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  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Today, 05:21 AM
    That is an extremely bullet-shaped bullet, but on game probably doesn't tend to go club-headed as one with a wide meplat will do. I don't think Lyman #2 alloy would be bad, but agree that less antimony would be a good idea, and quite harmless with a...
    22 replies | 637 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:41 AM
    The suppressor or silencer was developed around the same time as they were for the internal combustion engine, and there are three main reasons why they were seldom or never used by the few diehards who still used muzzle loaders at that time....
    21 replies | 349 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:00 AM
    Thurlow Craig, my favourite author on shooting, fishing, cowboying, animal behaviour and South American revolutions, recalls returning home hot and tired at night, and gulping what he thought was a glass of water, left out by his Paraguay cook. It...
    24 replies | 679 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:51 AM
    John M. Browning designed far in excess of black powder requirements, enough for some extremely useful and practical high velocity smokeless loads, which I have no qualms about using in my original .40-82. But nothing exceeds like excess. I...
    27 replies | 1101 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:30 AM
    You have had some good advice on alloys. Antimony is cheaper than tin, so it is used in wheel weights on a scale that makes bullets brittle. Also any large hollow is going to make any bullet likely to shed its point. Here is one that I feel almost...
    22 replies | 637 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:42 AM
    That is a disappointment. There are surely high-temperature synthetic rubbers, but a sandwich of inner tube rubber might well do better. It might be that the flange of the steel "mushroom" has eroded, and is allowing excessive access of gas to the...
    109 replies | 16557 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-23-2018, 05:57 PM
    For questions like this a piece of old-fashioned graph paper and a pencil can be useful.
    17 replies | 262 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-23-2018, 11:26 AM
    I think the "at the feet" part is exaggeration, but let's not dwell too much on detail. This British Baker rifle target (like the Intelligence Corps, which didn't have any privates) used to be known as "The Eunuchs" I can't think why, can you? ...
    109 replies | 16557 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-23-2018, 09:39 AM
    I once saw a prisoner of war movie where a guard is trying to make civilised conversation about his home in Hamburg and a British pilot said "Yes, I believe it is a beautiful city. A lot of open space... " Most British people would consider that a...
    42 replies | 1061 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-23-2018, 08:56 AM
    You might find someone makes an off-the-peg mould for .318 bullets, for the J-bore version of the 8x57, and even a lubesizer die would be cheaper than a custom mould. Or you could make a simple die. The cheapest way of getting a .315in. reamer is...
    38 replies | 649 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-22-2018, 05:16 AM
    Ah, Neuschwanstein, as copied by Walt Disney! Ludwig was unquestionably as cracked as the Liberty Bell, but probably not certifiably insane by modern standards. He built castles from his own fortune and irresponsible borrowing, not tax revenue. The...
    42 replies | 1061 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-21-2018, 02:17 PM
    Sliding down fairly easily works well with medium-hard, heavy-bullet and heavily-charged .450 long-range rifles. That bullet might be a little longer, which I think is what controls upsetting (weight of lead compared with cross-section), but I am...
    38 replies | 649 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-21-2018, 06:23 AM
    I think there is a pretty good chance that a land diameter bullet would expand if it wasn't too hard. But a grooveless bullet would probably be better. Imagine the opposite, stretching a piece of rubber rod with grooves in it. Most of the stretching...
    38 replies | 649 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-21-2018, 06:04 AM
    Lawns are overrated. I like them best when they are long enough to see gusts of wind moving across them. I think it would give less than 120psi pressure until there was more resistance than a bullet would give. The usual mechanism was a hammer...
    10 replies | 456 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-21-2018, 05:49 AM
    File steel is some of the best for making knives, wood chisels etc. But the file-making process can leave cracks or some other form of weakness deeper than the teeth look to go. Belt-sanding that little bit deeper is a good idea. I have refreshed...
    46 replies | 1249 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-18-2018, 11:20 AM
    It is puzzling to know why there are so many bad files around. 1095 steel isn't an expensive material for the bulk buyer - probably cheaper than the quick and easy forms of case-hardening - and about as good as anything for straight razors, which...
    46 replies | 1249 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-18-2018, 09:46 AM
    I know how it is. I think the sphere reservoirs were often of copper, and I would guess that they were thick, made of two hemispheres with an interlocking flange, and silver soldered together. I believe they had a valve so that they could be...
    10 replies | 456 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-18-2018, 05:38 AM
    Yes, gasoline and various common solvents, or their vapour, are liable to come sneaking out looking for trouble, while powder stays where it is put. Gasoline combines with the oxygen from about nine times its weight in air too, so a pound of it...
    38 replies | 1042 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-16-2018, 07:48 AM
    I think the difference with cans lies in the metal being intensely but momentarily heated by stress. Think of the heat generated by bending a pieceof wire to and fro till it breaks, being concentrated in a single millisecond with no chance to be...
    38 replies | 1042 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-15-2018, 02:42 PM
    I don't claim to know much about electricity. I've never seen any, but it can be in there, invisible, waiting to leap out and zap you. I have, however, tried at great length to ignite individual powder grains, with the piezo-electric unit from a...
    38 replies | 1042 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-12-2018, 01:34 PM
    Hammer lift is indeed progressive, but it shouldn't require replacement anything like every ten shots with any kind of nipple. Admittedly it will erode a lot faster than the bore, and yet black powder rifle bores wouldn't last anything like as well...
    41 replies | 2332 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-12-2018, 08:53 AM
    That sight on the bayonet (solid I think, rather than dovetailed) was Austro-Hungarian. I don't remember which rifle in a time when Europe was so full of empires that couldn't afford to turn their backs on each other, that successive rearmaments...
    13 replies | 569 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-12-2018, 08:25 AM
    It should be very strong and resilient, but there is a quality that is hard to assess when you simply have a piece of it. There is a very good article on unconventional stock woods in "The NRA Gunsmithing Guide Updated". (It is an excellent...
    30 replies | 881 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    04-12-2018, 07:51 AM
    Yes, and the military Martini is unnecessarily wide, to accommodate its large cartridge, which is both difficult to load well with smokeless powders, and is very expensive in components and dies. I wish someone had made a Martini action a little...
    34 replies | 7965 view(s)
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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check