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Thread: We need a new category... Blunders and miscues?

  1. #21
    Boolit Master

    Hickok's Avatar
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    Long ago in my teenage days, and my first time out with a cap and ball .44 Colt, I learned the importance of proper fitting percussion caps and nipples/cones.

    Chain fire! A BIG cloud of smoke, and hand numbing recoil. The ball at the 6 o/clock position jammed into the loading lever. I don't know where the other balls went, but I don't think they followed the same direction as the one that went down the barrel!

    Loose caps, and the fire jumped across the back of the cylinder. I never believed the stories of chain fire due to flash jumping the balls at the front of the cylinder, but I do know that loose caps not fitting tightly on the nipples/cones can cause a chain fire.

    It sure makes a heck of a short range defense load!

    I now will gently file/dress my nipples/cones to fit percussion caps tightly on all my cap and ball revolvers.
    Maker of Silver Boolits for Werewolf hunting.

  2. #22
    Boolit Master

    DerekP Houston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by popper View Post
    I suppose the thread would be limited to gun stuff - else the 'forgot to put the drain plug in' and 'flying W' stuff will show up too. I did take out a chunk on floor with a 308W cast from 6". Never found any sign of boolit. Got some concrete splatters though. AR10 will slam fire.
    I didn't forget the drain plug....but I didn't know you were supposed to tighten it.... whoopsie!
    My feedback page if you feel inclined to add:
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    Thanks Yall!

  3. #23
    Boolit Master
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    I was home one drizzlday call. "Come get me! I shot my foot off !"
    Huh? Who are you?
    " It's Tommy! I shot my foot off !"
    Ok. I'll be there as soon as asI can. My wife will call the ER and let them know we are coming.
    Fifteen minutes later pulled up in Tommy's yard and rush into his house expecting a bloody stump. Tommy had the sneakers on and his right foot wrapped in a towel. Seems he was in the back yard shooting a BP Colt replica and cocking the revolver muzzle down next to his leg ,then raising the revolver and taking the shot. The last time he fired it while raising the revolver and boom!

    We got to the ER and the sheriff department had a representative there. The deputy looked at me and said " Tom, you didn't shoot him, did you?"
    I told him it was self inflicted. He just called me because it wouldbhave taken the ambulance service an hour to get him to the hospital.
    Tom
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  4. #24
    Boolit Master
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    I hate trying to post with this tablet. I always get screwed up sentences.

    Anyway the ball didn't get all the way through his foot. I saw the X-ray, and he put a crescent on the edge of his instep. He also made a necklace of that ball, complete with the bone fragment.


    Oh, the deputy just left without saying another word or filling out any paperwork. They knew me back then.
    Last edited by Tom W.; 09-07-2017 at 11:21 PM.
    Tom
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  5. #25
    Boolit Master
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    Unsafe with a gun and got handle wrong too.

    It was "Wrong Way” Corrigan.

    "look it up"

  6. #26
    A friend's wife told me how to make crème caramel by simmering an unopened can of condensed milk in water for five hours. The sugar content raises the boiling point above that of the water. But she made a bad mistake. She forgot to tell me not to go to sleep. It boiled dry and I was woken by the explosion, to find an oval saucepan and a oval pattern of crème caramel on the ceiling. What is more invisible traces were unremovable, and in the damp weather every winter I grew a crop of black mould. I ended up with a 1970s style expanded polystyrene tiled ceiling in the 1990s.

    One of my ancient childhood friends told me about an army comrade who fell into suicidal depression on the plains of India in the days before air-conditioning or modern communications. As a soldier, however, he knew that head wounds are occasionally survivable. Probably he had never seen how different they are at muzzle-contact range, in ways you probably don't want to think about. So he adopted the traditional stratagem of filling the barrel of his Lee-Enfield with water. At the last moment, however, he became reconciled with this world, and took the muzzle from his head. But in his a nervous state he tripped the trigger by mistake, and removed most of his ear.

    On waking up in hospital, he saw by his bedside the godlike figure of the regimental sergeant-major, a rank enlisted men achieve by a more reliable selection process than officers become generals. Suicide being a crime in those days, the patient asked whether he would go to jail, or be dismissed from the army. The sergeant-major assured him with utmost courtesy that there was no question of this for a foolish accident which had been its own punishment. He would remain in the service, and put under stoppages for five pounds ten shillings, to pay for the rifle he had destroyed.

    There is always good in a learning experience, especially if it happens to someone else. The remarkable thing here is just how little obvious harm was done. The victim’s eardrum wasn't burst, which is surprising. It was also a great grievance of his that he had to part with several months’ pay. The rifle, although undoubtedly damaged after firing several hundred extra grains of projectile, had not failed in any dramatic way. I take this to be because a sudden check by an obstruction is much worse than resistance from the start.

  7. #27
    Boolit Man Ateam's Avatar
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    I made this mistake this spring and have not told a single person.

    I was shooting some loads over my chrono and into wet newsprint to get an idea what was happening with some 250ftx out of my marlin 1895gbl 45-70. I find that the lowered position of the tailgate of my f150 is the perfect height to set my chrono. Well I shot two shots almost touching, and was about to shoot a third and thought better of it, if it went into the same grouping, it would likely destroy the other two captured slugs. While lowering the hammer, it slipped, and fell with enough oompf to fire the rifle which happened to be pointing at my tailgate. I got a nice 458 hole in one side and out the other, the holes are hidden when the gate is closed so it has escaped any ones notice so far. First accidental discharge ever.

    It did clean out the guts of the handle mechanism nicely though. I got off cheap for as bad as it could have gone.

  8. #28
    Boolit Master
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    Back in 1976, My good friend Warren bought a new 1911 and had "a super trigger job" done to it. We took it out to a rural area in North San Diego to test and had made a rest on the roof of my 1973 Pinto Station Wagon to do some accuracy testing. Turning to side to load it, Warren kindly and proudly having given me first chance at the deal, I drew the slide back and let it go. The slide slammed home, the ultra light hammer pull allowed the hammer to fall and my car door suddenly had a hole. Luckily, the case failed to extract and stove-piped, or I might have had a full auto event.
    There were a lot of gunsmiths in those days...not all good.
    _________________________________________________It's not that I can't spell: it is that I can't type.

  9. #29
    Boolit Master

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    Bullet holes in vehicles got me chuckling!

    My father-in-law once laid his .300 H&H across the hood of his nice shiny Plymouth Fury to get a better rest. Things apparently looked good through the scope. Nasty hole in the hood and out the fender.

    He is 92 now, an old WWII combat vet, and the cuss words are still traveling through the atmosphere into space!
    Maker of Silver Boolits for Werewolf hunting.

  10. #30
    Boolit Master

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    Crash, your story would make a great cartoon. Do we now know why they call you Crash? I am glad that you and the cat survived without injury.

    John

  11. #31
    Boolit Master


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    Viriginia John: Many a moon ago (1967) in a place far away a young Police Officer was driving a NYCPD patrol car to the scene of an incident where a brother officer was in trouble deep and had called for help via the Radio by signalling 10-13 and his location.

    You must understand that this radio signal had the highest priority of all. Any Police Officer in the NYCPD would immediately drop whatever he/she was doing to come to the aid of another cop as fast as he could.

    It was during the response to this call for help that an unfortunate accident gave me the nickname of Crash. My last name is Corrigan anyway. While accelerating down West 78th Street to the East I encountered a Taxi who had stopped and parked alongside another car which was parked on the curb legally. The cab was stopped illegally and was blocking traffic. My emergency lights and siren were fully activated and I was only two blocks away from an Officer who was in deep doo doo. However as I came up the left side of the taxi with light and siren lighting up the street and blaring so loud to make your head sore the driver decided to exit the vehicle via the front door on the left side.

    I was probably going about 50 MPH when I hit his partially opened door. I ended up removing that door and about half of the front fender and the left side of his bumper was also askew.

    Did I stop to render aid (if required) and document the occurance. NO. I kept on motoring and when we arrived at the scene I ended up getting my left collarbone broken, face all bruised up and a black eye to boot. Upon returning from the hosptal with my left arm in a sling I got to the police station to find the little taxi driver screaming at the Desk Lieutenant about the Police Car that almost killed him. He wanted action and he wanted it now.

    He got what he wanted. The Lieutenant asked me if his vehicle was blocking the street? Yes. Were my lights and siren in operation? Yes. Was I responding to a call of an emergency nature when the accident occured? Yes. Did I have the time to stop and issue a citation for failure to yield to an Emergency Vehicle to the Taxi Driver? No. The the Lieutenant suggested that I cite the taxi driver and prepare an accident report and remove the screaming driver out his sight.

    From that day on until I retired in 1984 I was called Crash Corrigan.
    Last edited by Crash_Corrigan; 09-09-2017 at 11:42 AM. Reason: spellng
    Pax Nobiscum Dan (Crash) Corrigan

    Currently casting, reloading and shooting: 223 Rem, 6.5x55 Sweede, 30 Carbine, 30-06, 30-30 WCF, 7.62x39, 327 Fed Mag, 303 Brit., 32WS, 7.92x57, 38 Spcl, 357 Mag, ,380 ACP. 9x19, 38-55 Win, 41 Mag, 44 Spcl., 44 Mag, 45 Colt, 45 ACP, 454 Casull, 457 RB for ROA and 50-90 Sharps.

  12. #32
    Boolit Master

    DerekP Houston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash_Corrigan View Post
    Viriginia John: Many a moon ago (1967) in a place far away a young Police Officer was driving a NYCPD patrol car to the scene of an incident where a brother officer was in trouble deep and had called for help via the Radio by signalling 10-13 and his location.

    You must understand that this radio signal had the highest priority of all. Any Police Officer in the NYCPD would immediately drop whatever he/she was doing to come to the aid of another cop as fast as he could.

    It was during the response to this call for help that an unfortunate accident gave me the nickname of Crash. My last name is Corrigan anyway. While accelerating down West 78th Street to the East I encountered a Taxi who had stopped and parked alongside another car which was parked on the curb legally. The cab was stopped illegally and was blocking traffic. My emergency lights and siren were fully activated and I was only two blocks away from an Officer who was in deep doo doo. However as I came up the left side of the taxi with light and siren lighting up the street and blaring so loud to make your head sore the driver decided to exit the vehicle via the front door on the left side.

    I was probably going about 50 MPH when I hit his partially opened door. I ended up removing that door and about half of the front fender and the left side of his bumper was also askew.

    Did I stop to render aid (if required) and document the occurance. NO. I kept on motoring and when we arrived at the scene I ended up getting my left collarbone broken, face all bruised up and a black eye to boot. Upon returning from the hosptal with my left arm in a sling I got to the police station to find the little taxi driver screaming at the Desk Lieutenant about the Police Car that almost killed him. He wanted action and he wanted it now.

    He got what he wanted. The Lieutenant asked me if his vehicle was blocking the street? Yes. Were my lights and siren in operation? Yes. Was I responding to a call of an emergency nature when the accident occured? Yes. Did I have the time to stop and issue a citation for failure to yield to an Emergency Vehicle to the Taxi Driver? No. The the Lieutenant suggested that I cite the taxi driver and prepare an accident report and remove the screaming driver out his sight.

    From that day on until I retired in 1984 I was called Crash Corrigan.
    Man that is an epic story, what a way to earn a nick name. Thanks for sharing =).
    My feedback page if you feel inclined to add:
    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...raight-Shooter

    Thanks Yall!

  13. #33
    Boolit Master





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    Glad you are not my tenant. Hiding damage.

    Glad I sold all our rental properties.

    Must be real proud to ask how to hide your damage.

    Name the new category won't say it here.
    Last edited by Geezer in NH; 09-09-2017 at 04:38 PM.

  14. #34
    Boolit Master woodbutcher's Avatar
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    Reminds me of an old saying"There you sit so spick and span,where you was when the fur hit the fan?"
    Good luck.have fun.Be safe.
    Leo
    People never lie so much as after a hunt,during a war,or before an election.
    Otto von Bismarck

  15. #35
    I knew someone in an administrative job on a very large air defence contract in the Middle East who used to be a flying instructor for the firm. One day he explained to a student how there was an interlock to stop you raising the undercarriage while the aircraft was on the ground. "If you pull the lever like this," he said, "nothing will happen." Then he pulled, and it did happen. It was found that a mechanic working on the aircraft had forgotten to reconnect the interlock after working on it, and it was only a basic jet trainer. So he got his lateral career move, and the name Wheels-up C_______ for evermore.

  16. #36
    Boolit Master

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    Walked into the local gunshop several years back and in another state and the proprietor had a huge bandage on his left hand. I said, "Homer, how did you hurt your hand?" Homer dourly informed me that some nutty guy had a stoppage with his cheap .25 Auto and brought it into the gunshop to get it unstopped and working again. Know-it-all gunshop proprietor proceeded to have his hand in front of the muzzle and put a .25 Auto round through his hand. No, I'm not going to tell any of my miscues. Big Boomer

  17. #37
    Boolit Master
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    Other than having a hammer slip from under my thumb and putting a nice hole in the ground, that is about it for me. But unfortunately, it has happened twice. Call me "butter thumbs"....

  18. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Hickok View Post
    Long ago in my teenage days, and my first time out with a cap and ball .44 Colt, I learned the importance of proper fitting percussion caps and nipples/cones.

    Chain fire! A BIG cloud of smoke, and hand numbing recoil. The ball at the 6 o/clock position jammed into the loading lever. I don't know where the other balls went, but I don't think they followed the same direction as the one that went down the barrel!

    Loose caps, and the fire jumped across the back of the cylinder. I never believed the stories of chain fire due to flash jumping the balls at the front of the cylinder, but I do know that loose caps not fitting tightly on the nipples/cones can cause a chain fire.

    It sure makes a heck of a short range defense load!

    I now will gently file/dress my nipples/cones to fit percussion caps tightly on all my cap and ball revolvers.
    In the UK people used to waterproof a cap with soft rubber tubing, in the days when it was called bicycle valve tubing. (They modernised the valves about fifty years ago.) If you do get caught with revolver nipples undersized for the only caps you have, this might prevent a chainfire and also stop them falling off. It can also be caused at the front end of the cylinder though. Tighter balls and grease certainly stopped it for me once.

    I have only had one case of what the British army terms a negligent discharge. Normally it is bad practice but not very dangerous to rest your finger on the trigger of a newly fired revolver, while you examine the chronograph. The double-action pull is too heavy to fire without intending to. Not if it is the Webley-Fosbery automatic revolver, though. It was within a few inch of my knee, and it was the eggcup-shaped manstopper bullet too. Of course I wouldn't have pointed it at any part of my person. I was foolish, not brain-dead. But it makes you think.

  19. #39
    Boolit Master
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    I had a friend with a defective percussion revolver that required the cylinder be turned by hand when shooting it. After turning the cylinder I proceeded to fire it with my hand next to the cylinder gap, tattooing my fingers with burning black powder. Have not repeated this for almost 40 years so I guess I learned something.

  20. #40
    Gas is almost perfectly elastic, so like the spring in your ballpoint pen which can catapult itself across the room, it can acquire far greater than bullet velocity.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check