Inline FabricationTitan ReloadingStainLess Steel MediaWisconsin Trigger
RotoMetals2Lee PrecisionGraf & SonsMidSouth Shooters Supply

Donate Now Goal amount for this year: 6000 USD, Received: 5345 USD (89%)
WE HAVE REACHED OUR GOAL! THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HELPED CONTRIBUTE AND KEEP US GOING!
Our Annual server fund drive is going on now! This donation drive helps fund Cast Boolits for an entire year, and helps support our 2nd amendment rights! You can donate by Paypal by clicking the DONATE button. Or by Cash / Check / MO to the address below:

Willy Snyder
PO Box 2732
Pocatello, ID 83206
****Due to overwhelming e-mails, I will be very slow in updating this list. Please bear with me!****


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 28 of 28

Thread: Birch stock is blonde

  1. #21
    Boolit Master

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Bloomfield, Nebraska
    Posts
    4,936
    And no matter what you do there not to bright? Try brown shoe dye and finish with dark walnut Danish oil.

  2. #22
    Boolit Master Traffer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Central Wisconisn
    Posts
    800
    Quote Originally Posted by waksupi View Post
    For best results when staining unfinished birch, leather dye works well. I blend brown, yellow, and red for the desired color.

    Attachment 198618

    Attachment 198619
    I am not a gun finish guy. I was a house painter/decorator for many years as I followed my father into the business. I never really tried to stain birch, knowing what kind of wood it was, I thought it would be a waste of time. I noticed that in the mid to late 70's furniture manufactures came up with a stain/finish, which was color in the finish that would be semi transparent. It was acceptable for cheap furniture but I wouldn't want it on a gun stock. I have used color in finish to "fix" blotchy worn mottled finish to blend the color. That looks OK from a distance but again not for a gun stock. Your results in these pictures is nothing short of amazing. Congratulations on figuring out a way to stain birch. These guns look fantastic.
    AKA hans.pcguy

  3. #23
    Moderator Emeritus / Trusted loob groove dealer


    waksupi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Somers, Montana, a quaint little drinking village,with a severe hunting and fishing problem.
    Posts
    16,732
    Quote Originally Posted by Traffer View Post
    I am not a gun finish guy. I was a house painter/decorator for many years as I followed my father into the business. I never really tried to stain birch, knowing what kind of wood it was, I thought it would be a waste of time. I noticed that in the mid to late 70's furniture manufactures came up with a stain/finish, which was color in the finish that would be semi transparent. It was acceptable for cheap furniture but I wouldn't want it on a gun stock. I have used color in finish to "fix" blotchy worn mottled finish to blend the color. That looks OK from a distance but again not for a gun stock. Your results in these pictures is nothing short of amazing. Congratulations on figuring out a way to stain birch. These guns look fantastic.
    Considering how many guns I have done, and that one of my jobs at a gun company was experimenting with different finishes, I can tell you it doesn't come easy!
    The solid soft lead bullet is undoubtably the best and most satisfactory expanding bullet that has ever been designed. It invariably mushrooms perfectly, and never breaks up. With the metal base that is essential for velocities of 2000 f.s. and upwards to protect the naked base, these metal-based soft lead bullets are splendid.
    John Taylor - "African Rifles and Cartridges"

    Forget everything you know about loading jacketed bullets. This is a whole new ball game!


  4. #24
    Boolit Man
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    109
    Most any alcohol stain or any of the proprietary solvent stains will work nicely to stain birch, elm, maple,,any of the light colored hard woods.

    Leather dye works well because it is just that,,a solvent based stain.
    Laurel Mtn makes some very nice working solvent based stains, I use them a lot.
    Most fine wood working sites carry different brands and even have powdered dye that is mixed with alcohol or sometimes water for staining. Some mfg'rs blend their powdered dyes to be mixed with only their own solvent,,Behr does or at least used to do that.

    The powdered dyes that are alcohol solvent are nice as they can be used to color shellac also for tinting finish.

    You can turn a piece of birch to ebony black in color w/ alcohol/solvent based dyes.

  5. #25
    Boolit Master

    gwpercle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    Posts
    3,338
    Minwax makes three one step stain & finish products that can be used on finished wood. Polyshade is brushed on.
    Woodsheen and their Wiping Stain and Finish are wiping stains , these are the two I like , applied with a foam rubber pad .
    The color will be in the finish and does not penetrate into the wood, but it will darken. I like the wiping stain & finish for stock work.
    Certified Cajun
    Proud Member of The Basket of Deplorables

  6. #26
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Missouri Ozarks
    Posts
    1,145
    My first center fire rifle was a SAKO L46 222 with a arctic birch stock. It was light blonde-honey colored. I thought it was attractive. It has been refinished twice in the last 60 years. I used a Min-Wax 'Fruit Wood' stain that darkened it some and, I thought, was rather attractive. OTOH I never did like the very dark almost muddy black colors of some black walnut stocks.

  7. #27
    Moderator Emeritus / Trusted loob groove dealer


    waksupi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Somers, Montana, a quaint little drinking village,with a severe hunting and fishing problem.
    Posts
    16,732
    Quote Originally Posted by BAGTIC View Post
    My first center fire rifle was a SAKO L46 222 with a arctic birch stock. It was light blonde-honey colored. I thought it was attractive. It has been refinished twice in the last 60 years. I used a Min-Wax 'Fruit Wood' stain that darkened it some and, I thought, was rather attractive. OTOH I never did like the very dark almost muddy black colors of some black walnut stocks.
    A big mistake many make with walnut stocks, is immediately thinking they need to use a stain. If the wood has any decent color or figure at all, a simple oil finish brings out it's best qualities. The only walnut I like to stain is some that has definite whitewood, as is seen in some cheaper kit stocks.
    The solid soft lead bullet is undoubtably the best and most satisfactory expanding bullet that has ever been designed. It invariably mushrooms perfectly, and never breaks up. With the metal base that is essential for velocities of 2000 f.s. and upwards to protect the naked base, these metal-based soft lead bullets are splendid.
    John Taylor - "African Rifles and Cartridges"

    Forget everything you know about loading jacketed bullets. This is a whole new ball game!


  8. #28
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    531
    A couple of light ones refinished..........
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P8150113.JPG 
Views:	8 
Size:	144.4 KB 
ID:	201922  
    "Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut." - Ernest Hemingway

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check