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Thread: US Ordnance Corps Manual for the Mosin-Nagant, 1954

  1. #1
    Boolit Master Josh Smith's Avatar
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    US Ordnance Corps Manual for the Mosin-Nagant, 1954

    Hello,

    The folks at http://www.weaponscache.com had a PDF file that they wanted to post as images, so I turned those 32 pages into JPEG pictures. I thought you all might enjoy it here, too.











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    Boolit Master Josh Smith's Avatar
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    Boolit Master Josh Smith's Avatar
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    Boolit Master Josh Smith's Avatar
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    Regards,


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    Boolit Master JIMinPHX's Avatar
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    Do you still have the PDF?
    “an armed society is a polite society.”
    Robert A. Heinlein

    "Idque apud imperitos humanitas vocabatur, cum pars servitutis esset."
    Publius Tacitus

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    Boolit Master Josh Smith's Avatar
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    Hello,

    I do.

    Josh

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    Boolit Master Artful's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting this.

  8. #8
    Boolit Mold
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    I got some Soviet manuals on field instruction and armory refurb of 1891, carabines and snipers. They are in ... Russian, but if you are desperate, I could look for whatever you are looking (I speaketh)

  9. #9
    Boolit Buddy
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    Awesome! Thanks for sharing!

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    Old Ironsights's Avatar
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    And if you don't know what's in your Spam Cans...

    A Democrat that owns Guns is like a Vegan that owns Cats...
    C2N14... because life is not energetic enough.
    Gott und Gewehr mit uns!...
    Death is only The End if you assume the Story is about You.
    1.618034 Fnord
    מנא, מנא, תקל, ופרסין - Daniel 5:25-28 - Got 7.62?


  11. #11
    Boolit Master
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    The Mosin Nagant was used by the U S as a training rifle during WW1, designated M1916 rifle.
    The Above posted manual is probably drawn from the manual used at that time.

    I've seen a M1916 manual posted on a history site dealing with the Archangel Expedition. That might come in handy if you can find it.
    Most likely the manual would have dealt specifically with the remaining Remington manufacture rifles that the russians never got delivery of.

  12. #12
    Boolit Bub Possumcop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Multigunner View Post
    The Mosin Nagant was used by the U S as a training rifle during WW1, designated M1916 rifle.
    The Above posted manual is probably drawn from the manual used at that time.

    I've seen a M1916 manual posted on a history site dealing with the Archangel Expedition. That might come in handy if you can find it.
    Most likely the manual would have dealt specifically with the remaining Remington manufacture rifles that the russians never got delivery of.
    Wasn't the Mosin actually issued to U.S. troops deployed to Russia during the revolution in order to ensure ammunition commonality with our White Russian allies?
    I seem to remember reading somewhere that the US troops that carried them were less than impressed.
    I guess by that point we didn't have any 7.62x54R Winchester Model 95's left here to send.
    7.62 NATO, It's kinda like 5.56 NATO, but for men...

  13. #13
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    The point of a Mosin is not to be impressed. It is to have a functional rifle that can stay functional, and lethal, in the hands of Ivan the Peasant no matter what.

    I like mine a lot. It will never be pretty, or smooth, or sub MOA, but I can take a hacksaw and dremel to it without angst and it will still shoot 3 MOA with anything I feed it. ... which is plenty for the purpose it was made for.

    I'll take another case or two please.
    A Democrat that owns Guns is like a Vegan that owns Cats...
    C2N14... because life is not energetic enough.
    Gott und Gewehr mit uns!...
    Death is only The End if you assume the Story is about You.
    1.618034 Fnord
    מנא, מנא, תקל, ופרסין - Daniel 5:25-28 - Got 7.62?


  14. #14
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Possumcop View Post
    Wasn't the Mosin actually issued to U.S. troops deployed to Russia during the revolution in order to ensure ammunition commonality with our White Russian allies?
    I seem to remember reading somewhere that the US troops that carried them were less than impressed.
    I guess by that point we didn't have any 7.62x54R Winchester Model 95's left here to send.
    One of my early shooting coaches and mentors was one of the Polar Bears, so I got an earful about the MN. He was definitely not a fan, but acknowledged that the thing worked if you kept it reasonably clean and appropriately lubed, down to -40F or so--something he couldn't say about the 1895 Winchesters.

    In extreme cold, they were cleaning/degreasing rifles with white gas, and lubing with kerosene. The MN could be (relatively) quickly stripped of the stock, dunked in gas, drained, and re-assembled. The Winchesters' mechanisms were more complicated, and took more work to maintain. Since maintenance was done outside in the cold, I suspect the Winchester users weren't doing a thorough job, leading to problems.

    He also remarked that the MN was easier to load while wearing mittens, and less prone to freezing up when fired prone in the snow.

  15. #15
    Boolit Master
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    Wasn't the Mosin actually issued to U.S. troops deployed to Russia during the revolution in order to ensure ammunition commonality with our White Russian allies?
    I seem to remember reading somewhere that the US troops that carried them were less than impressed.
    I guess by that point we didn't have any 7.62x54R Winchester Model 95's left here to send.
    As it happens I had remembered this thread day before yeterday and did a search hoping to find the M1916 manual online, no joy there so far, but I did find a discussion of the Polar Bear/Archangel expeditions.
    Turns out some U S troops were issued the Mosin Nagant and others carried the 1903 Springfield. The Springfield was carried by troops serving in the far North in Siberia while the mosin Nagant was carried by U S Troops guarding the stockpiled war material at the port of Archangel. These were two different units under different commanders and with very different mission goals though all was interconnected.
    Apparently the troops issued the MN had been carrying the M1917 rifles and had turned these in then received MN rifles in England before embarking. They also took along some British Lewis Guns that had been converted to 7.62X54R.

    The 1891 rifles were a bit long and unweildy compared to the Springfield. The later short rifles are quite handy.

    The Wincheter 1895 rifles were still around during WW2 , and issued to partizans. Some years ago a documentary on arms smuggling showed a under cover video of Russian black marketeers selling a truck load of rather beat up looking Winchester 95's. So there may still be a few in circulation over there.
    I've been told that the clip guide of the 7.62 Winchester 95 is practically useless, but they insisted on it.
    I'd really like a 95 in .303 or .30-40. The .303 carbine was a great favorite of British cavalry or mounted infantry officers. The .30-06 model has a rep for shooting loose unless they fired only the 150 gr WW1 era ball ammo , and modern made repros in that chambering apparently have had the same problem unless only 150 gr ammo is used. Hotter or heavier bullet .30-06 loads are not recommended.

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