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Thread: AP Rounds. How to place cores?

  1. #21
    Boolit Master
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    The ATF has a pretty liberal interpretation of what they consider AP. As previously mentioned the way the law is written the AP applies only to handgun rounds. To the layman that means 9mm, 45, and 40, or even 25 ACP.

    However to the ATF they apply the rule to anything which may be considered a pistol Which now includes AR-15s, AR-10, Encore pistols. Unfortunately the Encore pistols do have some remarkably absurd chamberings. The same caliber bullet used in a .308 Win may also be used in a 300Blk Pistol, or a 300 RUM. Because of that its illegal to manufacture any AP rounds in .308 Caliber. This has caught more then a few manufacturers by surprise and forced them to discontinue their lines of Brass Solids made primary for Dangerous Game.

    Just a word of caution here, but it is a very interesting educational discussion.

  2. #22
    Boolit Master



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    What about Barnes banded solid copper?

  3. #23
    Boolit Master



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    Quote Originally Posted by Mauser 98K View Post
    i always used my standard die i made and placed an inconel rod from a spark plug in the ejector hole against the ejector pin and swaged the bullet around the inconel piece and then sharpened it.. i can do that with my dies, not sure about commercial ones.. another way to do it would be to make a penetrator the shape of a smaller bullet, swage a core with a hollow in it where the penetrator will drop into it, then drop the core with penetrator into the jacket and point form it. if done correctly with a pure lead the lead will flow around the penetrator like the old steel core bullets..these bullets will be a lot lighter than a normal bullet at a lot higher speed and will knock the hell out of armor plate.. there are a few way of doing AP.. i make my own dies so not to worried about experimenting with them..
    Just curious, what is the dimension of a spark plug core?

  4. #24
    it is rather small.. less than 1/8in diameter and under 3/4 inch long.. been a while since i took one apart so im not really sure..

  5. #25
    Boolit Master
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    Barnes had to discontinue almost all of their banded solid line. There's only a few left that you can purchase all in larger calibers.

  6. #26
    Boolit Master BlackoutBuilder's Avatar
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    I have been looking all over the world for tungsten carbide rods that would be suitable for a core. I found a company in China will make them for me they would be 4.75 mm in diameter and 8 mm in length I should be able to make a core out of those. The problem is, they are still $.80 each so 500 of those shipped cost me $433 and I Do not have that kind of money. Unfortunately it's a minimum order of 500. So, I don't know what I'm going to do, apparently there's no place in the United States that works with tungsten carbide.
    NFA = Not Freaking American

    It would be less disrespectful to burn the flag than to put a thin blue line through the middle of it.

  7. #27
    Boolit Master BlackoutBuilder's Avatar
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    Then theres the whole "shall not be infringed" part of the law.
    NFA = Not Freaking American

    It would be less disrespectful to burn the flag than to put a thin blue line through the middle of it.

  8. #28
    Boolit Master reed1911's Avatar
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    I don't know why you think no one in the US has it. A quick look in Google and I see about 10 companies that handle it in various sizes.
    Just a quick look at my go to for everything McMaster Carr
    https://www.mcmaster.com/#tungsten-alloys/=19739zm
    Ron Reed
    Oklahoma City, OK
    info@reedsammo.com

  9. #29
    Boolit Master BlackoutBuilder's Avatar
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    Thanks 1911. What's the best way to cut them to consistent lengths?
    NFA = Not Freaking American

    It would be less disrespectful to burn the flag than to put a thin blue line through the middle of it.

  10. #30
    Boolit Master
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    GONRA goes nuts on this stuff.
    Pretty sure when ya'll refer to "tungsten" you really mean "tungsten CARBIDE"?

    >>> Yeah - its important - not just some GONRA niggling! <<<

    There are all sorts of technical gun nut articles out there that "just slopply ignore the difference".
    "Homogeneous tungsten metal alloys" AND
    "cemented tungsten carbides" (binder is usually Cobalt metal)
    are BOTH used for military AP cores!

    They are WAAAAAAAY different!

  11. #31
    Boolit Master reed1911's Avatar
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    Depending on which size you need, with the smaller size rod it is easier to just break them. Drill a hole the same size plus a few thou. and drop the rod in and snap it. Not terribly consistent, but it is quick. The larger ones you'll need to use a diamond tool or diamond blade. I would use the thinnest blade you can depending on what type of saw you have. High speed, lots of cutting oil and a slow advance. If you have a lathe just use a collet holder and diamond tip cutoff tool.

    Yes this is all in ref. to tungsten carbide. Straight tungsten is rather soft, harder than steel, but not a pain to cut. Tungsten carrbide is very hard. Cemented tungsten carbide is used all over th place, most lathe tools are cemented carbide. It is much easier to make any shape and be very consistent with it.
    Ron Reed
    Oklahoma City, OK
    info@reedsammo.com

  12. #32
    Boolit Master tiger762's Avatar
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    Everyone wants things dirt cheap.

    Quote Originally Posted by reed1911 View Post
    I don't know why you think no one in the US has it. A quick look in Google and I see about 10 companies that handle it in various sizes.
    Just a quick look at my go to for everything McMaster Carr
    https://www.mcmaster.com/#tungsten-alloys/=19739zm

  13. #33
    Boolit Master BlackoutBuilder's Avatar
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    It's not that I was after anything cheap, it's that I'm totally new to tungsten carbide is a material as a whole. I prefer to find United States companies and it further, Michigan companies, and if possible local people. I did look, but I had a bit of trouble trying to find anything in the United States. I appreciate that link however.
    NFA = Not Freaking American

    It would be less disrespectful to burn the flag than to put a thin blue line through the middle of it.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check