.

    Or better yet this -> https://www.homedepot.com/p/Globe-El...RoC6MkQAvD_BwE

    that way you can be sure you get enough light when you need it

  13. #13
    Boolit Master cheese1566's Avatar
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    I had a Fluor over the old and a desk light like your link. I am thinking of maybe a newer LED shop style and maybe in a single tube.

  14. #14
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    that would be a great choice.
    The past 5 months I have been helping set a friends machine shop back up after he left "his company" cause turns out it wasn't his.
    I have total access now and the biggest issue I have is the lack of light above the machines.
    Especially the lathes (he has 2)
    I would get the desk light like I linked and just get a LED bulb. That way you can put light exactly on the area you are working on.

  15. #15
    Boolit Grand Master

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    Another handy addition, get one of the swing arm lighted magnifiers I had one on a magnetic base for years. gives light and when having to recatch a thread or fine workthe added magnification is a plus. When recatching a thread with it and a piece of clean white paper under neath the magnifier really helped see the tools relationship to the thread

  16. #16
    Boolit Buddy
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    Concrete in bag form is pretty cheap.We use it in quite a few machine base applications.Build a form(mould,haha)...cast them to be removable.Won't get into machine vibration because it's such a deep subject but,simple well thought ballast location can make a noticeable improvement.

  17. #17
    Boolit Grand Master
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    Variable speed is a dream come true for anyone doing machine work! I have put 220 3 phase motors on all my big shop tools. Using Allen Bradley phase converter speed controls, I take 220 single phase in and get 220 3 phase out to the motors. It gives me most of the HP rating on the motor. You loose a bit of HP with phantom phase technology, but I have never seen any problems with 1 to 2 HP motors. I think they make a 120 1ph in and 220 3ph out for those that do not have 220 readily available in their shops.


    Soft starts and stops are great. And I have not charged a belt speed on a lathe or milling machine in years! Just dial in the speed and go. A little chatter in brass? Just dial the RPM's down a bit. Threading? What a way to go! And you NEVER have to worry about burned out starter switches or start/run capacitors again.

    The price tag is not for the faint of heart, but....hey....you can't take it with you!

  18. #18
    Boolit Buddy McFred's Avatar
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    I agree with shopdog about the steel and concrete method. I made a 27" x 72" x 32" tall table that's about 750lb for about $250 in steel and 7 bags of redi-mix concrete; there's some scrap iron in there too to make sure it won't float away. I moved it into place with an engine hoist and some adjustable legs for leveling.

    Concrete's still damp:



    I set a little 700lb desktop mill on top of it (not finished mounting yet):

    Disregard the mess...

    I too use an electronic speed controller to get my 3-phase for the big lathe. It's very handy.

  19. #19
    Boolit Master Clark's Avatar
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    I like to get them up on wheels; lathe, mill, shaper, table saw, band saw.
    I want a wide footprint, so they can't fall over.

    Right now my 2000 pound bridgeport is too heavy for wheels, so it is stuck. But my last mill was only 600 pounds, and was on wheels.

  20. #20
    Boolit Master
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    On wheels, how level do they stay after moving around. I understand the concept, or need, but end results may vary.

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