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Thread: I just built a 3D printer.

  1. #41
    Boolit Master dikman's Avatar
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    Tazza, yes, I'm a bit perplexed as I would assume that anyone posting a design would only do so after they've proved it works. There's minimal shrinkage so that's not the issue.

    I don't know what you'd use for the sabot as the heat/friction generated in a barrel is going to melt a lot of plastics?

  2. #42
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    I'm not sure, dikman, paper patching works (which still confuses me a smidge!) so you could maybe paper patch a few? And possibly a Nylon filament would do OK in the barrel? (I'd think fire one, check bore, would be wise.)

  3. #43
    Boolit Bub
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    What a fascinating bunch of posts! Who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks? I'm 80 years old and want to look into this field!

  4. #44
    Boolit Master dikman's Avatar
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    I can guarantee it will give your brain cells a workout!

  5. #45
    Boolit Bub

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    i wanted to get a 3d printer of sorts but i haven't got one because i dont see the real practical use. I have a 2 axis CNC mill so i understand the programming but is the printed stuff actually usable? it seems too flimsy or rough from pictures i see?

  6. #46
    Boolit Man fralic76's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ianagos View Post
    i wanted to get a 3d printer of sorts but i haven't got one because i dont see the real practical use. I have a 2 axis CNC mill so i understand the programming but is the printed stuff actually usable? it seems too flimsy or rough from pictures i see?
    Everything that I print is usable. The prints that are rough are because of the settings used. I use the inlaws 3D printer.

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  7. #47
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    You can't quite duplicate the PCP-ish airguns that Lewis and Clark used exploring; But you can make quite a lot of things that are pretty darn sturdy. Printer settings can change sturdiness a lot (for example for a completely prototyping part I'll get it printed full of air or as I call it "frothy", don't need more filament than that, just something to verify fit or show what the unit will look like. If making a magazine loader you'd make it darn sturdy so that it doesn't break the first time you use it, of course. A custom ammo holder is easy to do (think of adding more rounds to your AR7) or a pocket organizer to keep your keys from ripping your pocket up or ...

  8. #48
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ianagos View Post
    i wanted to get a 3d printer of sorts but i haven't got one because i dont see the real practical use. I have a 2 axis CNC mill so i understand the programming but is the printed stuff actually usable? it seems too flimsy or rough from pictures i see?
    True, you wouldn't want to print a set of spanners with your home printer just yet, but there are plenty of applications where great strength isn't needed but being able to customise some things to your exact needs is handy. Just look at some of the weapons racking systems available - They seem to cost an arm and a leg for what is often little more that a pegboard backing and various shaped brackets. The brackets don't usually need great strength but you could design a system to custom fit your cabinet and your guns exactly.

    Here's something I've just knocked up over the Christmas period.
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  9. #49
    Boolit Master dikman's Avatar
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    Now that is very classy!
    Ianagos, I've found that PLA filament (the most commonly used) is surprisingly tough, but it all depends on how you design the object.

  10. #50
    Boolit Buddy
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    1066,

    Any idea on the cost of materials for your loading block?

    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by 1066 View Post
    Just designed and printed this loading tray for .45 - 70 this afternoon.


  11. #51
    Vendor Sponsor Big Tom's Avatar
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    Cost depends on the plastic you use, the quality (3D printer prints in layers, the smaller the layer, the more material, the more expensive) and the "infill" level (hollow part or xx% plastic on the inside).

    Filament goes from $15 to $60 for two lbs - I estimate that piece to be about 0.25 lbs.
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  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakharath View Post
    1066,

    Any idea on the cost of materials for your loading block?

    Thanks!
    The actual cost of normal PLA filament is quite reasonable - It varies in price and quality quite a bit and the special types, like those with a component of carbon fibre or metallic powder etc. are not so cheap.

    The .45-70 loading block was made with straight PLA and cost less than $20 for a 2 1/4 lb spool. You can control the density of the object you are printing so something like the loading block, where no real strength is needed is printed at around 20-30% solid.

    I recon I could get around 8-10 of the blocks out of a spool of filament so maybe $3 each.

    However, 3d printing is slow, one of those blocks takes 3-4 hours to print. It's not a problem if it's running in the background while you get on with something else but to actually make any money you would need several printers all chugging away day and night.

  13. #53
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    They have filaments now where (with the proper software add-ons) you can "print" a wood grain patterned object, the temp they deposit the material at determines its color (hotter = darker, more scorched.)

    For production, 3d printing is still quite slow, but for onesies it SHINES; If you want 100 of something, make a master or a mold / have a mold made from that master, and find a place that can cast (Maybe Urethane?) parts for you. (Many small railroad clubs, I'm told, have found someone able to do that for them - I've been told of a place in West Seattle.)

  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr_Sheesh View Post
    For production, 3d printing is still quite slow, but for onesies it SHINES
    I agree that it is best when you are making a custom part or something you expect to be sacrificed, rather than waste time ordering something or waste money on something you expect to lose. I print small toys and stuff for kids parties, rather than buy things, knowing small kids will break and lose things.

    Printing does take a while, it surely isn't fast. I've started doing everything in ABS plastic, because it's a hair stronger than PLA, and cheaper. I have the luxury of having a heated print bed, and it wasn't hard to make a wood and cardboard housing to put over the printer to prevent drafts and help retain heat for better consistency. The parts are definitely not as strong as injection molded, but often that isn't a problem.
    I wish I could afford a laser sintering rig, but that is a several thousand dollar toy that I can't justify the money or space for. Sintering is used for aerospace parts, typically titanium alloys. I man could print REAL stuff out of that.
    For now I'll stick with ABS.
    I used to use the printer several days a week, now I haven't fired it up in almost a month. The difference is I haven't NEEDED anything, and the entertainment factor and learning curve are done. When I need something, I will print it, and the printer is nearly paid for by the keychains I designed, printed and sold at work, so it's there when I need it.
    I dream of little ways to make it faster, and I could push hard to rebuild it, or build a new one from RepRap parts. If I do it will be an Ultimaker clone, but with larger print area and a direct drive filament feed rather than remote Bowden style. That remote filament feed approach is why the Ultimaker can print lightning fast, but print quality suffers. My future printer will use the Ulti's X-Y style, but have a small onboard filament feed on the print head. If I can make the dremel-inspired feed system work.
    Bulldogger

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