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Thread: easiest to cast

  1. #1
    Boolit Master lablover's Avatar
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    easiest to cast

    Brass, Aluminum Steel? What do you find is the easiest mold to make the best looking boolits. I have several aluminum and am in the prowl for something new. I'd love to try Brass but fear I'd do more damage than good.

    Thanks Guys

    Joe

  2. #2
    Boolit Man
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    For me so far the steel Lyman. The Lee aluminum heat way too quick and slows me way down.
    Haven't tried brass yet.


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  3. #3
    Boolit Master
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    I started with aluminum because of the weight, I have stayed with aluminum because of the weight. I have no complaints. I have NOE, Accurate and Lee molds.

  4. #4
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    I find it easy to transition between iron, mehenite, and aluminum. They each need different cool times when warm.
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  5. #5
    Boolit Master
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    If you can use aluminum you can use brass. I really don't have a preference but they are all different. I will say the easiest to cast with are Saeco but aluminum and brass are the easiest to keep and are always ready to cast with and cast great bullets.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master hermans's Avatar
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    If the mold temp is correct, your alloy temp is correct, and your casting cadence for the specific mold is also correct, then they all produce perfect boolits. The only negative thing for me about brass molds, is the weight. On some of my 4 cavity and 6 cavity brass molds, they really wear me out after about 2 hours of casting.

  7. #7
    Boolit Master




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    I have one brass single cavity mold (copy of the Lyman 3118). You have to cast very hot and fast with that mold. The majority of my molds are aluminum, which cast just fine for me. I have iron molds and they work very well too. I like them all.
    You can miss fast & you can miss a lot, but only hits count.

  8. #8
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by MyFlatline View Post
    I started with aluminum because of the weight, I have stayed with aluminum because of the weight. I have no complaints. I have NOE, Accurate and Lee molds.
    THIS, EXACTLY!! And, as with any other mould, once you learn where the "sweet spot" is on pot temp you'll shuck out quality boolits just as fast as anybody else!
    "Only two things are infinite; the universe and human stupidity.......and I'm not sure about the universe..........."

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  9. #9
    Boolit Master reed1911's Avatar
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    I have all different types and iron and alum. are my top preferences. Brass is way to heavy and you do have to cast HOT. I only use brass when I have to it does well on softer alloys in my opionon (20:1, 30:1, etc). Iron will outlast alum. but if you are not hard on your tools, you likely never wear out an alum. mold.
    Ron Reed
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  10. #10
    Boolit Master
    runfiverun's Avatar
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    I have all three, some of them are good to go at room temp.
    some of them I open and and all the bullets fall out.
    some of them I have to smack while holding the mold sideways.
    I got no preference beyond boolit design.
    it's all an educated guess,,,, till the trigger is pulled.

    this opinion brought to you by mister low-tech solution..

  11. #11
    Boolit Master
    dragon813gt's Avatar
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    easiest to cast

    Quote Originally Posted by runfiverun View Post
    I have all three, some of them are good to go at room temp.
    some of them I open and and all the bullets fall out.
    some of them I have to smack while holding the mold sideways.
    I got no preference beyond boolit design.
    Same here except I don't have any steel molds. Not an option for me in the rust belt. The answer to the OP's question is it's personal preference.

  12. #12
    Boolit Master Harter66's Avatar
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    Iron is hard with small cavities in in big blocks . A 4 cavity Lyman in 25 cal at 90 gr is work . 5C 22-55 in Aluminum is fast and easy a 5C aluminum 454424 will over heat and make you stop for a slug of water about every 15-18 pours .
    I have a single brass mould and good grief what a pita to get to pour the first good keepers . Now that I finally have it patina'd or whatever it's probably one of the slickest moulds I own .

    If you're a bull and you don't mind the extra weight iron 1,2 and 3C moulds in blocks proportion to the cavities . Brass is nice but it's heavy also .
    With iron or brass a 1000 bullet 4 hr run will make you happy for the reheat breaks .
    Running Aluminum moulds I've run them long enough to be caught of guard by a low pot .

    I really can't say that any particular mould mat'l is better but rather that each has it's virtues and faults . For all the fault of aluminum the weight is a huge virtue .
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  13. #13
    Boolit Bub



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    I use my classic molds most, usually steel. Aluminum seems to be okay, but I feel like Im messing with the heat more and the mold temp seems finicky (could just be me, though) I just bought my 1st brass mold, and I love it, when it warms up. But, I tire quickly, those things are heavy, man. I have one bronze, I believe. Havent used it because it's about the 4th of 4 too many 358/360 wadcutter molds. let's face it though, bullet design trumps mold material. You just have to practice and learn your molds and find the sweet temp. As everyone has already said more than once.
    -Mike

  14. #14
    Boolit Bub

    BHill's Avatar
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    I have steel and aluminum molds but I have just recently started using the steel. I have some older Ideal molds and the bullets just flow out of them.

  15. #15
    Boolit Master
    rintinglen's Avatar
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    I have found that it easiest to cast good boolilts with an Iron or other iron alloy mold, but brass, once up to temperature is a very close second.
    _________________________________________________It's not that I can't spell: it is that I can't type.

  16. #16
    Boolit Master Oklahoma Rebel's Avatar
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    I only have aluminum but am about to buy my first steel mold, it will be a accurate 3 cavity .366 9.3mm 286gr mold in the larger size block. im sure it wont be light but with 3 big holes drilled in it I don't think it will be too bad. I am excited to get it and try steel out!
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  17. #17
    Boolit Master

    gwpercle's Avatar
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    Steel is the easiest for a beginner. They can take a lot of neglect. I never lubed my Lyman moulds and once broken in don't seem to need a lot of TLC or babying . Aluminum requires some TLC and can be temperamental . Decades of using Lee moulds and this site has taught me the ins and outs of aluminum moulds. I was blown away with my first aluminum NOE mould but you still have to baby and lube them to avoid problems like galling the sprue cutter and mould block top. Aluminum is very soft and easily damaged
    Any smears on a steel mould can be scrubbed off with steel wool or scraped off with a razor with no damage to blocks.
    Therefore I'm going to say steel moulds are easiest for a beginner.
    I've never tried brass but I know brass is a soft metal also and would expect it to require some TLC in use.
    Steel makes a good looking bullet, the old Lee moulds did not but the new Lee moulds look much better. The NOE moulds make a great looking bullet. I am sure it's how the block cavities are cut, attention to detail and design that make the difference. NOE's are well designed and look great . Lyman has discontinued so many moulds, when I discovered they were no longer going to make any 41 magnum moulds I started searching ebay for used ones. Those used Lymans were priced way too high. I found 1 new mould made by Lee and then found NOE , they make 9 different 41 magnum moulds , even a Elmer Keith Signature Mould that is a duplicate of his original SWC design the Lyman no longer carries. Best of all I can get them in 3 cavity moulds, my favorite size.
    Gary
    Last edited by gwpercle; 09-10-2017 at 10:02 AM.
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  18. #18
    Boolit Master
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    A mold that works well is a good mold ,but I'd go with aluminium as its easier on the wrists.

  19. #19
    Boolit Master

    DerekP Houston's Avatar
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    I love my brass molds, but the hg 50 steel is my favorite mold and easiest to cast with. Drops keepers almost every time with little to no effort on my part.
    My feedback page if you feel inclined to add:
    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...raight-Shooter

    Thanks Yall!

  20. #20
    Boolit Master lablover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gwpercle View Post
    Steel is the easiest for a beginner. They can take a lot of neglect. I never lubed my Lyman moulds and once broken in don't seem to need a lot of TLC or babying . Aluminum requires some TLC and can be temperamental . Decades of using Lee moulds and this site has taught me the ins and outs of aluminum moulds. I was blown away with my first aluminum NOE mould but you still have to baby and lube them to avoid problems like galling the sprue cutter and mould block top. Aluminum is very soft and easily damaged
    Any smears on a steel mould can be scrubbed off with steel wool or scraped off with a razor with no damage to blocks.
    Therefore I'm going to say steel moulds are easiest for a beginner.
    I've never tried brass but I know brass is a soft metal also and would expect it to require some TLC in use.
    Steel makes a good looking bullet, the old Lee moulds did not but the new Lee moulds look much better. The NOE moulds make a great looking bullet. I am sure it's how the block cavities are cut, attention to detail and design that make the difference. NOE's are well designed and look great . Lyman has discontinued so many moulds, when I discovered they were no longer going to make any 41 magnum moulds I started searching ebay for used ones. Those used Lymans were priced way too high. I found 1 new mould made by Lee and then found NOE , they make 9 different 41 magnum moulds , even a Elmer Keith Signature Mould that is a duplicate of his original SWC design the Lyman no longer carries. Best of all I can get them in 3 cavity moulds, my favorite size.
    Gary
    I think you nailed it Gary. I have a Noe mold and right now it's at Al's shop again because I didn't baby it enough or lube. My alignment pins started to gouge the alignment holes in the other block. Not sure how it started but nevertheless it happened. I'm hoping Al can fix it up and make it right for me. I will say it cast awesome Boolits for sure until my pin issue. I think I'm gonna seek out a 160 gr .452 SWC design in steel. I think Accurate makes a good looking 160 gr. Maybe after more experience I'll move to brass.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check