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Thread: Everything Lost to Hurricane Harvey

  1. #1
    Boolit Master

    nicholst55's Avatar
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    Everything Lost to Hurricane Harvey

    Not everything - just everything reloading and gun and tool related. We have old friends in Houston who offered to store everything that I couldn't ship when I took a job in Korea last winter. I'm talking all of my reloading gear - presses, lube/sizers, powder measures, case trimmers, around 40 sets of dies, molds, melting pots, brass, ammo; a relatively small quantity of gun parts, holsters, etc. I'm running a spreadhseet to itemize everything that I can remember that was in this group of stuff, and I expect the current replacement cost to come out near $10K.

    I fully realize that my loss is petty compared to people who literally lost everything - house, cars, and all their belongings, let alone those who lost family members. Don't misnderstand. I am most certainly not equating my loss with theirs!

    The friends that we left my stuff with are in their 70s, so I certainly don't expect them to try to salvage any of my stuff. And, that's all it is, is stuff. Of course, they do not have flood insurance. I truly wish that I was able to come assist them in their recovery efforts, but alas, that is simply not in the cards.

    Once we return to the States, I can begin replacing some of my reloading equipment. I had two Dillon 550s, a Rockchucker, a Lyman T-Mag, a Lyman 4500 and a Saeco lube/sizer, and a whole bunch of additional stuff - been reloading since 1976, and have accumulated a bunch! I expect to be a minimalist as far as reloading gear goes, next time around.

    Okay, I'm done feeling sorry for myself. I just wanted to vent, mostly.
    'I have a feeling we're not in Kansas any more, Toto!' Dorothy, in The Wizard of Oz.

  2. #2
    Boolit Master

    Beagle333's Avatar
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    A lot of it could possibly be salvaged if you had somebody near there who could get it out, dry it off and dunk it in oil, and box it back up til you get back and you can clean/degrease it.
    But I'm in Alabama. Perhaps there's somebody closer who might could help.
    Colt 1860, it just feels right.

  3. #3
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beagle333 View Post
    A lot of it could possibly be salvaged if you had somebody near there who could get it out, dry it off and dunk it in oil, and box it back up til you get back and you can clean/degrease it.
    But I'm in Alabama. Perhaps there's somebody closer who might could help.
    Yeah, not even sure when my friends will be allowed to return home. They were initially told it would be September 20. Their son-in-law may be able to do something, depending on a variety of things. I'm hopeful, but at the same time I'm not going to hold my breath.
    'I have a feeling we're not in Kansas any more, Toto!' Dorothy, in The Wizard of Oz.

  4. #4
    Boolit Master tazman's Avatar
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    Getting submerged in water doesn't automatically ruin reloading equipment. Corrosion and rust take time.
    I had reloading stuff get under water in my basement for days a number of years ago. I didn't find the stuff for a couple of years because I wasn't reloading during that period of my life.
    The "stuff" included presses, molds, and Lee lead pots. I even had ammunition in old army ammunition cans with seals on the lids.
    When I found it, some of it still had water in the containers(old plastic totes). I took it out, cleaned it, dried it, and soaked it in penetrating oil. Almost all of it was saved. I am still using quite a bit of it including the Lee lead pots. The ammunition was still perfect and dry.
    Often reloading equipment has a coating of grease or oil on it when used and this helps protect the stuff from temporary immersion in water.

  5. #5
    Boolit Man
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    That sucks, If I were closer, I would save it for you. Most of it would be brought back to life.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master jmorris's Avatar
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    You mean like gone, to the gulf or just got wet?

  7. #7
    Boolit Master



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    I know it's too late to tell you now, but those plastic 55g drums that have the liquid-tight clamp on tops are great for long term storage of things in areas where it might get wet.
    When you fill out your income tax forms at the end of the year, look and see how much money you have given the
    government throughout the year. Then, take a moment to ponder -- has the government done $X worth of
    stuff FOR you or TO you this year? I tend to believe the latter...

    Si vis pacem, para bellum -- If you want peace, prepare for war

    "Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. Moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue." -- Barry Goldwater

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  8. #8
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    I can tell you that the 550s aren't trashed. Dillion will make them right again.

  9. #9
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by NavyVet1959 View Post
    I know it's too late to tell you now, but those plastic 55g drums that have the liquid-tight clamp on tops are great for long term storage of things in areas where it might get wet.
    So are basic ammo cans. Can store lots of dies in a 50cal can. And they make larger ones that would hold presses. Definitely not cheap. But for the OP the $10k investment would have been protected.

    Not trying to make light of the situation. Sorry to hear that you might lose all your tools. No one wants to go through that. And hindsight is always 20/20. Hopefully others in wet areas will heed the warning and protect their investment in case of a future catastrophy.

  10. #10
    Boolit Master



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    Quote Originally Posted by dragon813gt View Post
    So are basic ammo cans. Can store lots of dies in a 50cal can. And they make larger ones that would hold presses. Definitely not cheap. But for the OP the $10k investment would have been protected.

    Not trying to make light of the situation. Sorry to hear that you might lose all your tools. No one wants to go through that. And hindsight is always 20/20. Hopefully others in wet areas will heed the warning and protect their investment in case of a future catastrophy.
    Those 55g drums are pretty cheap though. And we've used the closed top ones for flotation under docks and house boats for years without a problem, so they really last.
    When you fill out your income tax forms at the end of the year, look and see how much money you have given the
    government throughout the year. Then, take a moment to ponder -- has the government done $X worth of
    stuff FOR you or TO you this year? I tend to believe the latter...

    Si vis pacem, para bellum -- If you want peace, prepare for war

    "Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. Moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue." -- Barry Goldwater

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  11. #11
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by NavyVet1959 View Post
    Those 55g drums are pretty cheap though. And we've used the closed top ones for flotation under docks and house boats for years without a problem, so they really last.
    No doubt. But I'm not sure I'd want my tools to float away

    My tools certainly aren't protected from a flood at the moment. But it's not a real concern of mine. Except for the few items I keep in my basement. So I should follow my own advice and store them properly

  12. #12
    Boolit Master

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    Sorry to hear this. Hopefully some member close to the area will step up to help out. I would if I was closer. Good Luck!

  13. #13
    Boolit Master
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    I expect the current replacement cost to come out near $10K.
    nichols - you have a valid IRS Casualty Loss that is deductible on your income tax return ... I went through the same water damage to my basement including 2 safes of firearms and all the stuff in my reloading room from Super Storm Sandy breaking a basement window and depositing 36 inches of sugar sand and salt water in the basement. I carry firearms insurance but FEMA does not insure personal property in a basement but yes if one the 1st or higher floors of the house.
    Regards
    John

  14. #14
    Boolit Master
    DerekP Houston's Avatar
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    Once they can get access to the house again shoot me a message, if be happy to at least pick up the presses and drop them in some oil to prevent and worse corrosion. I'm not 100% on repairing gear but I can help dry it out at least and assess the damage.
    My feedback page if you feel inclined to add:
    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...raight-Shooter

    Thanks Yall!

  15. #15
    Boolit Master



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    Quote Originally Posted by dragon813gt View Post
    No doubt. But I'm not sure I'd want my tools to float away

    My tools certainly aren't protected from a flood at the moment. But it's not a real concern of mine. Except for the few items I keep in my basement. So I should follow my own advice and store them properly
    As far as I've been able to tell, most of the people affected by the flood have not been dealing with strong rushing waters, just rising water. Having the 55g drums in a garage would mean that they would float in the garage and not leave. Having the 55g drum in the attic would mean that they would probably even stay above the water line in the deepest places. From what I've been able to gather, about 15-20% of the Houston area received any floodwaters entering their houses. Of course, that doesn't make the news. What makes the news is those people who were living by a major flood control waterway who learned (yet again) that that waterway does in fact flood during major rain events like hurricanes and tropical storms.
    When you fill out your income tax forms at the end of the year, look and see how much money you have given the
    government throughout the year. Then, take a moment to ponder -- has the government done $X worth of
    stuff FOR you or TO you this year? I tend to believe the latter...

    Si vis pacem, para bellum -- If you want peace, prepare for war

    "Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. Moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue." -- Barry Goldwater

    Tag Line


  16. #16
    Boolit Master

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    After the fact all you can do is hope it gets cleaned up or at least sprayed down with oil. We had tooling we used very little that was sprayed down with 80-90w gear oil and stored. The choice of this oil was its viscosity it clinged and stayed on surfaces better than lighter oils. A heavy coat of this or even lighter oils after the equipment dries sprayed liberally over all surfaces and restored, would extend the time for cleaning and restoring greatly. Possibly to a few years. once dry spray down and store in ammo cans what can be. presses and larger items in a plastic bag with the ends sealed tightly. This holds the oils and fumes of it in the bag fumes displace the air and the bags sealed end reduces new from entering. A good way is tie off opening fold over tie off again and then one more fold and tie off. put one press in a garbage bag and seal off after oiling it down. dies can be sprayed down and put back in the boxes and into 50 cal ammo cans or storage containers. Right now they need the oil and lack of air. Once this protection is done then actual cleaning can take place much later

  17. #17
    Boolit Master
    mdi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DerekP Houston View Post
    Once they can get access to the house again shoot me a message, if be happy to at least pick up the presses and drop them in some oil to prevent and worse corrosion. I'm not 100% on repairing gear but I can help dry it out at least and assess the damage.
    God bless you Derek...
    My Anchor is holding fast!

  18. #18
    Boolit Master


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    Thank you for your service. I spent 9 months at Yongsan Garrison in 1972. Hq, Hqs Co., EUSA.
    Claim the loss, deduct the salvage value and restore or sell as you see fit. Hope someone close to the scene can help in the meantime.
    Micah 6:8
    He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the LORD require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?

    "I don't have hobbies - I'm developing a robust post-apocalyptic skill set"
    I may be discharged and retired but I'm sure I did not renounce the oath that I solemnly swore!

  19. #19
    Boolit Master
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    Everything Lost to Hurricane Harvey

    Quote Originally Posted by NavyVet1959 View Post
    As far as I've been able to tell, most of the people affected by the flood have not been dealing with strong rushing waters, just rising water. Having the 55g drums in a garage would mean that they would float in the garage and not leave. Having the 55g drum in the attic would mean that they would probably even stay above the water line in the deepest places.
    I always forget that there are no basements in Texas. After all if The Alamo doesn't have one why should every other house
    I was thinking that if the water rose enough they would start pushing on the ceiling above them. Hydraulic pressure is pretty amazing and the drums could end up on the second floor.

    That's a mighty fine offer from Derek and I would take him up on it. Dry them out and soak them in oil. If anything is really rusted Evaporust will neutralize it. That stuff works wonders.

  20. #20
    Boolit Master
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    This might be helpful


    “Machinist Workshop Magazine” did a test on penetrating oils.
    the torque required to loosen them;
    Nothing: 516 lbs
    WD-40: 238 lbs;
    PB Blaster: 214 lbs;
    Liquid Wrench: 127 lbs,
    Kano Kroil: 106 lbs
    (ATF)/Acetone mix (50/50): 50 lbs.

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BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
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GC Gas Check