Lee PrecisionTitan ReloadingInline FabricationADvertise here
MidSouth Shooters SupplyWidenersRepackboxRotoMetals2

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 47

Thread: Lyman Tru Line Junior

  1. #1
    Boolit Grand Master
    Ben's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, AL
    Posts
    8,863

    Lyman Tru Line Junior

    I purchased a Lyman Tru Line Junior Turret press a few days ago,
    ( see photo below )

    The press has compound linkage. A very nice press, I bought it with intentions of loading 38 Spec only ( I'll be using a T/C resizing die ) . It seems to have plenty of horse power for loading 38 Specials.

    My turret takes 7/8 X 14 dies and I have a 2nd turret that came with the press, the 2nd one takes 310 dies ( I may sell that one ? ).

    My question is this.....When were these made, is there any history on these presses that you know about that you could share. Years of production , etc.

    Last edited by Ben; 04-22-2012 at 08:03 PM.

  2. #2
    Boolit Master

    Roundnoser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    896
    I'm gonna say that Pressman would be your best bet for historical information on these. I seem to recall he had an afinety for similar presses like Redhead, CC Johnson, etc. -- I suspect he will see this thread before too long!
    Jon

  3. #3
    Boolit Master


    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Eastern South Dakota
    Posts
    3,533
    Ben,

    You don't lay about on the sofa all day and smoke dope & eat bon-bons, do you? Nice press.


    Cat
    Cogito, ergo armatum sum.

    (I think, therefore I'm armed.)

  4. #4
    Boolit Grand Master
    Ben's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, AL
    Posts
    8,863
    Cat,

    Ummm ? ? I guess my answer would be no..........

  5. #5
    Boolit Master
    HeavyMetal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Orange county, Ca.
    Posts
    3,944
    Pressman's answer will be interesting and I look forward to seeing it!

    I think these were made into the mid 60's? Production was after WWII? Just plain old guessing here! The compound linkage design was the later version and I have several of them.

    The real nice part is someone took the time to add the 7/8's x 14 turret which really adds to the use of this machine.

    I have a compound linkage Jr. with the 6 hole turret and it handily full length size 357 and 44 case's, if I put just a touch of Imperial sizing die wax on them!

    Of course this is using a carbide die!

    It's a nice portable unit, I have on set up as a range press with a 4 hole 7/8s x 14 turret.

    Lyman still makes a conversion to standard shell holders and they have a longer primer punch kit as well! I have both on the 6 hole press but not on the 4 hole.

    Found that 4 tru line shell holders do 90% of the case's I reload. Bought them as they became available and keep them in the press box!

    It really is a fun press and after you use it a bit you'll wonder why Lyman never upgraded it and kept in the line.
    Last edited by HeavyMetal; 09-28-2014 at 10:37 AM.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Lesage WV
    Posts
    2,433
    make sure you keep the back support rod tight to the turret. and keep it oiled
    its a 50s era the top is after market
    Dont use it for fl resizeing rifle brass and it will last you for long time
    the shell holders are the J type , no longer made
    ebay is your friend

  7. #7
    Boolit Master
    LUBEDUDE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    2,618
    Nice, it should serve you well.

  8. #8
    Boolit Master

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    4114.27 yards North of the PRK.
    Posts
    1,254
    From a member here Re: Tru-Line Jr.

    woody (and anyone else interested):

    The following is a summary of the history of the Lyman Tru-Line Jr.
    presses I wrote up for a couple of other tool collectors. I hope
    some of you, at least, will find it helpful:

    "I had been dimly aware that there was something "funny' about T-L
    Jr. dies, and a few months ago saw mention that the tool linkage
    came in two forms. Last night I did some more checking on the tool,
    and found that it and its dies are, indeed, more complicated than I
    had realized. The Tru-Line Jr. tool, with its four-station rotating
    turret tapped 5/8" x 30 tpi, was introduced in or around 1949 (per
    the "Lyman Centennial Journal"; my set of Lyman Annual Product
    Catalogs is as-yet incomplete for this period), and at that time had
    a simple, direct linkage, with two long blued bars (one on either
    side) connecting the handle toggle to the moving case-holder
    assembly. The dies were the same as for the contemporary 310 tool:
    decapping chamber ("D.C."), muzzle resizer ("M.R."), expander die
    ("E.C.") with expander plug ("E.P.") for the appropriate bullet, and
    the classic "double-adjustable" chamber ("D.A.") for seating (and
    crimping, if required), with a seating stem (S.S.) matched to the
    chosen bullet nose profile. The only difference was that, instead of
    the external priming chamber ("P.C."; the hallmark of the 310's with
    their screw-in case-head bushing, as opposed to the earlier,
    steel-handled tools cut for a specific case head diameter), the T-L
    Jr. used a more conventional shell-holder ("S.H.") which descended
    over a priming punch ("P.P.") in the tool base on the down stroke.
    These designation are from Ideal Handbook No. 38, (January 1951),
    pp. 30-31. Full-length sizing, if required, was still done with the
    separate die and knockout rod system. My tool and die set are of
    this early design, and I got the matching F. L. die set with the
    recently-acquired late No. 10 tool in the same caliber.

    Two years later (HB #39, May, 1953), the tool body and linkage were
    the same; but for bottle-necked cases only, a "Combination Die"
    replaced "D.C.", "M.R.", "E.C." and "E.P.", with the muzzle-resizing
    function built into the earlier decapping die body, and an expanding
    button screwed onto the decapping stem, to expand the case mouth as
    it was withdrawn from the die, in conventional (Pacific, RCBS, etc.)
    fashion. This allowed the T-L Jr. to be set up with two sets of two
    dies each, for rifles at least. (HB #39 glosses over loading of
    straight-walled cases; they evidently used the older four-die set,
    as before.)

    By HB #41 (July 1957; HB #40 doesn't show much of anything on the
    T-L Jr.), however, there had been a major revision to both tool and
    dies. The single link on either side of the tool had been relaced by
    a shorter one, pinned to the "elbow" of a second L-shaped link
    attached to the toggle and frame, giving the same "compound" effect
    as that of the RCBS A-2 tool (which evidently inspired the change).
    This linkage changes the leverages of the system so that the rising
    element carrying the shell holder has rapid movement and low
    mechanical advantage at the start of the upstroke (and for priming,
    at the end of the down-stroke), but slows down and greatly increases
    the leverage as the shell carrier approaches the top of its stroke.
    This made it possible to provide full-length sizing for
    straight-walled pistol cases (and for certain other short cases) in
    lieu of just resizing the case mouths. The die sets were
    correspondingly revamped and re-designated. For bottle-necked rifle
    cases, decapping, muzzle resizing and case mouth expanding were
    performed in the combination die (now labelled "die S") as in the
    previous setup; for pistol cases, the decapping rod was used in a
    new body (die "R") which also provided full-length sizing. Oddly,
    muzzle-resizing was still retained for pistol cases, using the same
    die as before (now, die "B"), and case mouth expansion was also as
    before (die "F"). Seating and crimping utilized the D.A. chamber
    (now die "E") and seating screw for both types of cases. The shell
    holder and priming post were relabelled ("J" and "T", respectively)
    but otherwise unchanged. So, "rifle" die sets consisted of two dies:
    "S" and "E"; while pistol sets took dies "R", "B", "F" and "E", four
    in all, but now allowed full-length sizing. Around the same time,
    the earlier number coding for 310 and T-L Jr. dies by specific
    cartridge ("123" for .30-'06) was changed to a more complex form
    which I still have not completely sorted out.

    This must have posed a real nightmare for the Lyman stock-keepers,
    especially as they were also going through a lengthy evolution in
    their other tools, towards the "standard" C- and H-press and 7/8" x
    14 tpi die systems used by other makers."

    Sorry for taking up so much space.

    floodgate

    Regards, Woody
    Regards, Woody
    ---------------------------
    Take a kid along.

  9. #9
    Boolit Master


    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Eastern South Dakota
    Posts
    3,533
    Ben,

    I was just commenting (poorly) on the fact that you're able to post quite a bit about new reloading projects lately. And your posts are always informative & helpful.


    Cat
    Cogito, ergo armatum sum.

    (I think, therefore I'm armed.)

  10. #10
    Moderator

    Pressman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    In the Gopher State of Minnesota
    Posts
    4,393
    Thjanks Woody, you saved me a lot of time - which is in very short supply lately.
    Ken

  11. #11
    Boolit Grand Master
    Ben's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, AL
    Posts
    8,863
    Thanks to all for your help.

    Ben

  12. #12
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Central VA
    Posts
    3,361
    Ben,

    Just a couple of quick observations from a guy who has several Jrs set up to use for specific rounds. First, even the later version with the improved linkage does not have the sheer strength of even the smallest ones made originally for 7/8 X 14. Just because the new head takes larger dies doesn't mean that the press is any stronger. I limit mine to pistol cartridges that I don't have to resize (or I resize them on a "big" press) and to smaller rifle cartridges or those that will be shot in the same chamber and don't need sizing.

    I have loaded 45-70s and 32-40s on TL Jrs, but both were for Winchester high-walls and I did just the least bit of neck sizing on them. Mostly I just used the press to seat the bullets and take the bell out of the case mouth while putting in minimal crimp. Anyway, I'm sure you will enjoy your new acquisition, especially if you limit yourself to the class of cartridges it is good with.

    BTW, I took one of my TL Jrs and bolted it down to a 2 X 4. I then clamp it to a bench or table at the range so I can experiment with loading different bullets and/or powder charges right there. Works well for me!

    Regards,
    Froggie

  13. #13
    Boolit Master



    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Alturas, California...where the west still lives!
    Posts
    2,177
    Froggie, thanks for posting that. There seems to be a movement to change the poor little Jr. into a miniature progressive or something. A lot of folks are intrigued by the idea of a a small press that will take "normal" 7/8" x 14 dies and fail to think about how really small it is! Or as my old mentor put it so many years ago, "They're springy, really springy if you push them too hard. Just keep what the original designers had in mind and you'll do fine."

  14. #14
    Boolit Buddy Ziptar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rockingham County New Hampshire
    Posts
    438
    That's my old press!

    I'd only ever used it for .45 Colt and it did just fine with it, or any straight walled pistol ammo for that matter. Full sizing rifle brass would be too much for it I think.

    I got it, used it, and liked it for the very reason 3006guns mentioned. It is small.

    It did what I needed it to do and didn't take up much space, I wouldn't have ever sold it if I hadn't received a Lyman T-Mag a while ago and also have an even smaller HDS Compac hand press. I'm 6' 4" and like to stand when I reload so I found myself using the T-Mag more often due to its longer handle and because it s a bit taller. Other than that it did everything I needed easily.

    It didn't seem right to have it knocking around my bench anymore and just stuffing it in a box to maybe never be used again so, I offered it up here and I am glad to see Ben putting it to good use.

    A while back Pressman was kind enough to send me PDFs of the 1952 and 1960 instruction manuals. I put them on my web server so you can download them.

    http://www.ziptar.com/reloading/Lyma...tions_1952.pdf

    http://www.ziptar.com/reloading/Lyma...tions_1960.pdf

    On a related note. Just yesterday I was poking around on eBay and noticed that the gentlemen that had been making and selling the 7/8"-14 die plates for the Tru-Line Jr. is now selling them again. http://www.ebay.com/itm/261009171172

  15. #15
    Boolit Mold
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    1
    On a related note. Just yesterday I was poking around on eBay and noticed that the gentlemen that had been making and selling the 7/8"-14 die plates for the Tru-Line Jr. is now selling them again. http://www.ebay.com/itm/261009171172[/QUOTE]

    Thanks,
    I have been scanning the internet for a couple week looking for this, with no success. Price is a bit high but what I want!

  16. #16
    Boolit Master
    44Vaquero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Warren, MI
    Posts
    1,266
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	WP_001199.jpg 
Views:	109 
Size:	26.5 KB 
ID:	116833
    I absolutely love how this thread repeats itself about every year and a half! I would truly love to know how many of these marvelous little presses were built? Considering the steady stream of them on E-bay it has to have been 1000's! Mine is dedicated to .32 H&R Mags, although it has been used for .38's and .45 ACP's too.

    Rocxx, I have the gentleman's E-mail address that makes the 7/8 x 14 dies. Send me a pm, he will sell direct a little bit cheaper.
    My hero's have always been Cowboys!

  17. #17
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Central VA
    Posts
    3,361
    44Vaquero, I use one of my TL Jrs as a dedicated unit for 32 S&W Long. I've got a nearly-as-old All American set up as my 327 Fed Mag press. For now I've kinda skipped over the 32 H&Rs.

    Froggie
    "It aint easy being green!"

  18. #18
    Boolit Master
    44Vaquero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Warren, MI
    Posts
    1,266
    Green Frog, I have thought about having my Single-Six (6.5 inch) converted over to .327 FM but in truth the H&R has done everything that has ever been asked of it by me. I bought mine back when they were brand new and factory ammo was non-existent. Dies were not even available, so my Grandfather built the press pictured below for me.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Old School Reloading.jpg 
Views:	84 
Size:	99.7 KB 
ID:	116838
    My hero's have always been Cowboys!

  19. #19
    Boolit Master

    Bent Ramrod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Southern Arizona
    Posts
    3,507
    The last mention of the Tru-Line Jr. in the Handloader's Digest was 1970, in the sixth edition. By the time the 7th edition came out in 1975, it was no longer offered.

  20. #20
    Moderator

    Pressman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    In the Gopher State of Minnesota
    Posts
    4,393
    1947 through 1971/72?? Lyman seems to keep no records and no one has any memory. If they made just a thousand a year, and that seems low, there are plenty on the used market.
    As an 17 year old with no money and no idea what I was doing I began with the 310 tool and quickly moved to the next logical step, the Tru Line Jr. I loaded everything I needed to shoot on it until 1985 when I was issued a Glock 17. Needing to master the Glock I quickly realized I was going to have to modernize my reloading. Then I found a Red Head press at a gun show and I was off in a different direction.

    Ken
    Antique Reloading Tool Collector, Historian and Writer
    Newsletter editor: Antique Reloading Tool Collectors Association
    Archive manager, Antique Reloading Tool Collectors Association
    email: herters@netins.net
    www.antiquereloadingtools.com

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check