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Thread: Lead alloy calculators

  1. #41
    Boolit Master para45lda's Avatar
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    This has already been noted/addressed. Like Bumpo says - it's the best thing we got right now. It's an alloy calculator not an alloy reduction calculator. Welcome to Cast Boolits also. Good to see new folks.

    Thanks again Bumpo.

    Wes
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  2. #42
    Boolit Master


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    The linear formula works pretty well to approximate the alloy-hardness curve over a limited range. As has been noticed, it fails at the boundary. Still, it's a good way to look at how hardness changes as a result of small changes in alloy. Could probably create another formula that worked better for very low concentrations of tin and antimony.

    Mark

    And, me too, welcome aboard!

  3. #43
    Boolit Master
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    Thanks guys.

    If you look at the note section, you'll see the formula:
    Estimated hardness calculated by Rotometals formula: Brinell = 8.60 + ( 0.29 * %Tin ) + ( 0.92 * %Antimony )
    Or in other words:
    8.6 + a modifier for tin + a modifier for antimony

    What can be learned from this is that antimony impacts hardness about three times more than tin. I bet this formula was derived by experimentation at Rotometals on some of their alloys. They did not test low % alloys, so that is why the formula starts at 8.6.

    I've noticed that the formula only seems to be close to the published values when both tin and antimony are over 0.5%. The numbers are more accurate when the tin and antimony %s are close to each other. If you calculate the hardness for Lyman #2 and Hardball, you get 15 for both. Lyman #2 should be 15 and Hardball should be 16.

    I hope you guys find the calculator useful. Let me know if anything else is missing or doesn't look right.
    Ronald Reagan once said that the most terrifying words in the English language are: "I'm from the government and I'm here to help".
    Download my alloy calculator here: http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?t=105952

  4. #44
    Boolit Mold halx's Avatar
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    Thank you for the explanation and warm welcoming. I should definitely spend more time researching the forum, because I'm very new to the casting. I have an idea to play with very soft alloy (i.e. BHN=7) for my 357 revolver bullets, but not sure how to get below 8.6 using the Rotometal's Super Hard. Is there any specific calculator for that available?

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by halx View Post
    I have an idea to play with very soft alloy (i.e. BHN=7) for my 357 revolver bullets, but not sure how to get below 8.6 using the Rotometal's Super Hard. Is there any specific calculator for that available?
    Buy 30:1 alloy from Rotometals. It is in the range of 7 BHN.
    20:1 is 7.8 BHN.

    CM
    Retired...TWICE. Now just raisin' cows and livin' on borrowed time.

  6. #46
    Boolit Mold halx's Avatar
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    That's too easy I have a stash of pure lead which I'd like to utilize.
    GP100 (.357), S-12, Reloading

  7. #47
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    1 part Superhard to 9 parts Lead should reduce the overall Antimony concentration to 3% which should be pretty close to what you are after. If that is still a bit hard try 1 part to 10.
    Cast Bullet info
    http://www.castpics.net/

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  8. #48
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by halx View Post
    Thank you for the explanation and warm welcoming. I should definitely spend more time researching the forum, because I'm very new to the casting. I have an idea to play with very soft alloy (i.e. BHN=7) for my 357 revolver bullets, but not sure how to get below 8.6 using the Rotometal's Super Hard. Is there any specific calculator for that available?
    If you look at the column on the right on my table, you'll see the published values for the different alloys. Chilled shot is the closest alloy that I have found to what you requested. It has 2% antimony and the hardness is 10. You will need to get the antimony lower than that to get closer to 7 if you want to make it out of Superhard and pure lead.

    Using this mixture you should get something close:
    0.375 lbs (= 6 ozs) of Superhard
    10 lbs of pure lead
    = alloy with 1.08% antimony

    You could also get some stick-on WW lead. It should have a hardness about 6 or so. No mixing required.
    Ronald Reagan once said that the most terrifying words in the English language are: "I'm from the government and I'm here to help".
    Download my alloy calculator here: http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?t=105952

  9. #49
    Boolit Master


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    My stickons test between 6 and 7, depending on moonphases and such.

  10. #50
    Boolit Master Ole's Avatar
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    Bump.

    Bumpo's calculator should be a sticky, IMO.

  11. #51
    Boolit Master
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    I saved it on my computer so it is for me
    but you are absolutely rite it is very nice
    Hit em'hard
    hit em'often

  12. #52
    Boolit Master


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    I'm loving this calculator, thank you. It doesn't have to be laboratory-grade for my bullets, just close enough to give me an idea of what to expect if I mix, say, 50 lbs of WW with 50 lbs of range scrap - and then perhaps drop in a 1lb bar of 50/50 solder.

    Again, thanks a million
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  13. #53
    Boolit Master
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    Excellent work, this sure saves lots of time.
    Thanks very much for making this available

  14. #54
    Boolit Master
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    Thanks for all of the comments.
    I got a request to add silver solder to the calculator. I added a column for silver % and a row for 96% tin, 4% silver solder.

    Lead Alloy Calculators 011512.zip
    Ronald Reagan once said that the most terrifying words in the English language are: "I'm from the government and I'm here to help".
    Download my alloy calculator here: http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?t=105952

  15. #55
    Boolit Master
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    As mentioned, this is a GREAT source for the site, especially for us newer folks who are scrounging to get alloy materials together.

    Thanks again for your work on this.

  16. #56
    Boolit Buddy
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    Thanks Bumpo! Nice work

  17. #57
    Boolit Master
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    LeadAlloyCalculator052012.zip

    Thought I'd give this a face-lift and a unit-cost calculator.

  18. #58
    Boolit Master popper's Avatar
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    Lee W - You don't need that hard an alloy for 9 or 40, maybe for 10mm. 98/1/1 is fine for SA. Done both, no accuracy, feeding or leading difference, just more trouble. I did the 95/2.5/2.5 with As, HT (~18 BHN) for 30-30 @ ~2000 fps OK, but for .40 it's too much trouble and $.

  19. #59
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oreo View Post
    Thought I'd give this a face-lift and a unit-cost calculator.
    Thanks for the nice feature suggestion. I added your concept to my original format and filled in as many prices for alloys as I could find.

    I originally intended the alloy calculator to also serve as a reference sheet when printed out. So, the cost calculator was added to the next page as a 'module'. I set the margins so that if it is printed as "portrait', then you get the alloy calculator on the first page and the cost calculator on the second page. If you print as 'landscape', then you get the alloy and cost calculator on one page, and the notes and cost results on the second page.

    Lead Alloy Calculators 052612.zip
    Ronald Reagan once said that the most terrifying words in the English language are: "I'm from the government and I'm here to help".
    Download my alloy calculator here: http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?t=105952

  20. #60
    Bulletsmith/Engineer


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    I have an issue with the % values in the upper section for 10:1, 20:1, 25:1, 30:1 etc.

    The answer is in fact 3.85% Tin for 25 to 1 alloy, not 4% Tin.

    That is according to Lyman 4th Edition, Cast Bullet Handbook.

    They say that 10 to 1 is 9% Tin (1/11 * 100 = 9.0%)
    and 20 to 1 is 4.8% Tin (1/21 * 100 = 4.76%. They rounded up to 4.8%)

    Based on that, my math was correct and 25 to 1 is 3.85% Tin. (1/(25 + 1) * 100 = 3.85%)

    Also, going in another direction I found a quote from a Glen Fryxell article on bullet metals:

    Glen wrote, “… For hollow point bullets I have grown fond of using 25-to-1 alloy (6 lbs pure lead with lb. of 50/50 solder)…..”

    The math on that shows Glen’s 25 to 1 recipe to be 3.85% Tin as well.

    Live and Learn! Learn to trust what you know!

    So, Rotometals 25 to 1 is not the classic 25 to 1 alloy of old, it is actually 24 parts Lead to 1 part Tin, with 4% Tin!
    Go here for a complete explanation: http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?t=158582


    So,

    10 to 1 alloy is 1/(10+1) * 100 = 9% Tin
    20 to1 Alloy is 1/(20+1) * 100 = 4.80% Tin
    25 to 1 alloy is 1/(25+1) * 100 = 3.85% Tin
    30 to 1 alloy is 1/(30+1) * 100 = 3.20% Tin

    Just a heads-up! I PM'd you as well. I am pretty sure that I am correct. If I am not, please let me know!

    Thanks,

    DC-1
    Last edited by Defcon-One; 07-05-2012 at 09:49 PM.

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BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
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