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  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Today, 09:24 AM
    The thing that puzzled me was that the separation came in the middle of the case, which isn't the usual place. It might be that the case was engaging with pitting or other damage in the chamber. Maybe someone in the past had used a rat-tail file. ...
    33 replies | 1370 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Today, 08:51 AM
    Within those size limitations, apart from having an out of work .35 barrel blank, there is a lot going for the .445 Super Magnum, which is basically a .44 Magnum given the same treatment as the .357 Maximum, at 1.61in. case length. I don't know...
    21 replies | 655 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Today, 06:34 AM
    A teacup with a storm in it indeed. But if it bothers you, go to a firm that applies your photograph to the cake, and the system is unlikely to detect anything you choose to write. I don't know about eBay USA, but in the UK you can even get them...
    11 replies | 389 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-20-2018, 06:53 PM
    Pietro's suggestion does sound the most likely, although of course only if it is located under the rimfire firing-pin. Brownells used to market a device for curing this condition with a .22 although I think it was expensive and/or discontinued, and...
    13 replies | 282 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-20-2018, 09:19 AM
    The first gun I ever owned without air coming into it, was a 9mm. Webley garden gun, which is actually a slightly smaller calibre than that sounds. I have several pounds weight of Fiocchi cases, primed but never loaded, which I bought in an auction...
    11 replies | 482 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-20-2018, 05:32 AM
    You wouldn't. But the problem of patching the ball is a little more than it is with a muzzle-loader, in which the ball tightens the patch around itself as it goes down, which suggests less danger of being blown out of it on the way up. Wrapping some...
    58 replies | 1547 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-19-2018, 07:01 PM
    That must be a calibre less used in straight cases than just about any other. It is very rare for anyone to actually need a wildcat cartridge, but there is a little-known .35/.30-30 Winchester that is about as practical as I can think of, for...
    21 replies | 655 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-15-2018, 12:26 PM
    Nor many people would give raw egg or oiy sardines to a dog with Lanty's whiskers, and regular steak is a bit much, when he likes toasted cheddar just as much. But my wife got a deeply coveted job in January, and Lanty got his own personal steak...
    67 replies | 2428 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-15-2018, 11:23 AM
    Well, my wife is German, and she has more non-antique shotguns than I do. I tend to think of Colonel Fremantle on the field of Gettysburg - although I've got his book, and he had neither red coat, teacup nor official position. Talking of civil war...
    30 replies | 901 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-14-2018, 05:57 PM
    That is an encouraging start, but an instructive test requires no firearm, just a piece of squared paper, 52 squares by 52. Instead of buying some you could draw and print it with the draw utility in MS Word. Number the columns 1 to 52, and the...
    13 replies | 308 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-14-2018, 05:47 PM
    This isn't unusual, with various types of slug. The trouble is that groups at 100, with any kind of smoothbore projectile, tend to be a lot more than twice as big. I also think the slight spin a rifled slug can achieve arises in the air, and not...
    30 replies | 901 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-14-2018, 05:42 PM
    I don't think Longbow's or the FBI/DOJ's judgements would surprise anybody with a serious interest in the subject. A spirally grooved slug can indeed spin, but to an extent that can't possibly stabilise it. Archers did indeed discover the ...
    30 replies | 901 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-14-2018, 02:43 PM
    One reason for that is that websites like eBay, where you can see the individual piece of leather illustrated, blew them away. I don't think they make boots thick enough for an all-leather sheath. You can buy a sort of miniature plane with a...
    30 replies | 740 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-14-2018, 02:18 PM
    Those are good recommendations, but there is a lot to be said for an air hardening steel, such as A2 or D2 (or possibly A-2 or D-2 in searches), which should simplify the heat treatment process. Not all of the single shot actions require heat...
    13 replies | 405 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-14-2018, 04:39 AM
    The trouble with these conversions is that they have been done by different people, at different times. They have a reputation of being dangerous with the .45ACP load, but I think this applies mainly to GI hardball. Unlike the break-open Smith and...
    13 replies | 308 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-14-2018, 04:21 AM
    Huntingsgr8's revolver is very much like the one with which, in .450 calibre, Henry Webley did a demonstration in front of press witnesses in 1884. In fact it might have been the 2½in. Metropolitan Police model. At nine yards he placed five shots in...
    13 replies | 308 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-13-2018, 06:54 PM
    Now that is interesting! My Dutch revolver is the small version of their 1873, made for private purchase by officers by JFJ Bar of Delft. It came with grips which were also of probably US air force plexiglass, rather cruder in design and clear,...
    11 replies | 329 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-13-2018, 11:57 AM
    It still looks off-centre to me, and I would also suspect something home-made. it could be true that there is no evidence of firing, for someone who didn't reload could have replaced the shot in unfired cartridges. In general paper cases simplify...
    12 replies | 433 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-13-2018, 10:00 AM
    Yes, I approve of Jantz Supplies, whom I found very good on overseas orders. You will probably find some of the same products cheaper on eBay, and a very wide selection of woods etc. with a search for "knifemaking scales". I have found O1 steel...
    30 replies | 740 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-13-2018, 09:02 AM
    Filing a court order to exclude guns from what amounts to history seems a bit silly. But the book is fiction, and the rest of the Civics class probably had something to say about the sort of countries where a military court can impost an original...
    19 replies | 702 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-13-2018, 05:06 AM
    As a very great generalisation, subject to exceptions, deficiencies in accuracy caused by the rifle make 50 yard groups half the size of 100 yard ones, a tenth the size of 500 yard ones, and so on. They often spread the group in a particular...
    29 replies | 906 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-13-2018, 04:31 AM
    That looks like a fine piece of work. The Baker was about as good a compromise design as a pre-fulminate and pre-Minié could get. The longer-barrelled and smaller-calibre Kentucky rifles held certain advantages, but probably fouled even faster. ...
    13 replies | 439 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-13-2018, 03:10 AM
    I am always reminded of Rutherford the nuclear scientist, who was asked in his old age "These... electrons... of yours... hoa do you know they actually exist?" "Exist? Exist? I can see them, I tell you!" Well he couldn't, and like him we have to...
    11 replies | 329 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-12-2018, 03:49 PM
    I think excessive headspace is likely to produce an unusually sharp edge around the perimeter of the primer, or extrude it slightly into the pocket's bevelled edge, especially if the bevel is exceptionally large. But I can't see how headspace would...
    21 replies | 734 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-12-2018, 03:44 PM
    If it didn't have an inertial firing-pin I would say the pressure of the firing-pin is involved, probably in combination with wear on the extractor hook or the snapcap rim - very likely both - to form inclined planes to make the extractor rise under...
    11 replies | 329 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-12-2018, 05:26 AM
    I don't think that is due to excessive pressure at all. The usual way that goes wrong is by detaching the depression, altogether or in part, around the edge of the depression. What you have sounds like a firing-pin problem that can occur at about...
    21 replies | 734 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-10-2018, 09:50 AM
    I agree about pistols, and most pistol-cartridge rifles. Except in the comparative sense. When your load produces primer deformation comparable with the one produced by a load you know is acceptable, in the same firearm, you are on pretty safe...
    21 replies | 734 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-10-2018, 09:32 AM
    This is a very extreme example, not perpetrated by me, of a primer cratered in an attempt to develop an Improved version of the already huge .244 Holland and Holland Magnum. Note that the necessary pressure imprinted the ejector slot on the case...
    21 replies | 734 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-10-2018, 03:30 AM
    Very occasionally nowadays. Like gunsmithing and many another thing, the amateur, who doesn't cost up his time, can take several times longer than someone who has to make a living at it. Not only is it hard to keep the spine of a double-edged blade...
    23 replies | 950 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-09-2018, 06:08 PM
    This is all good advice. "Can you tell me a good load... " is generally a bad question when asked of non-accountable strangers. You won't get bad advice all the time, perhaps very seldom, but how often do you need? As long as there is no acrid...
    9 replies | 967 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-09-2018, 05:42 PM
    I restored an 1840s English straight razor which I'm sure is in nothing very different from 1095 steel, but works about as well as anything you can buy nowadays. But I would about as soon whip my dog as let it touch cardboard, and I have heard of...
    23 replies | 950 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-09-2018, 08:00 AM
    How about the small subculture of people (not, to my amazement, all American) who for no verified physiological advantage trephine their own skulls with holesaws under local anaesthetic? A bit closer to the realms of normality, if pain does...
    42 replies | 2235 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    05-08-2018, 06:26 PM
    It would be a lot more exciting if there were such a thing as free powder to send it anywhere. To see spending money to save money so clearly, you would normally have to be female.
    20 replies | 680 view(s)
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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check