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View Poll Results: Which Mold For 38 Snubnose (see post one for details)

Voters
65. You may not vote on this poll
  • Lee 358-125

    15 23.08%
  • NOE 360-172 SWC

    2 3.08%
  • NOE 360-172 SWC HP

    5 7.69%
  • NOE 360-180 WFN GC

    9 13.85%
  • Lee 358 200 RNFP GC

    2 3.08%
  • Buy Factory SD Ammo

    15 23.08%
  • Get a different mold

    17 26.15%
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Results 41 to 60 of 63

Thread: Snubnose Bullet Options

  1. #41
    Boolit Master
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    I say carry what you train with,I do because I can not afford that kind of expense with factory and I hate suprises !
    Last edited by Edward; 08-03-2017 at 07:02 PM.

  2. #42
    Boolit Master
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    I opted for "Carry Factory SD Loads", and my choice of loads would be one of the major-maker FBI-touted 38 Special +P LSWC/HP. This load is easily reloaded for practice ammo with affordable components--small powder weights, 158 grain lead SWC bullets, and SP primers. Carry factory stuff, crank it off yearly and swap in fresh ammo--reload the empties and add that to your practice supply.
    I don't paint bullets. I like Black Rifle Coffee. Sacred cows are always fair game. California is to the United States what Syria is to Russia and North Korea is to China/South Korea/Japan--a Hermit Kingdom detached from the real world and led by delusional maniacs, an economic and social basket case sustained by "foreign" aid so as to not lose military bases.

  3. #43
    Boolit Master
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    I am of the mind that in a snubbie .38, a full wadcutter would be the best cast boolit to have chambered and any good 150ish - 160ish semi-wadcutter as re-load fodder. Wadcutters can be clumsy to chamber and a semi-wadcutters can help out fingers that stumble when hurried.

  4. #44
    Boolit Master
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    A link to testing done with 2" bbl's & 4" bbl's/38spl & 357 factory ammo.
    http://www.luckygunner.com/labs/revo...cs-test/#38spl
    That's a great link. It not only shows the difference in how various bullet types perform, it also shows how quickly performance falls off as barrel lengths and bullet speed diminishes.

    I am curious as to the hardness of the factory lead used in these tests. I suspect a softer lead boolit would do somewhat better than the ones shown.

  5. #45
    Boolit Master
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    In the ultra lite revolvers 342 Smith and Taurus View (9oz.) This new ARX works well.


    Firearms, cartridges and component design are rapidly and dramatically changing, although much of this change may not be visually obvious. Alloy steel or stainless steel may look the same when blackened, and a special steel alloy and heat treatment used to fabricate a super tough revolver cylinder may look the same as any other revolver. However, in the case of Ruger's new ARX ammunition, it would be difficult to miss the uniqueness of the product.



    The center of the new Ruger ARX ammunition's universe is its uniquely fluted, copper and polymer composite bullet. The bullet's light weight, coupled with high velocity, results in high forward and lateral energy transfer for increased lethality. Reduced bullet weight results in reduced recoil which makes it easier to remain on target when multiple shots are fired. The bullet's low mass contributes to controlled penetration even though ARX ammo is not frangible.



    Ruger ARX® Published Specifications

    Caliber Bullet Weight
    Grains Muzzle Velocity
    fps Muzzle Energy
    Ft. Lbs. Availability
    380 Auto ARX 56 1315 215 Now
    9mm Luger ARX 74 1540 385 Soon
    40 S&W ARX 107 1320 414 Soon
    45 Auto ARX 118 1350 461 Now

    The ARX bullet was designed by PolyCase Ammunition and manufactured through a precision tolerance injection molding process. The composite that forms the bullet is made from a proprietary copper alloy and high tensile strength nylon. All components and ammunition are made in the U.S.. The company is located in Savannah, Georgia.

    What a lethal bullet must accomplish in self defense...

    A bullet can stop an attacker only by damaging or destroying the central nervous system or by causing profuse blood loss. To that end, a bullet penetrates and destroys tissue through compression and forms a permanent wound channel. The transfer of kinetic energy stretches tissue to form a temporary wound channel. That kinetic energy also can cause fragmentation; driving bullet and bone fragments outward causing secondary damage to tissue and blood vessels.

    The shape of the ARX flutes cause exceptional amounts of hydraulic displacement, effectively transferring energy laterally as well as forward; a small but very intense high pressure hydraulic pump pushing outward from a wound channel. Wherever the fluid is driven, it does further damage to internal organs, the nervous system, muscle tissue and blood vessels; hydrostatic shock. No, not the type that theorizes a shot in the finger will make a toe explode and/or innards turned to jelly. Rather it is the type that has been part of the lethal bullet conversation since World War II, appeared in the April 1942 issue of Popular Mechanics as authored by California gunsmith Ralph Waldo Miller, and is based upon the same principles that allow a pressure washer to clean a boat or water jet machines to cut patterns in thick steel plate.

    Or we can just shut up and show the results...

    A Ruger LCP in 380 Auto with 2.75" barrel and an SR1911 in 45 Auto with a 5" barrel were selected for the live fire checkout. They are each typical within their respective applications.



    With firearms and ammunition in hand, we set out to get a better understanding of Ruger's ARX performance, while trying to not indulge and/or engage the easily entertained with slow motion images of undulating ballistic gel. For the sake of comparison, we ran two other common types of ammunition along side the Ruger ARX as noted on the tables that follow.



    Shots were recorded on a freshly calibrated chronograph. With the exception of the Ruger ARX ammo where we had no prior experience, the other ammo clocked typical fps.


    Caliber
    Ammunition
    Bullet
    Weight
    Grains Rated
    MV FPS Rated
    ME Ft. Lbs Recorded
    MV FPS
    2.75" Bbl Calculated
    ME Ft. Lbs
    380 Auto PMC Bronze FMJ 90 961 185 861 148
    380 Auto Remington Golden Saber JHP 102 940 200 803 146
    380 Auto Ruger ARX Self Defense 56 1315 215 1275 202
    Caliber
    Ammunition
    Bullet
    Weight
    Grains Rated
    MV FPS Rated
    ME Ft. Lbs Recorded
    MV FPS
    5.00" Bbl Calculated
    ME Ft. Lbs
    45 Auto Remington UMC FMJ 230 835 356 830 352
    45 Auto Remington Ultimate Defense 230 875 391 864 381
    45 Auto Ruger ARX Self Defense 118 1350 461 1352 479
    -

    Non-gratuitous, non-alcoholic Gel-O-Shots...

    Most of the time, we run this part of ammo assessment by shooting into a couple of 16x6x6 ballistic gel blocks, recording depth of penetration, noting bullet track through the medium, then measuring and weighing the recovered slug. Here we had an instance where key features are hydraulic displacement and lateral energy transfer, so we took an analog approach to measurement.





    With two blocks back to back for a total of 32", they were supported on narrow pieces of wood to minimize the amount of influence the supporting boards would have on the gel. Lengths of string were looped around the blocks, secured with a slip knot and indexed at the knot with a black marker. Expansion of the gel block from a bullet's lateral force or hydraulic displacement pulled the string through the slip knot and measurement was taken as illustrated by the red arrows in the picture above. Kite string was selected because it didn't cut into the gel block on expansion and because its low mass offered little resistance and gained virtually no momentum to expand beyond gel movement.


    Caliber
    Ammunition
    Start
    Bullet Wt
    Grains End
    Bullet Wt
    Grains End
    Bullet
    Diameter " Penetration
    Inches 2" Penetration
    Lateral
    Expansion 6" Penetration
    Lateral
    Expansion
    380 Auto PMC Bronze FMJ 90.0 89.6 0.356 20.5 0.0 0.0
    380 Auto Remington Golden Saber JHP 102.0 99.3 0.570 11.0 0.0 0.0
    380 Auto Ruger ARX Self Defense 56.0 56.0 0.355 11.5 0.5 0.0
    Caliber
    Ammunition
    Start
    Bullet Wt
    Grains Recovered
    Bullet Wt
    Grains End
    Bullet
    Diameter " Penetration
    Inches 2" Penetration
    Lateral
    Expansion 6" Penetration
    Lateral
    Expansion
    45 Auto Remington UMC FMJ 230.0 229.9 0.451 32.0+ 0.0 0.0
    45 Auto Remington Ultimate Defense 230.0 230.0 0.740 14.5 0.6 0.2
    45 Auto Ruger ARX Self Defense 118.0 113.4 0.451 15.5 1.7 0.8

    -All shots into gel were from a distance of 10 feet


    The 380 ARX did indeed demonstrate hydraulic displacement and lateral energy transfer to a measureable degree. The bullet tracked straight and it did leave a permanent wound channel at least as large as the expanded Golden Saber.



    Ball ammo penetrated well beyond the others as it did not expand to increase its frontal area for increased drag. It also demonstrated no measureable signs of lateral energy transfer. Unfortunately, there are many autoloaders that require the rounded ogive of ball ammo to feed properly, reliably. Fortunately, the ARX bullet has a very similar contour and feeds as slick as ball ammo, so owners of these types of autoloaders are no longer stuck with low shock ball ammo as a sole choice.

    Snappy recoil can make micro autoloaders chambered for the 380 Auto difficult to shoot. The lighter ARX bullet lessoned the LCP's recoil to a noticeable degree, making it easier to shoot with accuracy. The 380 Auto serves a very valid role in self defense, unfortunately, there are few good factory loads within that context. Many have impressive names, but either don't penetrate or don't expand when fired from short barrel guns. The Ruger ARX has no such problems.

    The 45 Auto match up kept me out shooting a lot longer than anticipated in an effort to better understand the difference between these two types of approaches to bullet design. If anything, the larger bore comparison amplified the differences between the two.



    Over the years, I've migrated to Golden Saber bullets in factory ammo and handloads. I was surprised by the amount of lateral energy and measureable hydraulic displacement the Ruger ARX bullet generated. The Golden Saber made a somewhat larger and more ragged permanent wound channel in the ballistic gel as it tumbled in a straight track and came to rest heel first. The ARX tracked straight, left a cleaner but slightly smaller permanent wound channel, but it really unloaded lateral energy to a much larger and easily measured degree and the ARX penetrated further than the Golden Saber.

    There was no measurement of the ball ammo as it blew through 32" of gel without measureable lateral hydraulic transfer and parked itself somewhere down range, one of the reasons for shooting against a safe downrange backstop. The Ruger ARX offers the same advantages over ball ammo; no over penetration, much greater energy transfer and a similar bullet contour to assure feeding in autoloaders that specify ball ammo for reliable feed. OK, one gratuitous gel-o-shot of Ruger 45 Auto ARX...

    Your browser does not support the video tag.

    Accuracy

    I had some concerns that the flutes in the ARX bullet would have a negative effect on accuracy and stability, however, that proved not to be the case, The spinning bullet creates a pressure cone or boundary layer that prevents the flutes from disrupting air flow.



    I made the image above a little dark so that the distinctive holes left by the ARX bullets were clearly visible. At 50' rested, but not Ransom rested, the little LCP put up a 3/4" group, the best I've ever shot with this pistol, and the SR 1911 shot a 1 1/8" group. Very good accuracy from the Ruger ARX loads.

    The stigma of powdered metal...

    Seeing a composite of powdered metal and poly and I couldn't help but draw some associations with other brand's products that are made to be frangible; break up on material harder than tissue and won't penetrate sheetrock walls. Yes, PolyCase assures customers the ARX product is not frangible in the coming apart sense, but I never could leave well enough alone.

    I made up a stack of 4, 1"x10"x10" pine boards separated at the edges with 1/2" thick hardwood plywood spacers. No, the intention wasn't to construct a board penetration box, the intention was only to see if the ARX bullets broke up on early impact with a hard surface. They did not. Pictured left, the 380 ARX was recovered at full weight from the last board, sideways, and loaded with chunks of wood the flutes chewed out of the boards.

    The 45 Auto version of the ARX was not to be found in the same set up. Again, never an intention of checking pine board penetration, just a check to make sure the copper and poly bullet was not frangible and would not come apart with the first contact with a hard surface. The .45 caliber ARX literally blew the boards apart, putting the two halves together showed a bullet size hole punched through all four boards, suggesting lateral transfer of energy did all of the damage while the bullet stayed intact. There are no associations to draw. The ARX is a bullet of unique design, made with unique materials that performs as stated.

    In closing, it's past my bed time



    Not wanting to speculate, we posted the Ruger ARX product announcement, along with the developer's comments on the Real Guns Facebook page. We had ammunition on hand, but we wanted to take a little time to figure out how to assess some of the claims made regarding the bullet's performance and its unique personality. While there is a great deal of technical documentation from civilian and military sources to draw from for understanding, not a great deal could be interpreted and articulated for the site, so we constructed test methods everyone can duplicate.

    We've worked with a number of uniquely formed bullets from other manufacturers, most the product of bar stock, a screw machine and a vivid imagination where most demonstrated poor performance. One cup nose solid, touted as intended for the biggest and most dangerous game, could not penetrate 7" of plain ballistic gel without making an abrupt left turn and exiting test medium, where the application called for yards of penetration.

    In the case of the Ruger ARX ammunition, what looks very different overall, is actually a composite of very familiar, very sound and very mature design principles. What makes ARX ammunition work so well, is the thought process that put these elements together to form a product. Ruger ARX ammunition is priced approximately the same as other premium defensive ammo; approximately $22 for 20 rounds of 45 Auto ammo and $19 for 25 rounds of 380 Auto ammo.

  6. #46
    Boolit Master
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    Ruger lists the 77 gr .38 spl. @ 1116 FPS. Recoil is very mild, even in the 1" barrel 9 oz. Taurus View. The ruger load prints about 3" lower point of impact at 15 feet over a std. 125 gr 38 in my snubbys.

  7. #47
    I'm A Honcho!
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    Full wadcutter would be my choice after the premium factory HP ammo available today. The 158 gr RFN would be next.

  8. #48
    Boolit Master
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    Discussions of this sort are great fun, and give everybody (me, too) a chance to air their opinions! Like Elbows, everybody has two!
    Me: I am deathly allergic to loud, sharp noises. All the symptoms of a panic attack!...Genetic inheritance...and, I don't like recoil! That's a heckuva combination for a shooter to have, no? If I thought I could get away with it, .22 Long Rifle SD for sure!

    Having said that, I just don't understand those who insist on featherweight guns! 12-13 ozs! That's just breeding a flinch, imnho! I carried my 42 oz. 357 comfortably all day, but I realize there are people of smaller stature that may not find that possible. No wonder people are looking for "powderpuff" loads!

    Minimum for me, 2" barrel, 3" is better; STEEL gun, at about 25 ozs. Good, hand fitting grips. Then when/if I can find it, good SD factory ammo, Speer 135gr. +P SB, and Remington 38 Spl. LSWCHP. +P.

    I don't cast any more, but when I did the RCBS 150 gr. SWC proved excellent for IPSC competitons. BUT! The shoulder on the SWC did create a minor hang up now and then. RNFP might eliminate that. Buy a few boxes of whatever your choice of SD ammo may be, then load to nearly the same level with cast/plated/"J"woid projectiles for recreation/hunting/practice, as you wish. Then just sit and wait for another discussion like this to surface...don't worry, it won't be long...THEN, you can say; "IN MY CONSIDERED OPINION..."

    A couple of weeks ago, a fellow at the range Let me shoot his 6" 686 with Winchester White Box 110 gr. boolits...WOW! not bad atall atall! AND...it is findable in stores near me! Hmmm...
    Last edited by sniper; 08-02-2017 at 02:10 PM.

  9. #49
    Boolit Master Mytmousemalibu's Avatar
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    My daily carry S&W 442 is loaded with my own handload using the Lehigh Extreme Defense 100gr. copper solid behind a charge of Silhouette. In my pocket is my reload, a speedloader of the new Federal .38 Special HST. Its almost a jacketed hollow-base wadcutter loaded backwards! Its made for short barreled snubbies and being its the cream of the crop in Federal's SD line and bears the HST moniker, im willing to bet it performs quite well. Its brand new stuff, I had it back ordered soon as I could do its not commonly available yet. I'm anxious to see some test videos hit the web. Its accurate and cuts clean wadcutter holes in paper! I may try to throw a test together myself!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    ~ Chris


    Casting, reloading, shooting, collecting, restoring, smithing, etc, I love it all!
    Quote Originally Posted by GRUMPA View Post
    This innocent till proven guilty is more like a fantasy as time goes on. I don't know about you folks, but I for 1 am getting mighty tired of having to prove I'm innocent just because of what someone else thinks....

  10. #50
    Boolit Master
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    An educated guess would put penetration of 38 HST at the low end of FBI spec if not a little short of it. Hopefully I am a little wrong, but HST across the board in the calibers I am interested in tends to be as I described. I would like to see a less widely expanded bullet to help facilitate more penetration than the HST lineup normally provides.

    If I don't like what it does I can shoot something else or stick with my full charge Lee wadcutters. Lower penetration ammo from a snubby does not appeal to me.

    38 HST in a speedloader would be somewhat hangup prone compared to a bullet with a more rounded ogive protruding beyond the case mouth. In my opinion such rounds should be already in the gun and the speedloader ammo should be something more reload friendly.

    The deep seating of the HST will reduce the velocity variation the 38 is known for with changes in powder position compared to conventionally seated bullets.
    Last edited by 35remington; 08-02-2017 at 06:52 PM.

  11. #51
    Boolit Master
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    I'm more than just a bit skeptical of all of that advertising in post #45.

    While it is true that damage to the CNS or rapid blood loss will stop the fight, I'm not convinced that ARX projectiles are the magic bullet to achieve those results. I'm not saying they are false claims but I am saying that I seriously doubt it's a magic bullet.

    I'll wait for some real world data to accumulate before I abandon what has proven to work.

  12. #52
    Boolit Master Mytmousemalibu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 35remington View Post
    An educated guess would put penetration of 38 HST at the low end of FBI spec if not a little short of it. Hopefully I am a little wrong, but HST across the board in the calibers I am interested in tends to be as I described. I would like to see a less widely expanded bullet to help facilitate more penetration than the HST lineup normally provides.

    If I don't like what it does I can shoot something else or stick with my full charge Lee wadcutters. Lower penetration ammo from a snubby does not appeal to me.

    38 HST in a speedloader would be somewhat hangup prone compared to a bullet with a more rounded ogive protruding beyond the case mouth. In my opinion such rounds should be already in the gun and the speedloader ammo should be something more reload friendly.

    The deep seating of the HST will reduce the velocity variation the 38 is known for with changes in powder position compared to conventionally seated bullets.
    I can't say I disagree with you and are all valid concerns that had crossed my mind. With the new .38 HST being supposedly optimized for short barrels, I hope Federal did their homework to address some of the problems with .38 pocket snubbies. The HST has been on the market for quite a while in standard calibers but not in .38 Special, only the older hydroshock. If i had to guess, they might have had problems getting a more conventional HST design to work and hence the long delay? My has been choice that stays in the gun, that Lehigh copper solid XD addresses some of my concerns. It is light for caliber which it trades off in speed and due to the non-expanding design, penetrates well and it makes it a non clogging, barrier blind design that damages by fluid dynamics. Not everyone takes to this design but to each his own, im not judging. Hopefully should I ever need them, they do the job just fine and I am comfortable in trusting them. I don't carry more of them on my person for a simple reason, they are fairly sharp and they will tear up my pants. I know that sounds like a stupid reason, not to say it isn't, but chances I need to ever use my carry gun are remote, hopefully things stay that way, but if the climate I live in changes, I will reconsider my choices. I'm already at a disadvantage by only carrying a J-frame, obviously I'm comfortable with it. The new HST definitely won't shred my pants, which is a plus and it is completely different by design from my other ammo should it fail to work and I also carry a speedloader with 158gr plated RN in another pocket. With the bullet fully in the case with a nice roll crimp over the mouth, the short rounds are ridged in the speedloader and the short length actually makes the speedloader dumped in the cylinder. The longer the round, the more wiggly they seem and length makes getting them in tricky too so that is almost a draw. If i had to guess, the bullets seated like target wadcutters probably makes for a more efficient powder space, better burn and performance with more uniform spreads. It also might be partially be a way to gain false barrel length in these short barrels? I did pull a bullet to have a look at it and to see what the charge is like. The powder is a fine grain ball that seems to be pretty dang fast burning and if I recall, 4.3gr. I bet they are trying to drive that 130gr jacketed trash barrel up to speed as fast as possible. It's got some snap to it for sure, among the hottest if not the hottest +P ammo I have put in a J-frame. The guns its designed for by nature are a comprise, hopefully Federal capitalized on as much as they could for the new round.
    ~ Chris


    Casting, reloading, shooting, collecting, restoring, smithing, etc, I love it all!
    Quote Originally Posted by GRUMPA View Post
    This innocent till proven guilty is more like a fantasy as time goes on. I don't know about you folks, but I for 1 am getting mighty tired of having to prove I'm innocent just because of what someone else thinks....

  13. #53
    Boolit Master
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    My, if the longer rounds in the speedloader do not spin freely with the cylinder when inserted the speed loader is rubbing the grips. Relieve the grip and the rounds will drop in cleanly. I really cannot imagine a worse round for a speed loader than 38 HST.

  14. #54
    Boolit Master Mytmousemalibu's Avatar
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    I ran into that problem when I got the pistol because of the factory boot grip. It was great for comfortable shooting but ot didn't play well with speedloaders. That is why I put the classic style Altamont version, magna-like grips on the gun. They are thinner and much nicer though. They could be thinned a tad on the left but they are about as good as it gets. I practice with the gun including reloading it fairly regularly and I shoot revolvers for IDPA every other week. So I stay in good practice, far more than the vast majority of folks. I don't find it too difficult with the HST to be honest but I'm probably the exception. A round nose or truncated cone will index easier, no doubt.
    ~ Chris


    Casting, reloading, shooting, collecting, restoring, smithing, etc, I love it all!
    Quote Originally Posted by GRUMPA View Post
    This innocent till proven guilty is more like a fantasy as time goes on. I don't know about you folks, but I for 1 am getting mighty tired of having to prove I'm innocent just because of what someone else thinks....

  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petrol & Powder View Post
    I'm more than just a bit skeptical of all of that advertising in post #45.

    While it is true that damage to the CNS or rapid blood loss will stop the fight, I'm not convinced that ARX projectiles are the magic bullet to achieve those results. I'm not saying they are false claims but I am saying that I seriously doubt it's a magic bullet.

    I'll wait for some real world data to accumulate before I abandon what has proven to work.
    Are all barrels rifled in the same twist direction? It looks like those ARX bullets want to only go down the tube and spin in one direction in order to get the venturi affect they are talking about on the target.
    The road less traveled ain't for the faint of heart

  16. #56
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djones View Post
    Are all barrels rifled in the same twist direction? It looks like those ARX bullets want to only go down the tube and spin in one direction in order to get the venturi affect they are talking about on the target.
    Who knows?

    When the ARX develops 15 or 20 years worth of street results (if it remains on the market that long), I'll give an opinion on it.

    The ARX may be a great round but I'm not into fads, gimmicks and new trends when it comes to SD ammo. I've seen a lot of slick marketing in my life and I'm not impressed by it.

    Meanwhile, I'll stick with rounds that have well established track records in snubnose revolvers.

  17. #57
    Boolit Master
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    Same twist direction? Nope! Colts have left hand twist, Smiths right hand twist.

    My, I figure I need whatever helps my reload to be more likely to be successful, and if I need to reload the revolver it is likely not to come off as smoothly as I want in real life as opposed to practice. Maximum reliability even with Murphy in the mix comes with a more forgiving shape to be inserted in the cylinder.

    Even practicing I cannot load a wadcutter as easily and reliably as a protruding bullet cartridge.

  18. #58
    Boolit Master
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    ARX = slick marketing

  19. #59
    Boolit Master
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    As a boy, I was taught that "If you can't say anything nice, don't say anything at all." Hence my comments on ARX ammo. I was born at night--but it wasn't last night.
    I don't paint bullets. I like Black Rifle Coffee. Sacred cows are always fair game. California is to the United States what Syria is to Russia and North Korea is to China/South Korea/Japan--a Hermit Kingdom detached from the real world and led by delusional maniacs, an economic and social basket case sustained by "foreign" aid so as to not lose military bases.

  20. #60
    Boolit Master
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    The 158gr bullet in the middle and on the right came out of a snub nose revolver. Is that enough expansion for ya?

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    Don
    NRA Certified Metallic Cartridge Reloading Instructor

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check