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Thread: What are these?

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy
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    What are these?

    Found 3 bars in a garage I was working. No marks or stamps. The box it was in was unmarked as well. Seems soft lead like. I can scrap it rather dent it with a hammer and screwdriver. Its pretty soft.
    However when struck I get a ping vs dull thud. Anyone seen these? And yes guess what the plan of use is?
    Dino

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  2. #2
    Boolit Man
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    They look like lino pigs but that said who knows what type of lead they actually are.

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  3. #3
    Boolit Master
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    Three of the ingots are of the same form that Linotype is found. But we have seen some lino ingot molds for sale in the past, so that is not a sure indication. The fourth is a different type and slightly different luster. I would suspect it might be a richer alloy used to add to the lino to bring it up to normal grade.

    Simple matter to melt off a small bit to have one of the list members do the XRF scan at the cost of about one pound of lead per sample and know exactly what you have. I would say a good find regardless, and if tests prove out, it would be an excellent find. Good luck.

  4. #4
    Boolit Master
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    I was sold one of like the odd ingot and told it was lino

  5. #5
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty Bannister View Post
    Three of the ingots are of the same form that Linotype is found. But we have seen some lino ingot molds for sale in the past, so that is not a sure indication. The fourth is a different type and slightly different luster. I would suspect it might be a richer alloy used to add to the lino to bring it up to normal grade.

    Simple matter to melt off a small bit to have one of the list members do the XRF scan at the cost of about one pound of lead per sample and know exactly what you have. I would say a good find regardless, and if tests prove out, it would be an excellent find. Good luck.
    Link? Would love to donate a few pounds of other stuff I have.
    Oddball weighs 22 lb. The other 3 24 or so.
    Hope its something usable. The oddball came with some stuff I bought to cast.
    Dino

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  6. #6
    Boolit Master

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    I don't know how to post a link but the member is BNE. He has several post in the stickies about wheelweights. He's a good guy to deal with. Send him a PM and he will fix you up.

  7. #7
    Boolit Master
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    Probably zinc send them to me for disposal oink oink.

  8. #8
    Boolit Master
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    They need to be tested to be 100% certain that they are Linotype. OR... are they hard like lino? almost same hardness if you melt some off to test? Seem to melt very smooth and quicker than same sized COWW or plain lead ingot?

    Then you mix with other lead in recipes where you treat these ingots as linotype.

    The reasons for those questions:
    • Linotype rings when struck, lead goes thunk - so is it hard enough to ring, or takes a very hard pencil to dig a groove in it.
    • Melting and air cooling will soften lead that is only hard due to water quenching or heat treating. Lino is a harder alloy so a melted glop will be closer to the hardness of the bar. Imitation is probably water dropped or heat treated and melting removes that hardness, but doesn't impact Linotype alloy hardness nearly as much.
    • The tin in linotype causes it to melt at a lower temperature so faster than plain lead, it also flows better so it will tend to have a smoother appearance than WW's or plain lead when it hardens.


    Pigs or even linotype print bars can vary a bit in composition, they were remelted repeatedly and had some tin loss, they would get refreshed. You never know where in that cycle of depletion and refreshing a pig (bar with eye hole) is at. So once you know they are hard, smooth flowing casting metal you use as if it is tested & known linotype when mixing with other lead. Pretty sure 1/2% difference in one alloy or the other in the bars won't matter to most uses. Guessing weight is about 24# per bar.

    Test the bullets you make with your Lino mix, if they are too soft then maybe not a pure lino but still close to 100# of good lead, that shine on the top surface sort of looks like good alloy to me anyway.
    Je suis Charlie
    Scrap.... because all the really pithy and emphatic four letter words were taken and we had to describe this way of getting casting material somehow.
    Feedback page http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...light=RogerDat I do trade a bit from time to time.

  9. #9
    PAPERPATCH MASTER


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    My guess would be lino from what you say about them. If you can find a scrap dealer that can `shoot` an analysis of the lead bars that would settle the question. There are places that will also tell you what they are if you send them a sample.Robert

  10. #10
    Boolit Master
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    Melt one. lino and most type metals melt all at once. There is no slushy stage. When it cools it is the same thing, it gos from a liquid to a solid just like that. I had to learn some of this as a AP. when learning to work on large newspaper web presses. Never worked with lead plates but had to learn about it any way to get my card.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    This what a letter press printing plate looks like. It is 40lbs. If you look close at the bottom of the plate there is a .30cal. 165gr and a 150 LBT OWC sitting in front of it.
    Last edited by facetious; 07-18-2017 at 02:37 AM. Reason: can't spell

  11. #11
    Boolit Master
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    Window counterweights.... I buy'em every time I see'em. Ok..Ok...Ok .... yes...have been 'stung'....

    So...smelt with sawdust... go slow... keep under 700 or so and see what happens....

    But,,,I say it again....buy'em when I see'em.

    Nose Dive.

    Cheap, Fast, good. Kindly pick two.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check