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Thread: 2 Cycle Fuel Question.......

  1. #1
    Boolit Master

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    2 Cycle Fuel Question.......

    Bought a small lightweight chainsaw for tree trimming and small chores around the house. This saw says a fuel mix of 1:40 with synthetic oil and 89 octane gas. All my other 2cycle equipment use a 1:32 fuel mix and regular gas.

    My question is this; if I run 1:32 in the new saw will the extra oil foul the plug or gum something up? What about the high octane fuel? I really don't want to have two separate mixes to keep track of. If it doesn't matter, I'll just run it like the others. But if it does, then it may be more trouble than it's worth.

    What say ye? I know there are those out there with LOTS of experience with saws.
    Thanks!
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  2. #2
    Boolit Master
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    In my experience a little extra oil doesn't hurt a thing. Been doing it for years on the advice of my chainsaw distributor. Just makes a bit more smoke. GW
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  3. #3
    Mosin Guy/Forum Sponsor Josh Smith's Avatar
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    Should be fine. I used to run richer than that in an outboard.

    It's an anti-pollution measure is all.

    Oil will kill catalytic converters where those are a concern.

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  4. #4
    Boolit Master
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    My son in law gave me a Mcculloch that one of his co workers was throwing away. It was a classic example of ethanol fuel, rotted lines crumbling primer bulb and plugged carb. For less than 10 bucks of parts including a carb kit she was ready. The fuel cap said 1-40 but all I had was 1-32 for my other stuff. Well that saw will not even start on 1-32. The local farm store has little bottles of 1-40 sythetic oil for 1 gallon of gas. I mixed up a gallon and I'll be darned if that saw doesn't start first pull every time. Usually when I tried a heavier mix I just got a little extra smoke and more power but not this time with this saw.

    I'd say give the 1-32 a try and if it doesn't work well just turn the saw upside down and give the 1-40 a try. Kind of a pain in the butt keeping the different mixes. Just try to avoid ethanol at all cost if you can where you live, its the kiss of death in small engines.

  5. #5
    Boolit Master

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    I run 40:1 in everything with the highest octane I can get. 93 I think. 100s of hrs on saws no problems.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master
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    One of my saws takes 1:25. Run it at what they say and don't worry about it.
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  7. #7
    Boolit Master


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    There was recently a similar discussion on RCGroups.com regarding the amount of oil in larger gasoline model airplane engines. I have several gasoline engines from 1.4 to 2.4 cu. in. (26-40 cc) Some experiments that were done scientifically (actual measurements taken) showed that a little more power was gained at 32:1 over the lower oil concentrations. Speculation was that the extra oil helped the ring seal better and it did not lead to fouling the spark plug. The overwhelming oil of choice for use in RC airplanes was Red Line Racing Oil. I had been using Husqvarna 2 cycle oil which produces thick black (think tar-like) exhaust residue. I purchased some Red Line but have not tried it yet. Flyers that have used it say the residue is negligible. It's transparent red and looks very clean. I found it at a motorcycle shop where they told me most of their sales of that oil were to RC flyers.

    David
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  8. #8
    Boolit Master
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    I can't imagine that the octane rating would matter on a 2 stoke chainsaw engine. So for the 87 vs 89 octane question, I would buy the 87 and carry on. However, if it is at all possible to purchase non-ethanol fuel in your area, I would highly recommend non-ethanol fuel in ALL of your small engine applications. That alone will save you a lot of headaches. Octane is simply a rating of how much heat & pressure a fuel can tolerate. There's no additional power to be had by using higher octane fuel UNLESS you have the corresponding compression ratio to utilize that higher octane fuel.

    As for the 32:1 vs 40:1 mix - If it will run on the 32:1, go for it. The only downside is a bit more smoke. Small, two-stroke engines like the ones found in chainsaws, trimmers, leaf blowers, etc. are basically disposable. That's not to say they will wear out quickly; they will not. With maintenance they can give decades of service. However, when they do finally wear out they are generally not worth repairing. By the time you wear out a chainsaw engine the rest of the saw is about done. I'm not sure if there would be a significant difference in life expectancy of chainsaw engine rated for 40:1 that was run on a richer oil mix of 32:1. In any event, at the end of its life I wouldn't spend $250 to repair a $350 saw that was 15 years old.

    If the richest fuel/oil mix for your small two-strokes is 32:1 and all of your equipment will actually run on 32:1 - use that mix as your lowest common denominator mix for all of your two-stroke engines. The benefit is simplified fuel storage, one fuel/oil mix for everything. The only downside is a little more smoke.

  9. #9
    Boolit Master
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    More oil does not hurt anything. Just don't burn ethanol in it. May be good for cars that drive everyday but not for small engines. My brother in law and I both run stihl's. He contact the company about this question as small engines have changed over the years. They informed him that more will not hurt, less will.

  10. #10
    Boolit Master Moleman-'s Avatar
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    Brother in law (a DR) has a few Husqvarna pro grade chainsaws that are supposed to run 50:1 or perhaps it's 60:1. He somehow got the saw hot enough to melt the piston 8-9 years ago. Brought it to me saying it just stopped running and wouldn't start and the local Husqvarna dealer said the like new saw wasn't worth fixing. Had no compression but would run a short time with a little 90wt oil in the cylinder. Took it apart and found the melted piston had trapped the rings, thus the no compression. They sell new piston/cylinder kits for them so I put one in and the saw was back in business. Asked what ratio he was running and suggested he back down to 32:1 or 40:1 and only keep one mix of gas instead of one for each two cycle mixture he had. Haven't had to replace a piston since.

  11. #11
    Boolit Master
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    We use this now and our tools run like a raped ape.
    http://trufuel50.com/product-info/




  12. #12
    Boolit Master
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    I'd have no problem running a little more oil.
    but I'd run the extra octane.
    I run the ethanol free premium in all of my small engines, especially anything that might have some fuel left in it for a year or so.
    I run it in the boat, 4 wheelers, the lawn mowers, [and the Mustang] they sit in storage over the winter and only gets started occasionally.
    it adds up to maybe 35 gallons in all the little engines, in a years time.

    cheap insurance to cough up the extra $17.50 a year.
    it's all an educated guess,,,, till the trigger is pulled.

    this opinion brought to you by mister low-tech solution..

  13. #13
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plate plinker View Post
    We use this now and our tools run like a raped ape.
    http://trufuel50.com/product-info/



    This stuff is a great start! In this day and age, with quality 2stroke oils, there is no need to run anything at 32:1 or higher. The older oils weren't that great, thus the higher mix ratio. No, it won't hurt anything, other than a shorter spark plug life, to run richer.
    Also the octane rating matters a lot, the better the fuel, the longer before it settles into water! The non-ethanol is without a doubt the best for OPE engines because it doesn't seperate as bad. Keep in mind most ethanol fuels are rated for two or less months of storage now, they separate and collect water after that.
    I use the Royal Purple two stroke oil, they say you can run the synthetic at 100:1 but I'm anal about my two stroke equipment. I run it at 50:1 with the best grade (least amount of alcohol content) I can get my hands on.
    I have a Shindiwa M231 powerhead I bought around 2004, I've never had to clean the carb and each spring it starts within five pulls, with the gas in the tank from last fall.
    Quality of gas and oil mix really does matter.

  14. #14
    Boolit Master 54bore's Avatar
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    I have worked in the woods all of my life as a logger/timber faller, I run a stihl 660 and use stihl HP Ultra 2 cycle oil 50:1 ratio, my saw runs 6 hrs a day. I have zero issues with fouled plugs etc.

  15. #15
    Boolit Man
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    While the can gas mix is pricey if you are going to use it only here and there it is worth it.

    I put sta-bil and a lead substitute in every five gallon jug I get. Mowers chainsaws and weed eaters start right up after sitting all winter. If I have a rare problem, a little moonshine and sea foam added to the fuel takes care of it.

  16. #16
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plate plinker View Post
    We use this now and our tools run like a raped ape.
    http://trufuel50.com/product-info/



    This is great if you don't have ethanol free fuel available in your area. But it's quite expensive at $20+ a gallon. I will stick w/ ethanol free for slightly over $3 a gallon plus the oil. If you use very little the premix cost doesn't mater. But burn up even a few gallons a year and it adds up quick.

  17. #17
    Boolit Master
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    I use Lucas Ethanol Additive. It's supposed to kill the bad effects of the ethanol although I can't say I've ever seen the bad ethanol fuel do anything to my stuff. I also add a little Marvel to all oil. I don't know if it does any good but I do it anyways. If your going to let the fuel sit any length of time use StaBil.
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  18. #18
    Boolit Master






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    yup higher octane isn't the answer for 2 strokes unless they had the compression bumped up and NEED it. It makes them harder to start and ALOT of the premium fuel today gets it higher octane rating from adding alcohol and alcohol isn't what you want in a two stroke motor. Octane is a burn retardant. It makes fuel burn cooler. It use is in high compression motors that tend to have spark detonation. Run it in a motor that isn't designed to use it and you will actually loose power.
    Quote Originally Posted by Petrol & Powder View Post
    I can't imagine that the octane rating would matter on a 2 stoke chainsaw engine. So for the 87 vs 89 octane question, I would buy the 87 and carry on. However, if it is at all possible to purchase non-ethanol fuel in your area, I would highly recommend non-ethanol fuel in ALL of your small engine applications. That alone will save you a lot of headaches. Octane is simply a rating of how much heat & pressure a fuel can tolerate. There's no additional power to be had by using higher octane fuel UNLESS you have the corresponding compression ratio to utilize that higher octane fuel.

    As for the 32:1 vs 40:1 mix - If it will run on the 32:1, go for it. The only downside is a bit more smoke. Small, two-stroke engines like the ones found in chainsaws, trimmers, leaf blowers, etc. are basically disposable. That's not to say they will wear out quickly; they will not. With maintenance they can give decades of service. However, when they do finally wear out they are generally not worth repairing. By the time you wear out a chainsaw engine the rest of the saw is about done. I'm not sure if there would be a significant difference in life expectancy of chainsaw engine rated for 40:1 that was run on a richer oil mix of 32:1. In any event, at the end of its life I wouldn't spend $250 to repair a $350 saw that was 15 years old.

    If the richest fuel/oil mix for your small two-strokes is 32:1 and all of your equipment will actually run on 32:1 - use that mix as your lowest common denominator mix for all of your two-stroke engines. The benefit is simplified fuel storage, one fuel/oil mix for everything. The only downside is a little more smoke.
    Soldier of God, sixgun junky, Retired electrical lineman. My office was a 100 feet in the air, closer to God the better

  19. #19
    Boolit Master
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    Yep a bit spendy but still worth the money. You can get it in gallons now but unsure if there is a price break. Seems that loggers and others that would run for hours a day could benefit from it if it was available in drums.

  20. #20
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plate plinker View Post
    Yep a bit spendy but still worth the money. You can get it in gallons now but unsure if there is a price break. Seems that loggers and others that would run for hours a day could benefit from it if it was available in drums.
    I bought a case on sale, really just like the cans so now I refill them with non-ethanol gas with stabil added. I only use maybe 5gal a year.

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