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Thread: Dispelling Some Myths-SAAMI Video

  1. #21
    Boolit Master



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    I store my ammo in 50 cal ammo boxes(metal)and wonder if there is a fire would there be be a pressure build up in these cans.They are water proof and I presume vapor proof.
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  2. #22
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    There would probably be some pressure buildup, but not to the extent of a tremendous explosion. More of a pressure relief/release, since the metal of the can is a fraction the thickness of a chamber.

    After all, the military stores their ammunition in those cans, and they have more exposure to fire than the average homeowner.

    Hope this helps.

    Fred
    After a shooting spree, they always want to take the guns away from the people who didn't do it. - William S. Burroughs.

  3. #23
    Boolit Master




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    Yes, there would be a pressure buildup dependent as to how hot the ammo box would get. If it gets hot enough to "COOK OFF" then it would be a good idea not to be close as you will have a nice bomb. Probably the best place to keep ammo stored like this would be in a fireproof safe, as they will keep even documents save with no damage for up to 120min without the fear of them being damaged because they keep the temperature under anything combustionable. All of the safes I've looked at also have warranties for repair/replacement if they are exposed to a "SEVERE" fire. I've seen safes opened after a fire and even the finish on gun stocks were not harmed.
    Just my thoughts.
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  4. #24
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by w5pv View Post
    I store my ammo in 50 cal ammo boxes(metal)and wonder if there is a fire would there be be a pressure build up in these cans. They are water proof and I presume vapor proof.
    I know, this is an old thread.... I don't believe a metal ammo can would present any danger due to a cook off of contents as no significant pressure could build up. The gasket between lid and can would melt or burn away before the ammo in the can could cook off. Even if some pressure did build, that thin wall of mild steel would bow out easily and allow an ever bigger vent. Or the thin steel bales used to hold down the lid might overload and fail, releasing the lid altogether....

  5. #25
    Boolit Bub
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    Nice video.
    Thx

  6. #26
    Boolit Bub
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    Quote Originally Posted by w5pv View Post
    I store my ammo in 50 cal ammo boxes(metal)and wonder if there is a fire would there be be a pressure build up in these cans.They are water proof and I presume vapor proof.
    They are purpose built to store ammunition and have been virtually unchanged in 100 years.

    That tells me they do their job without much risk.

  7. #27
    Boolit Master
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    The most dangerous potential explosive you will commonly see is the small oxygen and acetylene cylinders that many tradesman carry in vehicles.Demolished houses and decapitated bodies are not uncommon.Yet when have you ever heard any one express concern about them.Never,unless it comes from a fireman or cop.The explosions are caused by laziness or carelessness.Cant be bothered turning "the gas "of.

  8. #28
    Boolit Master



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    Interesting, but it still hurts to see all that good ammunition destroyed.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregLaROCHE View Post
    Interesting, but it still hurts to see all that good ammunition destroyed.
    That's most people's response.

    The video was made to dispel some of the myths surrounding the storage of ammunition, and was primarily intended to train firefighting personnel, but it's of interest to anyone involved in the shooting sports. (and some of their spouses, too)
    After a shooting spree, they always want to take the guns away from the people who didn't do it. - William S. Burroughs.

  10. #30
    Boolit Buddy okietwolf's Avatar
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    Oh Lord the wasted ammunition....please have mercy on those who did not know better.....lol
    Quando omni flunkus, moritati

  11. #31
    Boolit Master

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    I know this is an old but very interesting thread which has been brought back to life so to speak for our viewing, education, and/or comment. I also store powder in old ammo cans within a confined locked and secured climate controlled closet. My question is, would it be better to store powder if it were located in say an unheated outdoor shop but within an old chest type freezer. The freezer would not be turned on and the lid would be down but not locked. My question is two fold taking into account first safety, and then protecting the integrity of the powder during storage. So, from a safety point of view, would this be a better alternative to storage in an ammo box within a climate controlled area. Then, from an economic point of view in which I desire the powder storage to not be detrimental to the integrity of the power for future use. In other words can the handloader have his cake and eat it too when it comes to safety and storage of powder by using an inoperable freezer compartment in a non climate controlled space?
    Mark 5:34 And He said to her (Jesus speaking), "Daughter, your faith has made you well. Go in peace and be healed of your affliction."

  12. #32
    Boolit Bub
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    Quote Originally Posted by smoked turkey View Post
    I know this is an old but very interesting thread which has been brought back to life so to speak for our viewing, education, and/or comment. I also store powder in old ammo cans within a confined locked and secured climate controlled closet. My question is, would it be better to store powder if it were located in say an unheated outdoor shop but within an old chest type freezer. The freezer would not be turned on and the lid would be down but not locked. My question is two fold taking into account first safety, and then protecting the integrity of the powder during storage. So, from a safety point of view, would this be a better alternative to storage in an ammo box within a climate controlled area. Then, from an economic point of view in which I desire the powder storage to not be detrimental to the integrity of the power for future use. In other words can the handloader have his cake and eat it too when it comes to safety and storage of powder by using an inoperable freezer compartment in a non climate controlled space?
    If you want a specific reference, NFPA 495 Chapter 14 is where I'm getting this and what would address gunpowder, primers, etc.

    Quantities not exceeding 20 lbs are permitted to be stored in the original containers in residences.

    Quantities exceeding 20 lbs, but not exceeding 50 lbs, can be stored in a residence where kept in a wooden box or cabinet having walls of at least 1" nominal thickness (all sides).

    I wouldn't store it in a freezer, ammo cans, or anything else that doesn't allow venting in the event the powder could ignite. While unconfined the powder will just burn really fast, once you confine it those gasses build up and cause detonation of whatever it's in.

  13. #33
    Boolit Buddy
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    Around here every so often you'll see on the news a house is on fire. If the firemen hear one round cook off they'll back off and let your house burn down. "It's for the safety of our people." I would get arrested cause I'd grab a reel line and go in while calling them cowards.

  14. #34
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    This video was made by Rick Patterson with the intent of educating fire departments as to what actually occurs in the event there is a fire and there is stored ammunition. If you know someone who is either a full time fireman, or a volunteer fireman, please provide them with the link to this video. This will benefit us all by doing away with some of the myths surrounding ammunition storage and fires.

    Hope this helps.

    Fred

    PS: It also wouldn't hurt to have some spouses view it, too....
    After a shooting spree, they always want to take the guns away from the people who didn't do it. - William S. Burroughs.

  15. #35
    Boolit Master

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    Catch22 thanks for the info from NFPA. I believe a wooden crate type of storage would be fairly easy to make and that takes care of the safety portion of my question. The proper storage of gun powder requires it to be stored in a cool dry place as well. My shop in the summer is definitely not a cool place, although it is mostly dry, but high humidity would be a factor much of the time. I was hoping to come up with a practical solution for storage that would meet both safety and environmental requirements so as to keep my investment in powder and primers not only safe but protected from temperature and humidity fluctuations. It sounds like a wooden box stored in the home would be considered the best for both conditions.
    Mark 5:34 And He said to her (Jesus speaking), "Daughter, your faith has made you well. Go in peace and be healed of your affliction."

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