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  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Today, 05:56 AM
    Ah, now that is interesting. I hadn't realised the standard Murata used a mainspring in the bolt handle. It comes back to me that the only time I ever saw one, thirty years ago and very briefly, I wondered what the screw in the end of the lever was...
    14 replies | 381 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Today, 05:03 AM
    Most things that can go wrong with a firearm don't go wrong first shot. That doesn't mean that if you get away with something for a while, it isn't that bad. It means it isn't that good. There are two kinds of mechanical failure. One is due to...
    12 replies | 162 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Today, 05:02 AM
    Most things that can go wrong with a firearm don't go wrong first shot. That doesn't mean that if you get away with something for a while, it isn't that bad. It means it isn't that good. There are two kinds of mechanical failure. One is due to...
    12 replies | 162 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:10 PM
    I agree with the people who say that as far as increased volume and performance are concerned, it would make no worthwhile difference - certainly nothing worth the reamer and dies. Improved cases are usually considered to extract more easily, and...
    14 replies | 245 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:32 PM
    If you are prepared to modify a rifle, you would surely be better off with 9mm. rimfire shotshells, which are still available from Fiocchi - and that t uisn't like the various obsolete centrefires which are so described in reference books, just...
    3 replies | 109 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:58 PM
    I don't know what Major Murata's improvements were, but the Type 13 and Type 18 rifles (the year in the modernising Emperor Meiji's reign, making the Type 18 a model of 1885) was closely modelled on the French Gras. It was a time when the Japanese,...
    14 replies | 381 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:11 AM
    No blood or pieces of gun? That's good. This really is a dangerous thing to do.atwhere it will happen most. It is a lot more solidly clenched together than a bowl of shot you can stick your finger in. It is highly likely that the shot will sometimes...
    12 replies | 162 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:33 AM
    I've seen a little felt cylinder for use on a Dremel tool used. They have a little hole for a screw mandrel, which can be used to screw on a piece of card to stick up into the sight line and remind you. But I think it would take an oil-soaked patch...
    33 replies | 1295 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    06-22-2017, 05:52 AM
    They are complex, but perhaps more symmetrical than some. Cubes are totally so, and may indeed experience no appreciable shape distortion, although I wouldn't have excluded possibly negligible convexity of the surfaces. But it is a physical...
    28 replies | 1631 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    06-22-2017, 05:12 AM
    Something very odd happened last night. Lanty Hanlon the Irish terrier loves TV, maybe because we have LED screens now, as few dogs did in the days of the scanning cathode ray tube. I don't think he distinguishes fighting from boisterous play, in...
    55 replies | 1436 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    06-22-2017, 04:42 AM
    That is even more likely to be true if it happened with a muzzle-loader than a breech-loader. Terminal pressure is likely to be lower, and the barrel walls near the breech are likely to be thinner relative to those at the muzzle. I think you would...
    33 replies | 1295 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    06-21-2017, 06:05 AM
    I have a fine little Falling Block (HW 28) that has a loose section about 2-3 inches long about mid barrel. Explain that other than manufacturing flaw. QUOTE] It's none too easily explained by a manufacturing flaw either. I think the most...
    33 replies | 1295 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    06-21-2017, 05:54 AM
    Experimental evidence now proves that localised ring bulges are caused by a gas pressure wave, when the bullet hits an obstruction solid enough to make it decelerate. Paul Vieille, the inventor of smokeless rifle powder, ignited powder at one...
    33 replies | 1295 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    06-20-2017, 03:37 PM
    , I think you'd be right about making some kind of fine dog - perhaps even an adult individual which has been not only bred as a fighting dog or ferocious guard, but owned by humans who deserve to be microchipped, tattooed, muzzled and neutered?...
    55 replies | 1436 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    06-19-2017, 05:59 AM
    The trouble is, it can include treatment before it is born. It is certainly possible to have irreformably aggressive strains, if they are bred for the purpose, or for looks at any price. For sixteen years American pit bulls have been banned in the...
    55 replies | 1436 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    06-19-2017, 03:53 AM
    Yes, the .577 chambering seems likely enough. I am sure it isn't a British military Sharps, unless some gunmaker used a stripped action. All I know of those were round-barrelled carbines with three grooves and the Maynard tape primer which was soon...
    14 replies | 712 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    06-18-2017, 03:22 PM
    As did my childhood labrador, at 8 I think, and a sample of one doesn't prove much. The last thing boxers need is the breed going extinct, or the gene pool becoming too limited to put anything right, because people are scared to take a chance on...
    55 replies | 1436 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    06-18-2017, 09:11 AM
    You may have better strains of boxer in the US than in the UK. Here they have a startling range of hereditary illnesses, including a high rate of epilepsy, over 20% of puppies dying, and twice as many adults dying from cancer as from old age. ...
    55 replies | 1436 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    06-18-2017, 06:57 AM
    It depends who you are selling it to. With all such repairs, much of the labour may be in getting the inside of the crack really clean, especially if it has been that way a long time. With really clean but rough surfaces the situation seems pretty...
    24 replies | 931 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    06-18-2017, 06:48 AM
    The shape of the 100 yard holes is worth checking, and considerably further if your range permits. I don't believe it is rifling twist or velocity. 20in. twist and heavier bullets were routinely used with long range black powder rifles in the...
    20 replies | 746 view(s)
  • Ballistics in Scotland's Avatar
    06-18-2017, 05:41 AM
    It would if you held the bullet in a collet, including a specially made one from one of the soft steel Morse taper mandrels you can buy. Few drill chucks are quite as concentric as is desirable for this job. I'd prefer metal to wood to hold the...
    60 replies | 9151 view(s)
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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check