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Thread: Annealing Jackets

  1. #41
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    Sorry.

    Back in the early 1970's, my first duty station with the Sheriff's Office was Boron, CA., outside the north gate of Edwards AFB. The Air Force had a big investigation as to why there wasn't much brass coming off their rifle and pistol ranges. It seems the personnel working the ranges had a small business on the side making and selling brass belt buckles.............

    Now everytime I see melted brass, it makes me think about those guys, since I'd met most of them. I don't know what the final outcome was, but I understand they were making some pretty good belt buckles, from pure brass.

    Fred

  2. #42
    Boolit Master
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    No problem, just messin' with ya.

    Maybe those guys got more experience producing metal items - license plates?

  3. #43
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    When I anneal 22 rf cases to use for jackets I use my outside wood furnace.I take a 2" pipe nipple and two caps,drill a couple of holes in one of the caps and screw them on loose.Fill with cases put them in the furnace and forget for a few hours,dead soft jackets. Frank C.

  4. #44
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    So my dad makes custom knives and has a furnace that clears 2100F. It has a rather sophisticated temperature control. If I want him to anneal these for me, what are ideal temps and dwell times?
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  5. #45
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    I run my kiln up to 1,250 degrees with the brass, with cores installed, in the kiln. I turn it off and let it set unattended overnight. About 12 hours later it's still over 250 degrees inside the kiln when I open the door. The brass is annealed and the cores are melted inside them.

    There are some pictures in Post #24.

    Hope this helps.

    Fred

  6. #46
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    IMOP once the entire brass case glows you are good and any longer is over kill. However long that takes via torch, BBQ, or Kiln or oven and you should be good to go!

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  7. #47
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    Brian, my friend BadLuther (whom you have sold some swaging dies to) left his entire annealing system here with me. It's a copy of your system, with the bbq grill, white bricks, same basket, etc............ I have a great system now for annealing. Thanks for making him do it!


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  8. #48
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    Sure thing

    Very nice of him.

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  9. #49
    How about electrical resistance based annealing?



    It's a transformer that I re-wound for use in a spot welder. I'm controlling it with a switch in the video, but it can be controlled precisely with a timer or an IR sensor could be used to shut it off when the case reaches a specific temperature.

  10. #50
    FYI: clicking on the image takes you to a video...

  11. #51
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    Awesome! Looks great for annealing the necks. You think you can get an entire 40 S&W case to glow?

    Is this the method you use for you rifle brass? How have teh results been? It certainly looks great.

    Good work!

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  12. #52
    No, I anneal my necks this way:
    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...95#post1331195

    I could make a similar jig for doing bullet jackets...

    I played with ressitance for annealing the necks, but the problem is that the highest resistance area will heat first. So, if you don't have perfect contact with the case neck, it over-anneals certain points. I don't think it's as big of an issue when you're annealing bullet jackets though...

    It could do the entire case if you put the contact points at the top and bottom of the case. The trick is to just make sure that the case is the highest resistance element in the system. You definitely don't want it to have a lower resistance than you wires, which is why you need to use heavy gauge ones.

  13. #53
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    That's some good stuff kombayotch!

    For jackets I'm thinking flat copper plates on a clamp, parallel to each other,
    clamp case with mouth and base on the plates, apply voltage.
    (Copper less resistance than brass?)
    When using a propane torch the heat spreads through the whole case,
    I imagine once any part starts glowing you could shut off the current.

    Just make sure the primers are dead!

  14. #54
    Here is a list of conductivity and resistivity values for copper and it's alloys:
    http://www.ndt-ed.org/GeneralResourc...ity_Copper.pdf

    Yes, it is lower for copper. Cross-sectional area also plays a role in relative resistivity...

    Just need to find a good strong material that isn't electrically conductive and is able to take the heat to make the rest of the structure out of. Of course, if your plates are large enough, they won't heat up as much. I've used wood isolator elements in spot welders with pretty good success.

    It's very fast; I didn't apply power till just after the 8 second mark in the video. You can hear the transformer hum when it comes on.

  15. #55
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    Try a couple of graphite electrodes that conform to the case for that neck anneal.

    Bore a neck sized hole in a piece of graphite & cut it apart. Should be able to get good heating around the neck that way.

    For those of you considering this for jacket annealing, the low resistance part of the case is the head. You should make contact on the outside of the case at the head, and at the inside of the case head with your other electrode.

    If the heating current passes through the case head, the thinner walls will heat by conduction.

    Trying to pass the current from the thin case mouth all the way to the head will result in overheating the thin case mouth area long before the head gets hot enough for a full anneal.

    B.

  16. #56
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    Ok here are a couple of questions. I was going to try to anneal 9mm cases in a self cleaning oven. How bad is it going to smell? I need to keep peace in the family. Can I fill a cast iron dutch oven with brass and do a good job on all of them? Is the Dutch Oven going to be food safe or retired to the gun room? Should I use a shallow pan instead?

    You guys can save me a lot of experimenting
    Thanks

  17. #57
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    The short answer is that you will not be able to get the brass hot enough in your oven. I anneal my Hybrid jackets by putting 25 to 35, depending upon size, on the small burners on my stove top and covering with a sauce pan used for that purpose only. Turn to high for seven minutes and turn off and let sit for three minutes then do the other burner and remove the annealed cases and put more on that burner and when the other burner has gone through its cycle, repeat.

  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by cgtreml View Post
    Ok here are a couple of questions. I was going to try to anneal 9mm cases in a self cleaning oven. How bad is it going to smell? I need to keep peace in the family. Can I fill a cast iron dutch oven with brass and do a good job on all of them? Is the Dutch Oven going to be food safe or retired to the gun room? Should I use a shallow pan instead?

    You guys can save me a lot of experimenting
    Thanks
    If your oven is gas, like mine, it will do just fine. Most gas ovens "self-clean" at about 900 degrees.

    650 will anneal brass, so your oven should work. I would just lay them on the bottom of the oven , loose, and try not to stack them. The idea is that the oven won't have to heat the dutch oven and then the brass.

    If you can crush the brass mouth easily, after it cools....it is annealed enough to swage.

    There is no smell or fumes to worry about.

  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by randmplumbingllc View Post
    If your oven is gas, like mine, it will do just fine. Most gas ovens "self-clean" at about 900 degrees.

    650 will anneal brass, so your oven should work. I would just lay them on the bottom of the oven , loose, and try not to stack them. The idea is that the oven won't have to heat the dutch oven and then the brass.

    If you can crush the brass mouth easily, after it cools....it is annealed enough to swage.

    There is no smell or fumes to worry about.
    Thanks. We are supposed to get a hard frost this week so I will give it a try. First try will be with a couple of hundred 9mms. Will post the results. One way or another we will all learn something. By the way ours is electric. Worst that can happen is the oven is clean for thanksgiving.

  20. #60
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    The best inexpensive and fast way to do it is an ordinary fireplace or an old unused grill just in my case.
    I managed to anneal 10kg (16 000 pcs approx) in 3 hours period.
    I was lucky just 4 of them fired


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