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Thread: Meet Paulie my black lab puppy

  1. #41
    Boolit Master
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    Look what happened to the German Shepherd. #1 in country can't even stand on it's rear legs straight up .

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  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ballistics in Scotland View Post
    You may have better strains of boxer in the US than in the UK. Here they have a startling range of hereditary illnesses, including a high rate of epilepsy, over 20% of puppies dying, and twice as many adults dying from cancer as from old age.

    Nine years ago there was a BBC documentary attacking what has happened when the wrong people got hold of certain breeds. Some of it was quite heartrending. They all had breed standards which specified a healthy and active look, but they judged dogs winners that didn't have it. The first reaction was to turn on members who had ratted them out to the BBC, the second to promise reforms. A good deal has been done, but the jury is still out.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedigree_Dogs_Exposed
    My last boxer died of cancer when she was 7 years old. Sure do miss her. The Boxer breeds here also have their issues like hips, eyes, cancer, etc. I stay away from boxers with to much white in them.

  3. #43
    As did my childhood labrador, at 8 I think, and a sample of one doesn't prove much. The last thing boxers need is the breed going extinct, or the gene pool becoming too limited to put anything right, because people are scared to take a chance on them.

    It is pitiful what was done with German shepherds, principally in order to make them bigger and give that sloping backline. A lot has been done to put matters right, but these things are faster to get out of a breed than into it. On temperament they have done pretty well, despite their frequent use for unattended guarding. My wife was a small child in Berlin when somebody built a wall just a few hundred yards away. But when the wall came down, the border force dogs were rehomed with civilians, and mostly turned out very well. Some were just ordinary police dogs, and the ones that just ran up and down on wires hadn't learned much of anything, including aggression, so they just fell back on natural instinct, which is that boredom is bad and humans are interesting.

  4. #44
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    The problem with any working class dog is that people get them because they like the look. And don't realize that they need to be kept busy and occupied more then other breeds. When they don't do that the dog becomes bored and then destructive
    And then the dog is abused.
    As I have said in another thread , when I was in my twenties the Doberman was the dog to hate. Small skull, brain get pinched off and becomes mean. BUT as the truth be told the dog comes out the way it was treated. 😒

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  5. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by XDROB View Post
    BUT as the truth be told the dog comes out the way it was treated. ��
    The trouble is, it can include treatment before it is born. It is certainly possible to have irreformably aggressive strains, if they are bred for the purpose, or for looks at any price. For sixteen years American pit bulls have been banned in the UK, ownable only by court approval and if neutered, tattooed, microchipped and muzzled. Of course there are American pit bull strains which are quite inoffensive, but I am sceptical of the idea that people imported more than a small trickle of that sort through quarantine. Why, when those pit bulls are usual indistinguishable from the common Staffordshire bull terrier - by appearance and by legitimate guarding behaviour, i.e. until the enemy quits? It was special fighting dogs that got imported. We owed those dog attacks, sometimes quite dreadful, to an unholy combination of prenatal and post-natal human brutes.

    I have a perpetual image of our legislators saying "Visually indistinguishable? However was one to know?"

  6. #46
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    yes there are more aggressive strains of dogs but a guy can sure take one of those strains and make it into a fine dog. Some breeds might be easier to make aggressive but I truly believe it can be trained out of any of them. I had a Rottweiler years ago. He went about a 130 lbs and was the gentlest dog I ever saw (well a tie anyway with my last lab) he wouldn't hurt a flea. Neighbor right now has a german sheppard that is about the same. My best friend claims the best and most gentle dog he ever had was is old Doberman. Daughter has two pit bulls that are about as mean as kittens too. Ive also seen very aggressive Labradors. Most case there dogs that are tied up outside and live in dog houses and are for the most part ignored. Or dogs that are actually encouraged to be aggressive. Ive had lots of dogs and many different breeds. To a dog they all craved love and if they got it they gave it back in spades. Tie me up, beat me occasionally and make me live out in the cold with nobody caring or giving me love and see how I treat you when you walk by.
    Soldier of God, sixgun junky, Retired electrical lineman. My office was a 100 feet in the air, closer to God the better

  7. #47
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    I do agree with that. When we went to breeder he was glad that the dog picked us and we picked him. He said that he (Logan) was one of the most calm of his litter mates. But yes some breeds have centuries of breeding behind them that needs to be taken into account when looking for a dog.
    He said that he gets a lot of people who are sometimes looking for the biggest, baddest dog. He won't sell them a dog. We interviewed with him a couple of time. I'v always wanted a dog, my wife of 36 years had to be on board. Life took a couple of turns for me this last year and opened the door for Logan to come home with us. I realize this situation is not normal for most dog owners. I did a lot of research before I decided on this breed. I am very happy with my choice. 😁

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  8. #48
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    I've had boxers my whole life. Had and bred them growing up, and will always have a boxer.

  9. #49
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    I have always had labs, my first lab Misty picked me. Her litter mates all hid behind mom, Misty waddled over and peed on my foot to mark me as hers... she was the best dog I have ever had. Also super gentle, my nieces and nephews used to ride her(when very little, by 2 they knew that was to much weight for her back), pull her tail and ears and she just loved it.

    Friends had dobermans, big babies that would lick you to death. Another friend had rottweilers that were the same, just big friendly babies who thought they were lap dogs. All were raised around lots of people coming and going, lots of love and attention from everyone...

  10. #50
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    that's the secret. Love, attention and interaction with people when there young. I truly believe there no such thing as a bad dog. Just bad owners.
    Quote Originally Posted by MaryB View Post
    I have always had labs, my first lab Misty picked me. Her litter mates all hid behind mom, Misty waddled over and peed on my foot to mark me as hers... she was the best dog I have ever had. Also super gentle, my nieces and nephews used to ride her(when very little, by 2 they knew that was to much weight for her back), pull her tail and ears and she just loved it.

    Friends had dobermans, big babies that would lick you to death. Another friend had rottweilers that were the same, just big friendly babies who thought they were lap dogs. All were raised around lots of people coming and going, lots of love and attention from everyone...
    Soldier of God, sixgun junky, Retired electrical lineman. My office was a 100 feet in the air, closer to God the better

  11. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd Smale View Post
    yes there are more aggressive strains of dogs but a guy can sure take one of those strains and make it into a fine dog. Some breeds might be easier to make aggressive but I truly believe it can be trained out of any of them. I had a Rottweiler years ago. He went about a 130 lbs and was the gentlest dog I ever saw (well a tie anyway with my last lab) he wouldn't hurt a flea. Neighbor right now has a german sheppard that is about the same. My best friend claims the best and most gentle dog he ever had was is old Doberman. Daughter has two pit bulls that are about as mean as kittens too. Ive also seen very aggressive Labradors. Most case there dogs that are tied up outside and live in dog houses and are for the most part ignored. Or dogs that are actually encouraged to be aggressive. Ive had lots of dogs and many different breeds. To a dog they all craved love and if they got it they gave it back in spades. Tie me up, beat me occasionally and make me live out in the cold with nobody caring or giving me love and see how I treat you when you walk by.
    ,
    I think you'd be right about making some kind of fine dog - perhaps even an adult individual which has been not only bred as a fighting dog or ferocious guard, but owned by humans who deserve to be microchipped, tattooed, muzzled and neutered? But some British pit bull attacks have been within the family, and if truth has been told. completely without warning. A lot of people don't have enclosed land, and need a dog which may sometimes be poked and pestered by strange children, or subjected to boisterous uninvited play by strange dogs. I'd be very wary of those dogs, in those circumstances. It took a long, long time to rehabilitate the English bulldog into the gentle soul he is today.

    I'm not surprised by what people say about rottweilers, though. For centuries they have been out of the breeding business, or perhaps out of this world, for a single instance of the behaviour that gets a Jack Russell kicked off and treated to some uncanonical language. The trouble is, the few bitten by rottweilers are likely to stay bitten. Surprisingly I heard, a few years back, that the most frequently biting dog in the UK was the golden retriever. Retrievers have only really existed since people learned to shoot flying, but in recent decades, while a fair proportion of labradors are still in employment that requires discipline, golden retrieves were bred for blonde good looks. The bite usually being relatively minor allowed the situation to worsen, but it's the wrong time to tell someone to count his blessings.

    My mother's labrador, never had retriever training. But she would put in a protest at being left in the car by leaping twelve times over the front seat and positioning her half-dozen eggs in a row in the back. Our own used to run around the garden with kittens in her mouth. Even their mother realised it was just what labradors do, and the one we kept used to come begging for a ride when he was half-grown.


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    This is Sandy, an Omani wild dog Australians will recognise as very like a dingo. She turned up in his garden as a juvenile, saying "Give us a job", just like young wolves did outside the cave long ago. The surprising thing is, she made a determined job of becoming a model house-dog in all respects. His Omani landlord was amazed, because although he could believe in a good dog, he thought you had to buy them from an expensive importer. She now lives in retirement with him in Spain. I'd have had no hesitation in adopting the Arabian ones who regarded me as their special friend.

    We all have stories of the behaviour human-induced artificial instincts have put into dogs. But that can be bad as well as good. In some cases I would feel happier with dogs which had handled centuries of matchmaking on their own.

  12. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by XDROB View Post
    Meet Logan. Purebred Belgian Malinois
    He will be a news member of our house hold next week.

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    Hide everything! Leave nothing on the floor ha ha, wonderful dogs, ours was hell on wheels when he was a puppy

  13. #53
    Something very odd happened last night. Lanty Hanlon the Irish terrier loves TV, maybe because we have LED screens now, as few dogs did in the days of the scanning cathode ray tube. I don't think he distinguishes fighting from boisterous play, in humans or animals, as both are exciting. But bullying is something else, as he recognises and gets angry at it.

    Last night there was a movie in which a dog was dead or unconscious, dappled with blood, and held in his master's arms. I believe the canine eye sees red as black, like old orthochromatic movie prints, so it would just be a spotty dog to him. It is a peculiarity of Irish terriers that they don't bark much, but have a wide vocabulary of other noises. Even Jack London says so, a hundred years ago. Lanty threw back his head and howled, just twice. I haven't heard a dog do it since I gave up playing the piano accordion at the age of twelve. Nobody knows all that is in a dog's mind.

  14. #54
    Boolit Master copdills's Avatar
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    Great Pics guys real nice

  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by vepr12dude View Post
    Hide everything! Leave nothing on the floor ha ha, wonderful dogs, ours was hell on wheels when he was a puppy
    I really laughed when I saw this. Because just the other day i caught him running across the kitchen with a (pair) of slippers clamped in his mouth.

    We have a three tier shoe rack near door we come on. First two tiers are bare now and I'm sure in s few weeks we will be putting the rack somewhere else.

    Also have full harness for him, didn't like standard collar pulling on his neck.


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  16. #56
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    sure is a cute looking little guy.
    Soldier of God, sixgun junky, Retired electrical lineman. My office was a 100 feet in the air, closer to God the better

  17. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by XDROB View Post
    I really laughed when I saw this. Because just the other day i caught him running across the kitchen with a (pair) of slippers clamped in his mouth.
    Both of the pair? That argues fine manipulative skills in one so young. I once reassembled something and found myself short of four 2mm. nuts, the size of split peas. I found them in a neat row on his favourite landing of the stairs, and I would give a lot to know if Lanty made one trip or four. But he was old enough to take his responsibilities seriously.

    A harness is fine for some breeds, especially small, thin-necked ones. But I know someone who used them on two huskys, and it handed them the opportunity to pull like sledge-dogs all their lives.

  18. #58
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    Don't want to take away from his skills, but they were near back door that we come in and out of a lot. They were together. I think he just happened to grap them just right.
    On the harness, he should be around 60 lbs when full grown. I have never really been a fan of collars and when talking to my breeder and a bunch of trainers and dog people the consensus was get him a harness so there is no damage to his neck or throat. Especially when driving in the car. Just safer for the dog and you.
    On the pullng part, I plan on getting him, me, and wife trained. I want to be able to walk with him leash free. He is a very intelligent breed. The breeder also trains. And I have witnessed a couple of his dogs and owners work their dogs. It was very impressive.

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  19. #59
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd Smale View Post
    sure is a cute looking little guy.
    Thanks, I'm so in love with his ears. Very expressive. When he hears something his head comes up, ears erect, when really concentrating the ears come together, tips just about touching.


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  20. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by XDROB View Post
    I have never really been a fan of collars and when talking to my breeder and a bunch of trainers and dog people the consensus was get him a harness so there is no damage to his neck or throat. Especially when driving in the car. Just safer for the dog and you.
    For the car, yes, certainly. In the UK it is compulsory to restrain the dog in some way, but the law is fulfilled by preventing interference with the driver or becoming a dangerous projectile in a crash, rather than protecting the dog. A lot of people do it with a wire partition, confining him to the rear seats or the trunk area of a hatchback. It is better than nothing from the dog's point of view, as it lessens the distance he can be hurled, and is better to hit than solid metal or glass. But Lanty Hanlon has a special car harness, with alternative attachments to attach to either the socket or the strap of the human seatbelt. The medium size ran out of adjustment just as he finished growing, making it a shade tight for comfort in running and very deep breathing, which is probably the best for car safety. He now freezes in his normal hyperactivity to get the harness or his lead put on, as he knows there is something in it for him.

    Frederick the Great used to classify officers according to whether they were intelligent or stupid, hard-working or lazy. The hard-working and stupid one had to be got rid of, before he did the wrong thing with huge energy, but you could find a safe use for stupid and lazy. An intelligent and hard-working officer would make a good chief of staff, but the intelligent and lazy one was destined for high command, as he would always think "Are we really doing this the best way?"

    In similar fashion I used to think we should get four types from canine intelligence and eagerness to please. I think more dogs than we realise are as intelligent as border collies. But Lanty is clever, very eager to please, but thinks he does it just by being him. I always imagine a conversation between him and his friend, a small and shy border collie who lives around the corner:

    "Look, you realise this instant obedience training thing is just one of their jokes, right? A dog can't go very wrong as long as he is friendly."

    "So who gets out in the street all day to meet kids?"

    Do that with Lanty and he would be at the local primary school at break time, helping out deprived kids who have nothing but other kids and footballs to play with. Not that he would touch them, but can you count on a five-year-old communicating "I got dizzy watching him, and fell over"?

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