Titan ReloadingRotoMetals2MidSouth Shooters SupplyRepackbox
ADvertise hereWidenersInline FabricationLee Precision

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28

Thread: flux

  1. #1
    Boolit Bub
    dragonfire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    whiskey capital of the world
    Posts
    56

    flux

    I plan on turning my ww's into ingots ,do i need to flux if i'm just making ingots? ,i have bar solder i plan on adding at a later date ,i'm new to this so any info is most helpful ,thanks.

  2. #2
    Moderator Emeritus

    wiljen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    4,549
    It is a good idea to flux as you smelt so as to remove as much crap as possible. I'd rather remove the stuff early when working in a dutch oven than wait and try and get it out of my casting pot. Anything carbon based will work. I've used waxes, transmission fluid, sawdust, and recently have been stirring my pot with a 1.5" diameter dowel. Commercial fluxes work fine too, they just tend to cost more than sawdust, wax, etc and don't necessarily do anything the homebrew varieties don't do just as well.

  3. #3
    Boolit Bub
    dragonfire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    whiskey capital of the world
    Posts
    56
    How much wax would you use to flux a 4 quart dutch oven?

  4. #4
    Perma - Banned


    Bret4207's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    St Lawrence Valley, NY
    Posts
    12,926
    Welcome to the clan Dragonfire. It's not a matter of how much flux is needed to do a certain amount of alloy, but rather how much will it take to clean the alloy you have. A really dirty batch will take a lot more than a really clean batch. Essentially you flux and stir and skim the crap off the top. Then you flux some more and keep going until the batch seems clean. Be advised, there will be a dull gray almost oatmealy type of stuff that floats to the top at first, once you're past the real dirt stage. Get the mix hot and try fluxing this back into the alloy. Stir with a wooden stick and keep stirring. A lot of this stuff is tin/antimony alloy and will remix. Some is dirt and dust and lead oxide. Fluxing a batch of WW into usable alloy will take 20-30 minutes more or less. It takes time to get the stuff hot enough to flux well and then time to get whatever will remix back into the alloy. You will probably find specks of black stuff that keep floating into the mix from someplace. I think a lot of that is rust from the cast iron pots we all love. Since I went to a stainless pot I get a lot less of that, at the cost os a little less efficient heat transfer, or so I'm told.

  5. #5
    Boolit Bub
    dragonfire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    whiskey capital of the world
    Posts
    56
    So i just need to take my time and eyeball it ,i have worked with the solder baths at work so it shouldnt be to hard for me ,we didnt have to flux those , the fluxing has got me kinda looped but it seems simple enough ,with a little practice and the help of good people on this forum i just might become a decent boolit caster yet,thanks

  6. #6
    Boolit Grand Master

    Wayne Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Hampton Roads, Virginia
    Posts
    11,303
    The few times I've done it the ww were so dirty with oil and grease that they were self-fluxing. One or two experiences will tell you all you need to know.
    Wayne the Shrink

    There is no 'right' that requires me to work for you or you to work for me!

  7. #7
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    So. Cal.
    Posts
    1,482
    What Wayne said. Never clean wheel weights, the oil, grease ,etc is self fluxing. Never hurts to add a little sawdust to the mix and stir with a wooden dowel. Really clean ingots are a joy to cast with. Have never heard of anyone overfluxing. Enjoy and avoid the smoke and bad smells. Duckiller

  8. #8
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Upstate SC
    Posts
    373
    I use pure beeswax and flux the H*** out of the first melt and stir until the flames go out(watch your gloves). After that I flux when the tin scum floats enough to make getting a clean dipperful difficult. The flame from the flux actually raises the melt temp anyway; at least on the top. Type of flux varies by whim, and the beeswax doubles as a film lube for my SG slugs. If you have a heavy tin mix you'll have to flux more often depending on the casting temp. CB.
    If you want your children to follow in your footsteps, be careful where you walk.
    Beware the man that only owns one gun; he probably knows how to use it.
    Some things never change; others change more slowly.

  9. #9
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    New Market, Iowa
    Posts
    439
    I use sawdust when melting down range scrap. Just sprinkle a small handfull on top of the molten lead, wait for it begin smoking, then throw a lighted match onto it. When the fire goes out, skim the crud off.

  10. #10
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    151
    I flux when making ingots. I will use saw dust/chips and some times use candle wax after. I will also flux again when casting slugs.

  11. #11
    Boolit Grand Master

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    England,Ar
    Posts
    5,671
    Quote Originally Posted by agentwolf View Post
    Has anyone else thought of using old dirty tumbling media as their casting flux?
    I've played around with several different types of sawdust, dry leaves and shredded paper. My best results have been when using pine sawdust. I'm guessing the resin is what makes the difference.

    I would think that your used media would work but not as well as other stuff.

    I use sawdust when smelting scrap, followed by some type of wax. I only use wax in my casting pot.

  12. #12
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    NE Kansas
    Posts
    1,196
    Check this thread. Site search is very handy and informative.

    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...-as-flux/page2

  13. #13
    Boolit Master

    gwpercle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    Posts
    4,974
    Smelting in a large pot is the one place I find the use of Marvelux commercial powdered flux the best thing to use , it doesn't flash and erupt into a ball of fire .
    Tossing in a big chunk of beeswax and having an unexpected flash fire is unnerving to say the least!!!
    Gary
    Certified Cajun
    Proud Member of The Basket of Deplorables

  14. #14
    I like the fire from using paraffin...adds extra heat to help melt the load.

  15. #15
    Boolit Grand Master

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    England,Ar
    Posts
    5,671
    Back to the original post, yes you should flux it. The better job you do making ingots means cleaner material in your casting pot. I use pine sawdust and flux a few times followed by some type of wax. For a Dutch oven I probably would use a coffee cup of sawdust followed by an inch or so cut off of a candle. You can light both of these with a lighter to reduce the smoke.

  16. #16
    Moderator



    JonB_in_Glencoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Land of 10,000 Lakes
    Posts
    12,492
    Quote Originally Posted by agentwolf View Post
    Has anyone else thought of using old dirty tumbling media as their casting flux?
    agentwolf,
    Welcome to the forum.
    When smelting WW, you want a flux that will quickly become carbon. Media may take a while to burn up, into carbon. Another issue could be introducing more Junk, whatever is in "old dirty tumbling media", into your smelt pot...as the media burns and turns to ash as you stir the smelt, that Junk could become airborne. Typically the Junk contains some Lead Oxide from used primers ...and that is something I would prefer not to breathe in.

    I use saw dust as a flux. I prefer pine/fir saw dust.
    During smelting, I also use a tiny bit of paraffin wax to reduce the alloy, right before pouring into ingots.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    “If someone has a gun and is trying to kill you, it would be reasonable to shoot back with your own gun.”
    ― The Dalai Lama, Seattle Times, May 2001

  17. #17
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    barry s wales uk
    Posts
    1,901
    I use some boolit lube and stir with a piece of wood seems to work ok

  18. #18
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    1,038
    I tried it with walnut hull and corncob, both clean (I also worried about contaminants). They worked ok, but not as well as pine sawdust, and a bit better than pine needles. Pine wood shavings from a planer also worked well.

    From what I’ve read, carbon containing materials have two benefits for us: they produce carbon monoxide as they burn, which helps reduce the oxides, and they act as an adsorbant to take impurities out of the alloy. Extra heat from the burning material helps both processes.

    I’m thinking that sawdust and wood shavings have more surface area and burn faster and hotter than granular media. The extra surface area helps adsorb more contaminants, and supposedly the resin in pine wood helps too. There’s also that I find the burned wood shavings a bit easier to skim out of the melt than the walnut hull bits.

    I also add generous chunk of paraffin wax to the pine; I think it helps with more heat and more reduction.

  19. #19
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Pleasant Hope MO
    Posts
    1,017
    I use pine pet bedding because it is easy for me to get.

  20. #20
    Boolit Mold Jhopson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    17
    I use pine pet bedding for my first two fluxes and then some candle wax. In my casting pot I use beeswax.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check