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RogerDat
07-31-2017, 12:33 PM
What is the most cost effective way to ship brass? How best to package it so it all arrives... without leaving a trail of brass "breadcrumbs" behind out of a split box or envelope. I understand USPS won't take the tyvek envelopes more than 1/4 inch thick so that seems out these days. So what is an economical way to ship brass? SFRB seems expensive and limits quantity unless one goes with a medium box. And maybe some sort of internal packaging?

I have some brass, I'm thinking of selling it, and find at best maybe 120 fit into a SFRB which seems to me would be adding 5 cents per case to the cost just for shipping, without benefit to buyer or seller. Be nice if there was a way to get that shipping cost down. Any suggestions?

Efin
07-31-2017, 12:40 PM
I've bought numerous boxes packed double and others with the tyvex bags packed 1/2 full and several stuffed in a Medium box, also zip lock bags in a well taped box.
The fibered tape also seems to hold well, taping all edges and sometimes the entire box.

Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk

dverna
07-31-2017, 12:46 PM
I normally buy brass in large flat rate boxes and have never had a problem. I think any type of box that is taped well will survive USPS handling.

I have shipped small quantities of brass in the small FRB and never had never had a complaint.

William Yanda
07-31-2017, 12:49 PM
I question the USPS not taking tyvek envelopes over 1/4 inch thick. I have packaged stainless steel Revere double boilers, wrapped in bubble wrap inside tyvek envelopes for shipping with no questions from the postal service.

dragon813gt
07-31-2017, 12:49 PM
Tyvek envelopes inside flat rate boxes. The tyvek is the important part. The USPS has envelopes to use for this purpose and they don't cost you anything just like the flat rate boxes.

RustyReel
07-31-2017, 01:04 PM
Tyvek envelopes inside flat rate boxes. The tyvek is the important part. The USPS has envelopes to use for this purpose and they don't cost you anything just like the flat rate boxes.

What he said. I always try to use the tyvek inside the frb's. Simply based on weight I think you will find the frb's are the most cost effective method, especially when you factor in tracking and insurance. Don't forget the regional boxes for when you have a little too much for a sfrb but not enough to justify the cost of a mfrb. Usually cheaper than the mfrbs.

For small quantities, ie 20 pieces of brass, they usually don't justify the cost of shipping by any method unless it is a rare caliber. YMMV

mozeppa
07-31-2017, 01:11 PM
what they are all saying...multiple tyvek bags INSIDE a medium flat rate box.

tyvek is indestructible!...even by usps standards!

Dusty Bannister
07-31-2017, 01:19 PM
For small flat rate boxes, I like the clear tape to completely enclose the box. For medium flat rate boxes, I have a roll of plastic and use a double layer inside the box to fold over. It is best to add cardboard or foam to make a tight hard box for shipping to avoid crush damage. Then wrap the entire box with clear shipping tape, and a few wraps of fiber reinforced tape if brass or lead is being shipped.

Is anyone else having trouble finding the large rolls of this tape in their local stores?

JasonYbarbo
07-31-2017, 01:26 PM
Mine come in taped and wrapped.

RGrosz
07-31-2017, 01:41 PM
I've only got a couple of orders of brass from the site. Once was a med flat rate box that had the brass inside a tied garbage bag wrapped so there was tape on all seams. the other was a small flat rate box and the brass was in zip lock bags and the box was once again wrapped with tape covering all seams. They both arrived with all cartages intact although that boxes showed some wear.
Rob

blltsmth
07-31-2017, 01:43 PM
Dusty Bannister: Have been finding my fiberglass tape on evil bay! Twice the amount you get if you buy someplace like office max!!

edwardware
07-31-2017, 01:49 PM
Tyvek bagged in Med or Large FR USPS boxes. . . and all the packing supplies other than tape are free. Order from USPS online.

I've never seen brass valuable enough to bother shipping less than a MFRB.

Hardcast416taylor
07-31-2017, 01:56 PM
The size of the box being used is where you `Bite the bullet` as far as shipping. How you pack the `innerds` is up to you.Robert

corbinace
07-31-2017, 01:57 PM
Two tiered answer to the two questions.

As others have said, securely contained inside the outer box.

I also add another shipping label secured to the inner parcel, just in case it gets completely out of the outer box.

Completely fill all voids inside the outer box, if shipping flat rate. I often use plywood or dimensional lumber to stiffen or fill the FR boxes. I have gotten many complements on my packaging. Heavy odd shapes have even gotten spray foam with the article inside a garbage bag. Any movement inside the outer box is bad.

Go hog wild with the tape.

To the second Question, It is not always the USPS that has the best price. Sometimes the distance and parcel dimensions will make UPS or FEDEX less expensive.

btreanor
07-31-2017, 02:02 PM
I always use the USPS tyvek envelopes inside the USPS boxes because they are FREE. Also, look into using the USPS Regional Rate "A" boxes because postage is less expensive than a MFRB and often about the same price as the SFRB.

whtsmoke
07-31-2017, 02:16 PM
I like to vacuum seal the brass and then donate some of my shredded mail for padding in a SFRB.

durango
07-31-2017, 02:23 PM
Don't forget the padded flat rate envelopes-same price as SFRBs. You can get two SFRBs into an envelope. I just shipped 56 lbs. of lead in this manner! I'm guessing that if shipping small brass, a couple Tyvek envelopes inside the padded envelope will be real close to the MFRB for the price of a SFRB.

rondog
07-31-2017, 03:19 PM
Yeah, tyvek inside the frb. I bought a 1000 pistol cases once, they were just dumped in a lfrb and taped shut. It busted open at some Postal facility, they swept up all the spilled brass and put it back in, taped it up, and sent it on. But they also swept up all the rubber bands, paper scraps, candy wrappers, and whatever else was on the floor with the brass. Friggin' government employees.....

atr
07-31-2017, 04:32 PM
I send mine this way:
zip lock bags...taped to prevent opening,,,then in a USPS box with all edges taped double...
atr

imashooter2
07-31-2017, 04:44 PM
The bubble envelopes are very rugged. Tyvek bag inside the flat rate bubble wrap envelope and it will get where it is going. Use a marker to write the address. Don't try to tape on a label.

FISH4BUGS
07-31-2017, 04:46 PM
I have shipped lots of cast bullets. I pack them DOUBLE in those Tyvek envelopes. I stuff the MFRB boxes with newspapers to take up the slack.
Brass gets shipped the same way. Use the nylon reinforced tape on all the corners and edges. Never had a problem. I think the MFRB is the most cost effective way to ship 1000+ brass.

RogerDat
07-31-2017, 05:26 PM
Don't forget the padded flat rate envelopes-same price as SFRBs. You can get two SFRBs into an envelope. I just shipped 56 lbs. of lead in this manner! I'm guessing that if shipping small brass, a couple Tyvek envelopes inside the padded envelope will be real close to the MFRB for the price of a SFRB.

Where does one get the flat rate padded envelopes, I never see those with the other flat rate boxes etc. But that sounds like the way to go for "in between" orders of the larger sizes of rifle brass. SFRB is fine for pistol or even 223, 7.62 x 39 or 300 black out, not so good for 30-06, or other longer necked rifle rounds. Just too much shipping overhead, buyer is paying extra and seller is getting less.

Most of the time I sell my extra brass to a vendor at the local gun show. A lot of the time he is paying within one or two cents +/- of going rate here in the forum but there is no shipping overhead (or packaging hassle). And he can inspect, so it takes assessment of condition off of me. That is why I don't sell that much brass here. I took 14# of brass to him last show, essentially traded brass for powder and primers from him.

Right now I'm looking at too much stuff and not much chance I'll get to a gun show anytime soon. So I appreciate the suggestions and ideas on shipping it. Really would be nice if one could ship a couple of SFRB worth in a single padded envelope for close to the same shipping price. Essentially turn coffee cans of brass I won't use into cash which I will use.

RogerDat
07-31-2017, 05:30 PM
PS. used plastic shopping bags work better than newspaper, news print can compress and stay compressed but plastic bags wadded up are "springy" which allows a bit more pressure and less inclined to compress and become less tightly packed. I got that idea from someone here and it seems to work well.

elmacgyver0
07-31-2017, 05:34 PM
PS. used plastic shopping bags work better than newspaper, news print can compress and stay compressed but plastic bags wadded up are "springy" which allows a bit more pressure and less inclined to compress and become less tightly packed. I got that idea from someone here and it seems to work well.

Also a good way to get rid of all those plastic shopping bags!

durango
07-31-2017, 05:54 PM
The padded envelopes are an order item on usps.com. My local PO had about ten behind the counter and I got about eight of them and ordered fifteen more online. My big disappointment for the weekend was to learn that they no longer give away the tape.

Go up to the stickies and read the one about saving money with the usps. Buy your labels/postage through Paypal and get the discount. I shipped my 56 lb. envelopes for $6.50 each.

The stickie is the next to the last one--go to post #31 on the second page.

RogerDat
08-01-2017, 09:10 AM
The padded envelopes are an order item on usps.com. My local PO had about ten behind the counter and I got about eight of them and ordered fifteen more online. My big disappointment for the weekend was to learn that they no longer give away the tape.

Go up to the stickies and read the one about saving money with the usps. Buy your labels/postage through Paypal and get the discount. I shipped my 56 lb. envelopes for $6.50 each.

The stickie is the next to the last one--go to post #31 on the second page.
Thanks!

RogerDat
08-04-2017, 03:55 PM
And I ordered a 15 pack at usps.com in the store -> Shipping Supplies -> Free Supplies
https://store.usps.com/store/browse/category.jsp?categoryId=shipping-supplies

Free supplies are like one or two items down in the left side menu. 15 pack of 9.5 x 12.5 Flat Rate Padded Envelopes for $0 and they don't have to be thin, they only have to seal using the default seal (you can add more tape) and not have any of the folds moved to accommodate an item. Current rate is $7.20 for shipping.

Hot diggity dog, I'm thinking this will be so much more cost effective than SFTB.

Bad Water Bill
12-02-2017, 09:01 AM
So please tell me how you would ship something as small as 100 rounds of 22 hornet brass the cheapest and safest way?

azshtr
12-13-2017, 04:47 PM
My 2 Cents.

Brass -- As previously posted, brass in Tyvek envelopes and tape seams and closing flap then place in padded priority envelope & tape seams and closing flap of padded envelope.
(If placing a sfrb inside the padded envelope I would suggest you tap the corners of the sfrb with a hammer to remove the sharp points of the box)

Lead and Large Qty of Brass that requires a mfrb -- 6 sfrb's will fit in a mfrb without any open space (open space in any shipment is what does most of the damage) Place ingots or brass in each sfrb and tape the closing flap of sfrb: after sfrb's are completed hot glue bottom of the mfrb and cut the glued strip from the close flap of a Tyvek envelope, place the glued strip on the inside portion of the mfrb where the vertical seam is to give this area more support. Place sfrb's inside mfrb hot glue top and then tape outside of mfrb as you would normally.

Grmps
12-13-2017, 05:18 PM
Priority mail padded enverlopes site.

https://store.usps.com/store/product/shipping-supplies/priority-mail-padded-flat-rate-envelope-P_EP14PE

I've had good success packing the brass in 1 padded envelope and taping it into a nice shippable shape then placing that into another padded envelope and adding a little tape.

mister gizmo
12-17-2017, 10:16 PM
It may have been covered before, but don't overlook REGIONAL A and REGIONAL B boxes, both available from the USPS.

I just shipped 250 rifle brass which was too big for a SFRB and too expensive for a MFRB. Regional box fees are based on weight and distance. I shipped two "zones" away for $6.60, far less than a MFRB at twice the cost.

nh7792
12-21-2017, 02:35 PM
Medium flat rate is your best bet for good sized amounts. I use the smaller sized medium regional rate box inside the priority medium box, use cardboard corner pieces to limit the inevitable crushing from being rolled down stairs (Thanks USPS) and then tape the **** out of it, 100% around the box.
(I ship bullets daily and the weight borders on the 70lb limit. 80% of boxes arrived beat to ****, but few if any have missing items)

Ed in North Texas
12-30-2017, 08:51 AM
Just received two SFRBs of boolits. Suggested the seller ship in two SFRBs inside a padded Flat Rate Envelope. Worked great, everything received in great shape at the beginning of the Christmas rush (worst time for parcel handling) and got the two for the price of one SFRB.

I've shipped brass in the Tyvek envelope inside a padded envelope without problems. Have to tape the label on the envelope and boxes because I pre-pay on-line and print the label. Haven't had one fail to arrive yet (probably shouldn't have said that).

Steve Steven
03-19-2018, 05:59 PM
I have a question about shipping in MFRB VIA USPS. Once I shipped a GI 50cal metal ammo can in one of the MFRB, it just barely fit and distorted the box slightly, but the local PO took it and it got to the destination OK. The box didn't close perfectly and one corner of the can cut the inside of the box a bit, I used plenty of fiber tape.

Does anyone have any thoughts on how legal this is and would this be a good idea to use regularly? Would the local PO take them without too much problem?

Just curious.

Steve

RogerDat
03-20-2018, 09:18 AM
I was told if the box is distorted or bulged it can be rejected. I think they mostly care about corners and edges and that the side or top doesn't bulge. For example a pile of brass pushing the middle of the top up in a dome.

Some risk that it could be rejected but on the other hand if they reject it will probably be at the counter not after it gets shipped.

Can you slide the hinge pin out? Remove the lid so the top corner of the box is just that little bit shorter. Shouldn't take much for the recipient to align the hinge and slide the pin back in if it can be slid out fairly easily.

Steve Steven
03-20-2018, 05:22 PM
RogerDat,
Yes I could remove the lid, but the idea was to ship brass in the can. I think you are right, if it gets taken over the counter it should be OK the rest of the way.

I have a lot of cans, I was thinking to get rid of them while I got rid of brass. Trying to get rid of stuff I don't need, 50 years of hoarding!

Steve

tazman
03-23-2018, 10:09 PM
I recently received an order of brass from the other side of the US. It was packed really well and that was a good thing. The sender double boxed it(LFRB) and used really heavy plastic zip lock bags(industrial grade????) inside the boxes. The outside was completely wrapped with packing tape.
I know that sounds like overkill, BUT, the post office managed to tear through the side of both inner and outer boxes, including the packing tape, and put a small cut in one of the plastic bags. The cut in the bag wasn't quite large enough to lose the brass, so it all made it to my address, but it was a near thing.
I don't think you can pack things well enough that the postal service can't find a way to destroy it. And if they can't destroy it, they will simply lose it.

RogerDat
03-25-2018, 11:08 AM
USPS flat rate padded envelope I put an additional tyvek envelope, free from post office inside it with an address, and the brass inside that is in ziplock bags. Which is how I store sorted brass.

I can't seem to get two SFRB's in one of those padded envelopes and still get the flap to fold and seal.

Nit Wit
03-27-2018, 11:06 AM
I agree, you can't beat USPS flat rate. From Maine to Hawaii, same price as in between!
Nit Wit

ticket machine
05-23-2018, 09:09 AM
Before I use the Tyvek bags in a box I use a hot glue gun to glue the box together.

mister gizmo
05-27-2018, 08:49 AM
I think that a lot of people aren't familiar with the USPS website https://www.usps.com/ for their label and packaging needs. You gotta sign up, but that shouldn't be a problem for most. Your delivery postperson might even pic up your outgoing at your house, saving you a trip to the PO.

Every conceivable Priority Mail container, whether flat rate or not, is available for FREE, delivered to your residence.

I hardly use MFRB any more because the Regional A box will hold almost as much AND the price is based on weight and ZIP code. My Regional A boxes often ship for anywhere between $6 and $9. A MFRB is way more costly.
Same way with a Regional B versus a similar FRB.

Jus' sayin ...

Bmi48219
06-12-2018, 09:25 AM
I use USPS Flat Rate boxes a lot. Never a problem until last week. I packed two MFRB's with brass to ship to Albuquerque NM. First I lined boxes with bubble wrap, then brass went into plastic bag, sealed bag and taped box up. I use a lot of reinforced shipping tape, probably cover 70% of the box with it. When done boxes were tight & square with no bulges. One weighed 22 lbs & other was 25 lbs.
Mailed them at local PO no problem. When they arrived in Albuquerque things went downhill fast. The person I mailed the brass to got a Postage Due notice for $91.00. He went to the PO& found out they had enacted a new policy, they would only deliver FRB's that looked the same as the FRB boxes they had on display. No exceptions.
Clearly the packages were mishandled by USPS en route & I'm being penalized for their negligence. The PO refused to budge on the postage due so the brass is on its way back to Fl.
I tried calling USPS but the estimated wait time to speak to someone is 90 + minutes. Filed a complaint on line (the website isn't complaint friendly) and received a 'we're looking into it & will get back to you' email from our FL PO.
The boxes I mailed are pictured below as they looked when the forum member I sent them to went to the Albuquerque PO to try negotiating their release.
The employees at our local PO have always been helpful. Sounds like each PO can make their own policies. If their decision goes against me, my next step is to contact the Regional Postal Inspector. In my opinion, demanding $91.00 additional to deliver the two boxes is plain old extortion.

221979

RogerDat
06-18-2018, 06:31 PM
I had one lady tell me my SFRB was not acceptable due to all the strapping tape on the edges and corners, along with being covered with clear tape. I printed off the instructions from the USPS web site where it specifically recommends taping edges and corners and covering label with clear tape to protect it. She accepted them after that.

Only thing I can suggest is look for the directions on taping boxes and reference that. It does state that the FRB has to be in the original size and dimensions and can't be altered or bulging out. But those look like the were "altered" by the post office smashing them. Might want to re-package and submit picture of fresh package to show how the looked when they were sent. I would suggest the strapping tape wrapped only on edges, along flap seam and maybe one across middle and the rest use clear tape.

One technique I found works for me is I run the tape along the edge and let it stick out at both ends about an inch or so. Then use a razor knife to slit the tape that hangs off the end in line with the seam tape is folded over so I can fold those end flaps of tape over. I think it holds better with the ends anchored and gives a clean line when the other seams are taped over the flaps.

Bubble wrap imparts no real strength. Packed with tightly stuffed plastic shopping bags from grocery store will provide more protection from collapse. As will cutting a second box in half at two opposing vertical corners and trimming 3/8 inch off the ends of all the flaps and sides so one box just fits inside the other. I do that for lead.

I'm thinking your best hope is a before picture you create now to go with the after picture. The returned package has a weight and if the contents are moved to new package it will have the same weight providing further proof to the post office inspector that workers basically smashed your box which was fine when it left.

Ironnewt
08-11-2018, 06:57 PM
Small amounts, small frb, padded as needed. Larger amounts, sealed plastic bags (bag in bag) then double taped frb. I have never had an issue. Hope this helps.

Arnie
08-19-2018, 07:31 PM
I had two bags of once fired Norma brass sent to me from Sweden .One made it to my house and the other was confiscated in Chicago by Homeland Security because they said it had primers in the package .Dumb ***** couldn't understand that they were fired and inert .Never did get them back .

Ironnewt
11-29-2018, 02:29 PM
Yeah, tyvek inside the frb. I bought a 1000 pistol cases once, they were just dumped in a lfrb and taped shut. It busted open at some Postal facility, they swept up all the spilled brass and put it back in, taped it up, and sent it on. But they also swept up all the rubber bands, paper scraps, candy wrappers, and whatever else was on the floor with the brass. Friggin' government employees.....

At least they didn't send you the empty box.

Kimber1911
12-23-2018, 12:02 PM
I usually use ziplock inside a flat rate box and tape well. Seems to work.

rondog
11-22-2019, 04:58 AM
Does the USPS still offer the Regional boxes? Just read about them here, but can't find them on the USPS web site.

LeadHead72
11-22-2019, 08:28 PM
Does the USPS still offer the Regional boxes? Just read about them here, but can't find them on the USPS web site.

I just looked and they're still there:
Regional A1 - https://store.usps.com/store/product/shipping-supplies/priority-mail-regional-rate-box-a1-P_RRB_A1
Regional B1 - https://store.usps.com/store/product/shipping-supplies/priority-mail-regional-rate-box-b1-P_RRB_B1

RogerDat
11-25-2019, 01:16 PM
So the regional work better if the weight is lower? Such as brass etc. Because I doubt they will ship 63 lbs. of lead for less than $13 of a MFRB but am willing to try something else if it would save money.

LeadHead72
11-25-2019, 01:59 PM
So the regional work better if the weight is lower? Such as brass etc. Because I doubt they will ship 63 lbs. of lead for less than $13 of a MFRB but am willing to try something else if it would save money.

Regional "A" boxes ship up to 15 lbs, and Regional "B" boxes go up to 20 lbs. If you're shipping something heavy like lead they won't likely be a good option, but for lighter items (including brass) they can save you several dollars.

rondog
11-26-2019, 04:11 PM
These Regional boxes, can anybody use them? Or do you have to have a Commercial account? Got some sample boxes from a counter guy, but he didn't know anything about the Regional stuff. I'm still trying to find out what the "regions" are.....

LeadHead72
11-26-2019, 05:27 PM
These Regional boxes, can anybody use them? Or do you have to have a Commercial account? Got some sample boxes from a counter guy, but he didn't know anything about the Regional stuff. I'm still trying to find out what the "regions" are.....

No commercial account needed. Just go to www.usps.com and create a free personal account. You can then pay/print labels online without the hassle of standing in line at the P.O. You can also order all sorts of free shipping supplies, including those regional boxes and padded mailers, and your mail carrier will deliver them to your door. Doesn't get much more convenient! I've been using this service for a few years, now, and it really is a time-saver.

LeadHead72
11-26-2019, 05:30 PM
Oh, and when you order supplies make sure you order a couple of bundles of the Tyvek envelopes, too.
https://store.usps.com/store/product/shipping-supplies/priority-mail-tyvek-envelope-ep14-P_EP_14
These are very tough and tear-resistant and are great for bagging your brass before putting it in the shipping box.

DukeInFlorida
12-06-2019, 12:16 AM
I have been shipping brass, when I do ship it, in the USPS Priority MailŪ Padded Flat Rate Envelope
9-1/2" x 12-1/2" They cost $8 to ship, and are VERY STRONG. You can even double pack them, no weight limit. No need to tape more than the flap shut, and the label to the envelope (easier to tape the label on the envelope on before filling with brass).

One clerk at the post office asked me if they were "shells" because I am near the beach just south of Daytona. Yup, I said with a smile..... shells......

Have shipped them absolutely bulging with brass, and never a complaint. They seem to be a combo of Tyvek and bubble wrap, and FREE from good old USPS. You can pick up a few from any Post Office, but I prefer to order them by the case, delivered free to my home. Here's the item:
https://store.usps.com/store/product/shipping-supplies/priority-mail-padded-flat-rate-envelope-P_EP14PE

There are 100 in a case, so if you order the 10 pack, and order the ten max packs of that, they ship you the whole case, free.

rondog
02-12-2020, 01:06 PM
I tend to overpack brass, I've had too many instances where the box arrived mangled and brass was missing. I pack 'em so tough now that the USPS manglers will really have to work at it.

Oh, and when I think about it, I like to put a second label INSIDE the box, just in case the outside one gets destroyed somehow. It happens, and often.

alamogunr
02-12-2020, 01:45 PM
I've bought a lot of OF brass. Most came in MFR boxes. Also most was enclosed in doubled plastic grocery type bags and any empty space filled with same or newspaper.

I wish anyone shipping stuff from S&S would read this or similar threads that have appeared over the years. While most things I have bought here were well packed, a few left a lot to be desired. Recently received one that an edge not taped had torn out and loose boxes inside fractured and lost some product.

A year or so ago I bought an extra Redding turret from a well know vendor. The turret was place in the bottom of a box that allowed it to move around and the only packing was loosely on top of the turret. There were a few small items ordered at the same time still in the box but the turret was long gone.

RogerDat
02-17-2020, 04:25 PM
I tend to overpack....

Oh, and when I think about it, I like to put a second label INSIDE the box, just in case the outside one gets destroyed somehow. It happens, and often.You can't over pack, no such animal. Unless I guess you only used packing material and no content.

The second shipping label information inside is a good idea. If the outside label gets damaged, or the box gets totally mangled the post office will check the contents for information on where to ship it. If one is using the tyvek envelopes inside a box or padded envelope write it on those. On a shipping label placed loose inside or slip of paper. To and From addresses. Can't hurt and like a fire extinguisher you hope will never be needed if it is needed it is badly needed.

LeadHead72
02-17-2020, 08:52 PM
The second shipping label information inside is a good idea. If the outside label gets damaged, or the box gets totally mangled the post office will check the contents for information on where to ship it. If one is using the tyvek envelopes inside a box or padded envelope write it on those. On a shipping label placed loose inside or slip of paper. To and From addresses. Can't hurt and like a fire extinguisher you hope will never be needed if it is needed it is badly needed.

At first this sounds like a good idea. However, I know of someone who did that and the PO ended up charging them double the postage. The package received damage and both labels ended up being scanned by the USPS system and they treated it as though they were trying to send two separate packages under one tracking number. It's better to double-bag the items if necessary, reinforce the edges and corners of the package and make sure it's insured. If it's damaged or lost, file a claim. I have shipped and received hundreds of packages over the last few years and have had several claims. The USPS has come through on all of them except for one. The last time was just a few weeks ago and they paid the claim, no questions asked, within a week to 10 days of filing it online. Just be sure to include pictures of the damaged package, damaged goods, and screenshots of online prices for a similar replacement product.

HumptyDumpty
02-18-2020, 08:14 AM
How about primed cases? My understanding, is that they must be sent ground, via a contract carrier (not USPS), but do not require hazmat or ORMD/Limted Quantity labels. Does that check with your experience?

LeadHead72
02-18-2020, 10:55 AM
How about primed cases? My understanding, is that they must be sent ground, via a contract carrier (not USPS), but do not require hazmat or ORMD/Limted Quantity labels. Does that check with your experience?
Yes, I've always understood that they get treated the same way as live ammo.

rondog
02-18-2020, 10:40 PM
At first this sounds like a good idea. However, I know of someone who did that and the PO ended up charging them double the postage. The package received damage and both labels ended up being scanned by the USPS system and they treated it as though they were trying to send two separate packages under one tracking number. It's better to double-bag the items if necessary, reinforce the edges and corners of the package and make sure it's insured. If it's damaged or lost, file a claim. I have shipped and received hundreds of packages over the last few years and have had several claims. The USPS has come through on all of them except for one. The last time was just a few weeks ago and they paid the claim, no questions asked, within a week to 10 days of filing it online. Just be sure to include pictures of the damaged package, damaged goods, and screenshots of online prices for a similar replacement product.

I'm talking about hand-written labels, the old school kind, not printed labels with bar codes.